Does 'most' really not mean 'most'

Captainunaccountable
Posts: 93
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 1:36 pm

Does 'most' really not mean 'most'

Postby Captainunaccountable » Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:32 pm

For strengthen/weaken questions it seems like there are correct answer choices, especially in the harder questions, that require you to make an assumption. For instance, PT23-S2-Q26 (I did get this one right, just trying to show my point) answer choice E requires that you assume that having more passengers in your vehicle means that it is less conclusive based on the evidence that teenagers lack basic driving skills. For all we know, just because one has more passengers, doesn't take away the fact that they caused traffic accidents and thus lack bad driving skills. It's easy to make that leap of faith, but still..

A better example is probably PT16-S2-Q16. In answer choice (E) you are required to make an assumption. Just because these fishermen might have something that allows them to better locate sharks doesn't necessarily mean that they will do so. For this one, we have to assume that they will use it.

This is confusing for me because I've been trained to be quite exact and vigilant of language, when sometimes generalized AC's are correct.
Am I just being too literal? Is there some common sense assumptions that we are supposed to make sometimes?

Thanks.
Last edited by Captainunaccountable on Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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sublime
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Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2013 12:21 pm

Re: Does 'most' really not mean 'most'

Postby sublime » Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:34 pm

..

BPlaura
Posts: 197
Joined: Mon Dec 02, 2013 4:51 pm

Re: Does 'most' really not mean 'most'

Postby BPlaura » Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:28 pm

Re the teenagers question, the teenagers are responsible for X percent of traffic fatalities. E says that they are more likely to have more people in their car. That means that they might be getting in fewer accidents overall, but because they have more people in their car, more people are killed in a single accident. Is it still possible that teenagers are bad drivers? Yeah, definitely. But you've seriously weakened the evidence, which relies on the percentage of fatalities.

Re the fishermen question, the language in E says that they HAVE USED this equipment since 1980. You're not required to assume that they will use it - the answer choice straight-up tells you that they will use it.

In short, no, these don't require any unwarranted assumptions.

Captainunaccountable
Posts: 93
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 1:36 pm

Re: Does 'most' really not mean 'most'

Postby Captainunaccountable » Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:31 pm

Thanks.




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