Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

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Wrong Marx
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Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby Wrong Marx » Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:28 pm

I'm at the point where I'm able to consistently score 175 to 180 on full-length PTs that I've seen before (I'm doing 5- or 6-section tests). However, on some sections, I am still working past 30 minutes, but I am consistently able to complete sections within about 32-33 minutes. Should I be deducting points for questions that were not completed within 30 minutes? Is there a valid way to handicap the scores that I achieve on retaken PTs? (This would be important, because I want see if there is a way I can use the scaled score to track my improvement on these retakes.)

I will be retaking LSAT in February (first time around I ended up with 169 in October), but my problem is that I have very little fresh material remaining: the 3 SuperPrep tests (not sure how useful these will be, since they are so old) and PT71, which I guess will be released around the end of this month or beginning of January, so I am trying to take full advantage of the other PTs by retaking as many of them as I can, and will be doing the four fresh tests that I have remaining between now and mid-January.

What is the best way to identify weaknesses with PTs that I've seen before? I've been trying to circle questions that cause me to slow down, and I've also developed the habit of writing down the elapsed time next to "GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE" on the right pages only and the elapsed time on section completion next to the "S T O P" sign, because sometimes I fail to circle questions that I should have circled, and this gives me a way to check my pacing. Obviously, I am still looking closely at questions I answered incorrectly, but elapsed time is the only objective measure I can think of to ID weaknesses on sections with no missed points.

Any advice?

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bohemiandaisy
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Re: Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby bohemiandaisy » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:25 pm

bump.

Need this question answered too

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Sirs_LMNOPQRS
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Re: Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby Sirs_LMNOPQRS » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:26 pm

Is there a valid way to handicap the scores that I achieve on retaken PTs?


No.

Have you taken absolutely ALL of the PTs?

dosto
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Re: Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby dosto » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:47 pm

.
Last edited by dosto on Wed Sep 02, 2015 1:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

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cahwc12
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Re: Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby cahwc12 » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:55 pm

If you answer the problem quickly because you remember the method, then it doesn't matter.

If you answer the problem quickly because you remember which answer is correct, then it isn't helpful.


Probably you're in the former group for most of the questions. Don't retake exams you've seen in the past 2-4 weeks if you can help it. I had a repeat schedule and I'd try to go at least 4-6 weeks before repeating a test. See if that works for you. I ended up taking every 41-65 test 2-3 times and very rarely encountered a question where my remembering aspects of it encumbered me to a degree where I couldn't apply the method.

It's a bit more difficult for RC because you'll have a better memory of the passages, but for LR and LG, everything starts to look the same anyway after the 20th PT or so, so it shouldn't really be a problem.

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Jeffort
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Re: Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby Jeffort » Thu Dec 12, 2013 2:33 am

dosto wrote:Forget the idea of a handicap since your scores should not be your priority on retakes; they are inflated and not true instances of your response to fresh material. Retakes should be used for the purpose of honing your skills and getting a better understanding of how the questions and answers work.


^This. People put way to much focus on tracking their score range instead of doing the work needed to improve the score. Fresh timed PTs main value is just to see what your range is and does little to improve your range. Drilling and review is where improvement comes from. People need to stop focusing soo much on wanting to check score range all the time instead of just working on getting better at analyzing questions properly. It's not important to know your exact score range every step of the way, just always assume you still need to get better, stop procrastinating by debating how to do it and just get back to doing lots more LSAT work!

Think of it this way, are you going to study/practice less for the re-take if your PT scores are really high? If so and that's why knowing your true score range all the time is so important, then you likely won't hit your goal on re-take anyway since you'd be looking for lazy shortcuts so don't worry about re-using materials and look for excuses to not re-study tests you've worked before, everything will naturally work itself out as a result of the efforts you actually are willing to and do put in regardless of whether you know your true range or not. If you're going to try less/work less hard if you know your score range is above your goal, that will likely be reflected in a lower than expected re-take score.

buenolaw
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Re: Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby buenolaw » Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:21 pm

....
Last edited by buenolaw on Thu May 15, 2014 10:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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milkandcheerios
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Re: Handicapping a PT retake? Maximize exhausted material?

Postby milkandcheerios » Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:19 pm

I exhausted all my material before the Oct LSAT so to study for my retake, I would give myself only 30-32 minutes per section. I noticed that it was making me rush a little but I had timing issues on my first take so I didn't think it was necessarily a bad thing. Just make sure you don't cut corners that you wouldn't normally cut on the actual LSAT in order to make the shorter amount of time (ie. don't skip reading all the LR answer choices). That way, you're actually learning to read/think faster rather than just cheating yourself.

but like i said, I realized i worked too slow on the october lsat. I never did when I was studying but I guess test day anxiety made me extra careful and slow. If you don't have timing issues, I don't know if giving yourself less time would actually help.




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