PT70 S4 Q23

lawschool2014hopeful
Posts: 554
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:48 pm

PT70 S4 Q23

Postby lawschool2014hopeful » Sun Dec 01, 2013 3:20 pm

I honestly cannot articulate the difference between D and E other than a feel that D is more ridiculous, therefore, highlighting the parallel error better

Any one else?

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Christine (MLSAT)
Posts: 358
Joined: Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:41 pm

Re: PT70 S4 Q23

Postby Christine (MLSAT) » Sun Dec 01, 2013 3:32 pm

jimmierock wrote:I honestly cannot articulate the difference between D and E other than a feel that D is more ridiculous, therefore, highlighting the parallel error better

Any one else?



(E) is essentially reversed.

Think of the original argument in abstract terms:

Almost every X has been Y.
This thing is Y.
Therefore, it will probably be X.


X = successful product
Y = massive TV ad campaign

(D) has the same pattern. X would be president, Y would be Ph.D.

(E) is flipped:

Almost every X has been Y.
Thing is X.
Therefore, it will probably by Y.


X = novel published by Peninsula Press
Y = profitable


It's really easy to miss that flip when you're just holding the information in your head. A quick and really basic shorthand can help you notice when the structure is identical or near-identical but the elements are in the wrong slots.

Hope that helps!

lawschool2014hopeful
Posts: 554
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:48 pm

Re: PT70 S4 Q23

Postby lawschool2014hopeful » Sun Dec 01, 2013 5:15 pm

Christine (MLSAT) wrote:
jimmierock wrote:I honestly cannot articulate the difference between D and E other than a feel that D is more ridiculous, therefore, highlighting the parallel error better

Any one else?



(E) is essentially reversed.

Think of the original argument in abstract terms:

Almost every X has been Y.
This thing is Y.
Therefore, it will probably be X.


X = successful product
Y = massive TV ad campaign

(D) has the same pattern. X would be president, Y would be Ph.D.

(E) is flipped:

Almost every X has been Y.
Thing is X.
Therefore, it will probably by Y.


X = novel published by Peninsula Press
Y = profitable


It's really easy to miss that flip when you're just holding the information in your head. A quick and really basic shorthand can help you notice when the structure is identical or near-identical but the elements are in the wrong slots.

Hope that helps!



Awesome thanks. Jesus, this flip felt so convoluted Not used to these more subtle conditionals. I was reading the stimulus as almost X was preceded by Y, and saw either D nor E has proceeding and proceded in staying confused.




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