RC

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PIBB
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:40 pm

RC

Postby PIBB » Tue Nov 19, 2013 9:30 pm

I have been doing a modified version of the reading comp advice posted by Thelonious Kwiggz.

I'll take a PT and review the RC section a few hours later. I'll re-read each passage, reading closely for details but focus heavily on the argument structure. Next, I open a word document and type the passage from memory. Reading for structure allows me to remember the details from each paragraph. For example, if I can just remember that paragraph two was about the critics opposition to legal reform, much of the time the details kind of naturally fill in for me (at least after doing this many times). After typing out the whole passage, I type out the structure of the passage in terms of what roles each paragraph played in relation to the main point. Finally, I type out the author's view/tone.

After I complete this phase, I go back to the questions and re-answer everything. For the most part, I get everything correct on this second run through, but with a solid understanding of the argument structure I am able to quickly and easily jump to the passage to find answers I'm not 100% on.

This strategy really cements the idea of reading for structure in your mind. Questions have become a breeze because I now know where to find supporting evidence, and am seeing them more like LR questions (also allowing me to see scope and relevancy issues in answer choices).

I imagine much of this sounds like common sense, but it makes LSAT reading a habit.

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sashafierce
Posts: 454
Joined: Sun Aug 04, 2013 11:44 am

Re: RC

Postby sashafierce » Thu Nov 21, 2013 2:13 pm

PIBB wrote:ll take a PT and review the RC section a few hours later. I'll re-read each passage, reading closely for details but focus heavily on the argument structure. Next, I open a word document and type the passage from memory. Reading for structure allows me to remember the details from each paragraph. For example, if I can just remember that paragraph two was about the critics opposition to legal reform, much of the time the details kind of naturally fill in for me (at least after doing this many times). After typing out the whole passage, I type out the structure of the passage in terms of what roles each paragraph played in relation to the main point. Finally, I type out the author's view/tone.


I do something similar to this and it helps alot. What I have noticed from doing this is that when doing other RC passages I start recognizing the important parts of the passage which makes answering questions easier.

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PIBB
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Joined: Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:40 pm

Re: RC

Postby PIBB » Thu Nov 21, 2013 3:45 pm

sashafierce wrote:
PIBB wrote:ll take a PT and review the RC section a few hours later. I'll re-read each passage, reading closely for details but focus heavily on the argument structure. Next, I open a word document and type the passage from memory. Reading for structure allows me to remember the details from each paragraph. For example, if I can just remember that paragraph two was about the critics opposition to legal reform, much of the time the details kind of naturally fill in for me (at least after doing this many times). After typing out the whole passage, I type out the structure of the passage in terms of what roles each paragraph played in relation to the main point. Finally, I type out the author's view/tone.


I do something similar to this and it helps alot. What I have noticed from doing this is that when doing other RC passages I start recognizing the important parts of the passage which makes answering questions easier.


Yes, exactly the point of going through these steps. Before implementing this strategy, I would kind of just read and head to the questions with an understanding of the structure, but without an understanding of how the questions would be crafted. There's no doubt that it's important to have an intimate understanding of the passage flow, but mastery requires an understanding of how questions are drawn. This strategy works on that.

lsat_hopeful
Posts: 95
Joined: Tue Oct 08, 2013 7:08 pm

Re: RC

Postby lsat_hopeful » Thu Nov 21, 2013 4:44 pm

PIBB wrote:
sashafierce wrote:
PIBB wrote:ll take a PT and review the RC section a few hours later. I'll re-read each passage, reading closely for details but focus heavily on the argument structure. Next, I open a word document and type the passage from memory. Reading for structure allows me to remember the details from each paragraph. For example, if I can just remember that paragraph two was about the critics opposition to legal reform, much of the time the details kind of naturally fill in for me (at least after doing this many times). After typing out the whole passage, I type out the structure of the passage in terms of what roles each paragraph played in relation to the main point. Finally, I type out the author's view/tone.


I do something similar to this and it helps alot. What I have noticed from doing this is that when doing other RC passages I start recognizing the important parts of the passage which makes answering questions easier.


Yes, exactly the point of going through these steps. Before implementing this strategy, I would kind of just read and head to the questions with an understanding of the structure, but without an understanding of how the questions would be crafted. There's no doubt that it's important to have an intimate understanding of the passage flow, but mastery requires an understanding of how questions are drawn. This strategy works on that.


Sounds like a good strategy! Gonna give this a try - thanks!

KDLMaj
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 4:07 pm

Re: RC

Postby KDLMaj » Thu Dec 19, 2013 7:13 pm

I just posted some RC Advice in the RC Repetition thread that you may want to take a look at.

Most of what you're describing is great, but the one thing that you don't really need to waste time on is re-writing the passage. Here are some other things you can try to help out.

1) As you review each RC question, go back and mark where in the passage the correct answer came from. Then try to figure out how you could have known that piece was going to be tested. Take a look at the parts of the passage you spent time on that weren't tested- how could you have known they weren't going to matter? (What you are tested on is, by and large, NOT random)

2) Practice reading the intro and 1st sentences of passages and try to figure out the following things:
i) what's it about? (Hint: it's always a theory/perspective, a debate of different perspectives, something significant someone has done, or a problem/phenomenon)
ii) what is each paragraph going to be about?
iii) which paragraph will have the main idea?
iv) bonus: what IS the main idea? (You'd be shocked at how often you can figure this out with just the intro and first sentences)

On test day, ALWAYS read the intro and first sentences of a passage first, THEN go skim the rest. As you stated- once you have the overall structure in place, it's VERY easy to fill in the rest. Instead of using that to your benefit after the fact, try using it in the moment.

3) Author's are, broadly speaking, always pro, con, or neutral. Practice skimming through passages and figuring out what the author is quickly. The equation for the main idea is: author's opinion of the scope of the passage. Start making an excel spreadsheet of passages based on these categories to see how often they show up. Here's a cheat sheet:

Theory/Perspective Passages (most common by far): Usually con (often with an alternative presented). Rarely pro. Neutral means the MI is a description of the theory/perspective

Debate: Almost nonexistent at this point. Usually pro one side over the author (MI = how they feel about the pro side) or con on both (often with a third alternative presented which is the main idea)

Something a person has done: (Second most common) Usually neutral, virtually never con. MI is almost always just a description of the thing the author finds to be significant about that person. Beware, these passages usually talk about someone famous and awesome. That doesn't mean the author is actively arguing they're great. Saying Einstein revolutionized physics *isn't* an opinion. It's just a fact.

Problem/Phenomon: (Slightly less common than what a person has done passages) These days, it's almost always about a problem. If they just state the problem, the main idea is the problem. Look out for a solution, however. If there's a proposed solution, the MI is how the author feels about that solution. (not always pro- be careful)

Good luck!




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