How do you review RC

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OVOXO
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How do you review RC

Postby OVOXO » Wed Nov 06, 2013 4:01 pm

I’m at the point where I can go −1 on RC (though up to −5 has happened in the past). Unlike LG (where I redo the game over and over) and LR (write out explanations), I’m unsure how to review RC. When the clock isn’t ticking, I can always find the right answer.

Any rec’s would be appreciated!

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mellow
Posts: 296
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Re: How do you review RC

Postby mellow » Wed Nov 06, 2013 4:28 pm

OVOXO wrote:I’m at the point where I can go −1 on RC (though up to −5 has happened in the past). Unlike LG (where I redo the game over and over) and LR (write out explanations), I’m unsure how to review RC. When the clock isn’t ticking, I can always find the right answer.

Any rec’s would be appreciated!

There's your solution. I was in a similar position where I was getting anywhere between -5 and -0, but after practicing and speeding up my timing (without sacrificing accuracy), I've gone consistently -2 and -0. The one time in the past week that I dipped below and got a -4 was the only time I had less than five minutes to review before time was called.

Your accuracy is already there; you just need to work on doing well even with time constraints. Sometimes this means reading faster, going with gut answers, etc. And honestly with timing, more practice seems to be the answer. Drill back to back RC passages, maybe even multiple RC sections in a row.

HTH

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usernotfound
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Re: How do you review RC

Postby usernotfound » Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:52 pm

Would also like some responses. RC is killing me. I am averaging like -6-8 per test with -0/1 on LG and -2/3 on LR. RC just feels so arbitrary to me.

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retaking23
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Re: How do you review RC

Postby retaking23 » Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:53 pm

MY RC is a work in progress so take my input with a grain of salt. I got -5 on RC on PT67 and PT70 (my two official LSATs). Recently I've begun to read strictly for structure and main point. This keeps me from getting caught up in convoluted and verbose details and forces me to constantly refer back to the passage for those questions that deal with details. I have also stopped annotating. I make no marks at all. This requires that I stay super focused while reading (which again makes it easier to simply read for structure and main point). It is slowly starting to work for me and I hope within a couple of weeks it will take me to -2 heaven. Either way, I think that this is the ideal way to do RC. Many top scorers also say this and it is also promoted by the Trainer.

To put it more simply, transform the passage into one big argument and make mental notes of where the premises/counter-premises are while you try to uncover the reasoning structure. When you move on to questions, do them just like you would LR but keep a more open mind. If you don't find anything from passage to feasibly support an answer, eliminate it and move on.

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vicpin5190
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Re: How do you review RC

Postby vicpin5190 » Thu Nov 07, 2013 1:10 am

retaking23 wrote:MY RC is a work in progress so take my input with a grain of salt. I got -5 on RC on PT67 and PT70 (my two official LSATs). Recently I've begun to read strictly for structure and main point. This keeps me from getting caught up in convoluted and verbose details and forces me to constantly refer back to the passage for those questions that deal with details. I have also stopped annotating. I make no marks at all. This requires that I stay super focused while reading (which again makes it easier to simply read for structure and main point). It is slowly starting to work for me and I hope within a couple of weeks it will take me to -2 heaven. Either way, I think that this is the ideal way to do RC. Many top scorers also say this and it is also promoted by the Trainer.

To put it more simply, transform the passage into one big argument and make mental notes of where the premises/counter-premises are while you try to uncover the reasoning structure. When you move on to questions, do them just like you would LR but keep a more open mind. If you don't find anything from passage to feasibly support an answer, eliminate it and move on.


That's close to what I've started doing. Though i still make marks where there are lists and I underline main points that I think are present. But usually I like to keep mental tabs on what each paragraph is talking about within the argument so I have a reference of where to go back to answer a question if I need to. It seems to be working so far?

Mahone Shore
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Re: How do you review RC

Postby Mahone Shore » Thu Nov 07, 2013 8:08 am

+1!

I was forced to stop annotating and keep focused on structure. It helps many kinds of RC passages except for informational passage.(no opinions, just introduce a thing with many detail questions) Curious about how you do those questions?

I got -12 in PT68, cuz I do notes and left one passage untouched!

retaking23 wrote:MY RC is a work in progress so take my input with a grain of salt. I got -5 on RC on PT67 and PT70 (my two official LSATs). Recently I've begun to read strictly for structure and main point. This keeps me from getting caught up in convoluted and verbose details and forces me to constantly refer back to the passage for those questions that deal with details. I have also stopped annotating. I make no marks at all. This requires that I stay super focused while reading (which again makes it easier to simply read for structure and main point). It is slowly starting to work for me and I hope within a couple of weeks it will take me to -2 heaven. Either way, I think that this is the ideal way to do RC. Many top scorers also say this and it is also promoted by the Trainer.

To put it more simply, transform the passage into one big argument and make mental notes of where the premises/counter-premises are while you try to uncover the reasoning structure. When you move on to questions, do them just like you would LR but keep a more open mind. If you don't find anything from passage to feasibly support an answer, eliminate it and move on.

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bobtheblob916
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Re: How do you review RC

Postby bobtheblob916 » Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:08 am

Just gonna copy-paste some RC advice I PM'd someone a while back. Bit wordy, but hope it helps.

Some things that worked for me:

1) Read for structure - you've probably heard this before, but it really is the main thing that RC tests you on. When you read the passage, don't focus on the details. Screw the details. You should be able to follow the content of the argument as you go on, but what you should be thinking about is

What was the purpose of that paragraph I just read?

What is the main point (almost always hinted at in the last sentence of paragraph 1)?

What are the opposing views?

How is this paragraph connected to the overall passage, i.e argument flow?


The thing is, once you get good at figuring out what the purpose of each paragraph is, and the order in which the argument flows, it becomes much easier to find the details you're looking for in specific question.

It's much harder, however, to try and figure things like main point and argument flow out AFTER you've finished the passage. Doing so will require a fair bit of rereading, and you'll waste time.


2) Develop a SIMPLE annotation system, but don't rely on it too much.

Honestly, annotations might help, but if you really want to get to the level of acing RC, you can't rely on them, at least in my opinion. You need to be able to hold that information in your head. You only have 7-10 minutes PER passage, and obsessing over annotating is just not that effective within that period.

The thing is, these passages are pretty short.

3) EVERY question has an answer in the text.

That's right. The text wins over your intuition, 100% of the time (Well, except when you simply have no time, but that shouldn't happen if you've practiced enough).

4) PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE

I was drilling 3 or so timed RC sections a day in addition to my regular PTing in the last few weeks. This helped immensely. You might have read on these boards that RC passages don't have that much variety.

I didn't believe this at first, but once I had done around 70% of all the RC passages, I finally begun to see it. You do get better at organizing the info and even predicting the arguments as you practice. Like I said, these passages are pretty short, and there's only so much variation between them.

5) Isolate your weaknesses and work on them.

If your score is fluctuating like that, you may not have some specific recurring weaknesses. But maybe a certain subject matter always gives you trouble. Maybe science passages go slowly for you. Don't let this be an issue. Read Scientific American, or the Economist, or any well-written magazine in the subject that gives you trouble. Spend 30 minutes a day on their website reading articles.

6) When you review question you missed, go in the passage and find out exactly why your answer was wrong, why any answers you failed to eliminate were wrong, and why the correct answer was right.

This is especially important in main point and some other questions, because it isn't all that rare that two answer choices are nearly the same, save for a few key words.


Hopefully this helps. RC is the only section where I feel there is no definitive strategy, because some methods just work better for different people. But reading for structure and learning how to quickly find what you need in the text is key.

bp shinners
Posts: 3091
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:05 pm

Re: How do you review RC

Postby bp shinners » Thu Nov 07, 2013 1:53 pm

retaking23 wrote:MY RC is a work in progress so take my input with a grain of salt. I got -5 on RC on PT67 and PT70 (my two official LSATs). Recently I've begun to read strictly for structure and main point. This keeps me from getting caught up in convoluted and verbose details and forces me to constantly refer back to the passage for those questions that deal with details. I have also stopped annotating. I make no marks at all. This requires that I stay super focused while reading (which again makes it easier to simply read for structure and main point). It is slowly starting to work for me and I hope within a couple of weeks it will take me to -2 heaven. Either way, I think that this is the ideal way to do RC. Many top scorers also say this and it is also promoted by the Trainer.

To put it more simply, transform the passage into one big argument and make mental notes of where the premises/counter-premises are while you try to uncover the reasoning structure. When you move on to questions, do them just like you would LR but keep a more open mind. If you don't find anything from passage to feasibly support an answer, eliminate it and move on.


I'd recommend all of this except skipping the note-taking. Write out 4-5 words after each paragraph (or, if there's a shift in the paragraph, each segment) that sums up the viewpoint and role ("Biologist studies"; "Author's examples") so that you can quickly find things and don't have to juggle all that information in your STM.

Mahone Shore
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 10:37 am

Re: How do you review RC

Postby Mahone Shore » Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:13 am

Thank you! About trainning 3 sections per day seems very effictive. I have no other way to crash RC for now, so I will try your method.

bobtheblob916 wrote:Just gonna copy-paste some RC advice I PM'd someone a while back. Bit wordy, but hope it helps.

Some things that worked for me:

1) Read for structure - you've probably heard this before, but it really is the main thing that RC tests you on. When you read the passage, don't focus on the details. Screw the details. You should be able to follow the content of the argument as you go on, but what you should be thinking about is

What was the purpose of that paragraph I just read?

What is the main point (almost always hinted at in the last sentence of paragraph 1)?

What are the opposing views?

How is this paragraph connected to the overall passage, i.e argument flow?


The thing is, once you get good at figuring out what the purpose of each paragraph is, and the order in which the argument flows, it becomes much easier to find the details you're looking for in specific question.

It's much harder, however, to try and figure things like main point and argument flow out AFTER you've finished the passage. Doing so will require a fair bit of rereading, and you'll waste time.


2) Develop a SIMPLE annotation system, but don't rely on it too much.

Honestly, annotations might help, but if you really want to get to the level of acing RC, you can't rely on them, at least in my opinion. You need to be able to hold that information in your head. You only have 7-10 minutes PER passage, and obsessing over annotating is just not that effective within that period.

The thing is, these passages are pretty short.

3) EVERY question has an answer in the text.

That's right. The text wins over your intuition, 100% of the time (Well, except when you simply have no time, but that shouldn't happen if you've practiced enough).

4) PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE

I was drilling 3 or so timed RC sections a day in addition to my regular PTing in the last few weeks. This helped immensely. You might have read on these boards that RC passages don't have that much variety.

I didn't believe this at first, but once I had done around 70% of all the RC passages, I finally begun to see it. You do get better at organizing the info and even predicting the arguments as you practice. Like I said, these passages are pretty short, and there's only so much variation between them.

5) Isolate your weaknesses and work on them.

If your score is fluctuating like that, you may not have some specific recurring weaknesses. But maybe a certain subject matter always gives you trouble. Maybe science passages go slowly for you. Don't let this be an issue. Read Scientific American, or the Economist, or any well-written magazine in the subject that gives you trouble. Spend 30 minutes a day on their website reading articles.

6) When you review question you missed, go in the passage and find out exactly why your answer was wrong, why any answers you failed to eliminate were wrong, and why the correct answer was right.

This is especially important in main point and some other questions, because it isn't all that rare that two answer choices are nearly the same, save for a few key words.


Hopefully this helps. RC is the only section where I feel there is no definitive strategy, because some methods just work better for different people. But reading for structure and learning how to quickly find what you need in the text is key.

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crazyrobin
Posts: 442
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2012 2:52 am

Re: How do you review RC

Postby crazyrobin » Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:32 am

This!!!

bobtheblob916 wrote:Just gonna copy-paste some RC advice I PM'd someone a while back. Bit wordy, but hope it helps.

Some things that worked for me:

1) Read for structure - you've probably heard this before, but it really is the main thing that RC tests you on. When you read the passage, don't focus on the details. Screw the details. You should be able to follow the content of the argument as you go on, but what you should be thinking about is

What was the purpose of that paragraph I just read?

What is the main point (almost always hinted at in the last sentence of paragraph 1)?

What are the opposing views?

How is this paragraph connected to the overall passage, i.e argument flow?


The thing is, once you get good at figuring out what the purpose of each paragraph is, and the order in which the argument flows, it becomes much easier to find the details you're looking for in specific question.

It's much harder, however, to try and figure things like main point and argument flow out AFTER you've finished the passage. Doing so will require a fair bit of rereading, and you'll waste time.


2) Develop a SIMPLE annotation system, but don't rely on it too much.

Honestly, annotations might help, but if you really want to get to the level of acing RC, you can't rely on them, at least in my opinion. You need to be able to hold that information in your head. You only have 7-10 minutes PER passage, and obsessing over annotating is just not that effective within that period.

The thing is, these passages are pretty short.

3) EVERY question has an answer in the text.

That's right. The text wins over your intuition, 100% of the time (Well, except when you simply have no time, but that shouldn't happen if you've practiced enough).

4) PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE

I was drilling 3 or so timed RC sections a day in addition to my regular PTing in the last few weeks. This helped immensely. You might have read on these boards that RC passages don't have that much variety.

I didn't believe this at first, but once I had done around 70% of all the RC passages, I finally begun to see it. You do get better at organizing the info and even predicting the arguments as you practice. Like I said, these passages are pretty short, and there's only so much variation between them.

5) Isolate your weaknesses and work on them.

If your score is fluctuating like that, you may not have some specific recurring weaknesses. But maybe a certain subject matter always gives you trouble. Maybe science passages go slowly for you. Don't let this be an issue. Read Scientific American, or the Economist, or any well-written magazine in the subject that gives you trouble. Spend 30 minutes a day on their website reading articles.

6) When you review question you missed, go in the passage and find out exactly why your answer was wrong, why any answers you failed to eliminate were wrong, and why the correct answer was right.

This is especially important in main point and some other questions, because it isn't all that rare that two answer choices are nearly the same, save for a few key words.


Hopefully this helps. RC is the only section where I feel there is no definitive strategy, because some methods just work better for different people. But reading for structure and learning how to quickly find what you need in the text is key.




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