Logic Games Drilling Advice

taylorswiftfan
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Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby taylorswiftfan » Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:16 pm

LG used to be my strongest section, with LR being my weakest. I decided two months ago to only focus on LR by using the Manhattan LR book, because I was doing really well with LG and terribly with LR. Now that I'm trying to get back to studying LG, I find myself taking forever on the games. I know I should have planned better...but I can't go back so I have to figure out a strategy to tackle games again at this point. It's a frustrating feeling to get every game right before and then not practice it and take forever on games. :cry:

Should I just drill specific kinds of games each week or should I just do timed LG sections (mixed games) daily? I was trying to do a timed 35 min section and it took me a lot longer than it should have. Should I just buy the LG packets on Cambridge and drill that way each week before December?

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retaking23
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby retaking23 » Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:59 pm

taylorswiftfan wrote:LG used to be my strongest section, with LR being my weakest. I decided two months ago to only focus on LR by using the Manhattan LR book, because I was doing really well with LG and terribly with LR. Now that I'm trying to get back to studying LG, I find myself taking forever on the games. I know I should have planned better...but I can't go back so I have to figure out a strategy to tackle games again at this point. It's a frustrating feeling to get every game right before and then not practice it and take forever on games. :cry:

Should I just drill specific kinds of games each week or should I just do timed LG sections (mixed games) daily? I was trying to do a timed 35 min section and it took me a lot longer than it should have. Should I just buy the LG packets on Cambridge and drill that way each week before December?


Step 1. Drill a game.
Step 2. Review it using 7sage.
Step 3. Do steps 1 and 2 for as many games it takes to get you doing consistently well (-2 or less). Repeat games as necessary.

Edit: Buying Cambridge would be a very wise investment. Just one volume should be enough. Make sure to drill them all in a relatively short period of time to get the most out of drilling.

taylorswiftfan
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby taylorswiftfan » Wed Nov 06, 2013 12:29 am

Thanks Retaking23!

What did you mean by "one volume" of cambridge lsat lg? I was planning on purchasing all the different LG problem sets they have since I'm rusty on all the games at this point and timing and efficient strategy is my main problem now.

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Jeffort
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby Jeffort » Wed Nov 06, 2013 2:26 am

Your are just rusty from taking time away from focusing on LGs. Your speed and skills you had before will come back quickly just from getting back into gear by drilling games again, and then your timing will get back in line too. Just get back into games with drilling, review, timed practice, review, lather rinse repeat.

You can get all the cambridge LG packets and drill from there or use full sections or pull ones from sections. Your choice, but to drill by type getting the packets saves you a lot of organization time from having to find and compile them yourself by type.

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IgosduIkana
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby IgosduIkana » Wed Nov 06, 2013 3:11 am

Yeah I agree, you're just rusty. Get back to drilling them and you should return to form. Also, try not to focus exclusively on any section in the future, keep everything in the mix so that this doesn't happen again.

taylorswiftfan
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby taylorswiftfan » Wed Nov 06, 2013 12:45 pm

Thanks for the advice everyone. Yeah I'm registered to take the exam in December so I hope it isn't too late to do mixed review and targeted review at this point and to make a substantial improvement (to get back to where I was scoring with LG)...

My plan is to try doing all the different types of games this week and then focus on the ones I'm struggling with a lot, then keep drilling to make sure I get back to where I used to be with Logic Games. I'm hoping I can get this all done by December 6th.

The LSAT Trainer
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Wed Nov 06, 2013 1:28 pm

Just wanted to mention that I think it's really useful to have specific goals and gauges as you drill -- by knowing what you want to get better at, and by being able to keep track of how you are doing relative to those goals, you can get a lot more out of your work.

There are three basic skills that I think every test taker needs in order to put himself/herself in the best position to succeed, regardless of whatever diagramming/prep methods he/she uses. All these skills are fairly basic and easily attainable, but I've found that even at the 170 level, students often make games harder than they need to be because they don't have these three things down -- so, all that is a long-winded way for me to say I think it's a good idea for you to remind yourself to firm up these three things during your prep:

1) You should be able to easily visualize the basic design of every game and every base.

All games are closely related to one another, and they all work off of a few basic templates, and by the time you go into the test no design should be surprising for you. The better you are at visualizing a game, the easier it is to play it.

Test: Go through old games you've played, just looking at the scenario and rules quickly. See if you can easily tell what type of game it is/what sort of base you should set up (though of course it's understandable you may not be able to decide whether to create frames/hypos and such unless you take a more careful look). Again, the key word here is "easily" -- if this step is difficult for you, it's a sign you may be making certain games more difficult on yourself than they need to be because you have trouble picturing them.

Again, there are not a lot of things that can happen with the design of a game; make sure you develop a big picture understanding of all the possibilities.

2) You should have automatic and intuitive notation systems for all common rules

In general, I am not a fan of football (violence punctuated by committee meetings), but I love to watch Payton Manning play -- he's just an awesome physical representation of the human mind at work -- imagine how much worse he'd be at his job if he actually had to worry about remembering how plays work.

A lot of students feel "comfortable enough" with their notational systems, but ideally, in order to perform at your best, you want to get to a point where they are automatic -- when notating most rules feels as simple as spelling "cat." To me, this is critically important -- during the course of solving a tough q, you are going to have to build inference upon inference upon inference -- this is much much tougher to do if you have to worry about how you are notating things.

3) You should have specific and practiced processes for different types of questions

As I mention a lot in the trainer, one of my all time favorite things to do as a teacher was simply watch students solve questions and then ask them about their process. One of the most glaring and apparent things that I noticed, when I did this with students and logic games, is how much time students wasted because they approached a variety of different types of questions using the same strategies, or no strategies at all.

Question strategies will be slightly different based on whatever diagramming strategies you use, but the key is to develop consistency. One suggestion I have is to create notecards for each of the q types (conditional must be true, min/max, etc), with basic notes about how you want to approach that q type. Use these notecards as a reminder before doing practice sets and, when you notice something new to add, or when you notice you ought to change a strategy, edit the cards (make sure to include, in these strategies, the steps you ought to typically take when you get stuck on that type of problem/don't see the answer you expect, etc.).

Again, I think all of these are very attainable goals, and they are important regardless of whatever learning/diagramming systems you use. I think when you have these three things down, games become easier, and you put yourself in a much better position to play them well.

Sorry for the length -- got started writing and I couldn't stop -- hope you found it helpful -- mike

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retaking23
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby retaking23 » Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:41 pm

+1 to everything Mike wrote

I also want to add that I personally think it is very useful to practice doing certain games without drawing out all inferences and possibilities up front. The key word in that sentence was "practice." Drilling a few games here and there with just a brute force strategy will be both extra challenging and very useful. On the real test you may not be able to see that one inference that comes from combining several different rules and you may make mistakes when drawing out all of the possibilities. If that happens, you will need to rely on your brute forcing to pull you out. LG is the most automatic section for the vast majority of test takers on TLS and I think the trend in the recent games demonstrates that being able to brute force is quite crucial for keeping this section automatic. Consider subzones on PT 67. Many, including myself, were thrown into panic because it had such an odd structure we had not practiced before. Brute forcing is sometimes the only way to go.

In regards to volumes, if you have all the games you can disregard my suggestion. If you don't: http://www.cambridgelsat.com/prep-books/. I don't think you need to practice each and every game at this point. Just drilling one volume (e.g., Volume 2 in that link) should be sufficient to take you where you need to be to confidently start PTing again like you were before LG became an issue again.

Happy studying!

taylorswiftfan
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby taylorswiftfan » Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:23 pm

Hi Retaking23,

Thanks for the post. I recently bought the Cambridge LG volume 1 and 2 packs. Realized in hindsight that I should have just bought volume 2. I didn't know volume 2 existed until I bought volume 1 and they advertised volume 2 ...

Anyway, I have been practicing starting from the very basic games since I recently bombed my logic game section on a PT and my accuracy is good but my timing is terrible (10 min on a basic game!). From what I'm trying to gather from your post, are you saying that I should repeat drilling just one specific game multiple times in one sitting until I get it to perfection with the timing and the strategy? Or should I drill multiple games of the same kind in one sitting/study session? I hope what I'm asking makes sense. In another words, I'm not sure if it is more useful for me to spend one hour drilling two basic ordering games or drilling 8 basic ordering games.

Would appreciate your advice. Thanks for your help.

wolfgang
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Re: Logic Games Drilling Advice

Postby wolfgang » Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:58 pm

in all honesty, i checked out this thread just because of your username. you're awesome.

but, i figure i may as well contribute. for me, the best thing was somewhere in the middle of what you're talking about as far as number of games per hour (which, I'm assuming, you're using as a proxy for something like "how long do I stay on one game?").

It's important to not just do a game and then move on. You should be doing a game, going back, looking at your mistakes, figuring out your mistakes. This is key. You need to see WHY you made each mistake and think through how you can fix that in the future. You can always learn more by drilling the same game again, but don't go so far as to start relying on memory to do the games. I found that by doing a game, going through and really, really analyzing my mistakes, and then thinking about how to correct them next time, I could then go back and do the same game once and it would still be novel enough that I found myself having to think through things, mostly because i spent so long thinking about it. I would forget a lot in that time. Beyond that one redo, I would have that game pretty down (not "aced" in the sense that I could do it if I saw it for the first time on the test, i just meant that I was able to diagram and infer based more on memory than on skill) and I would move on.

The important points here are: do a game, spend MOST of your time analyzing your approach and mistakes, and then I found it useful to redo that same game as it gives you a chance to implement your new strategies and helps you remember them. Try not to keep on the same game once you've memorized the setup and inferences.

Worked for me. YMMV but it's at least a good starting point!




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