A few questions...

SlackOff
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A few questions...

Postby SlackOff » Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:34 pm

I'm new here, and was just looking for some answers.

I'm a freshman in college, and first and foremost wish to know whether or not it's too soon to start studying for the LSAT.
I've heard things all the way from "you should begin studying when you're a junior in high school" all the way to "2+ months before the test", so I really don't know what to make of this.

Also, last year I took this test and then based on the results, did a little bit of math and plugged it into an LSAT curve, and came out with a 165... That seems unusually high. I'm pretty smart, but that still seems high, and I know my math was correct.
So are these questions way too easy? It says that they're Barrons questions, so I'm not sure what to make of that either.

Just trying to get some answers.
Thanks in advance... Sorry if these things have been asked before.
I'd prefer no hostile answers, by the way; not sure if that's a concern here, but on other forums... Ehh.

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objection_your_honor
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Re: A few questions...

Postby objection_your_honor » Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:41 pm

Generally you want to give the LSAT 4-12 months. Any earlier than that and you risk running out of material. Revisit the idea of studying in a couple of years. Keep your GPA high and read a lot.

The test you linked to is not an official test, so I wouldn't trust the score.

SlackOff
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Re: A few questions...

Postby SlackOff » Fri Nov 01, 2013 9:30 pm

Huh... I won't start any hardcore preparation or studying for another year or so, then.

That being said, I will go take the released '07 LSAT on the LSAC website, simply because I want to know what I'd make. =P

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iamgeorgebush
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Re: A few questions...

Postby iamgeorgebush » Fri Nov 01, 2013 9:35 pm

objection_your_honor wrote:Generally you want to give the LSAT 4-12 months. Any earlier than that and you risk running out of material. Revisit the idea of studying in a couple of years. Keep your GPA high and read a lot.

The test you linked to is not an official test, so I wouldn't trust the score.

I agree with objection your honor, although I would steer people closer to the 12 month end of that range, and I would also add an hour figure in there: at least 400 hours of studying to reach your maximum potential (and likely more than that for many people). If you study for 10 hours per week, that'd be about 10 months. Definitely do not start working with official LSAC material more than a year before you plan to sit for the exam.

In the meantime, like the above poster said, keep your GPA high and read a lot. I'd recommend taking a logic class too, and at some point, start doing daily sudoku.

SlackOff
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Re: A few questions...

Postby SlackOff » Fri Nov 01, 2013 11:47 pm

Well... I'm an English and political science double major, so it's impossible for me to NOT read a lot! =P
I'm also taking a logic/critical thinking class next semester.
So it sounds like I'm on the right track...
Thanks guys.

Also, I don't plan to really start working on a LSAC material... Me taking the (free) released '07 exam is more to prove to myself that I can make a decent diagnostic score, making it worth it to keep my eye on the prize. Definitely don't plan to fool around with it any more for a long long time.
Again, thanks guys.

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Otunga
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Re: A few questions...

Postby Otunga » Sat Nov 02, 2013 12:12 am

SlackOff wrote:Well... I'm an English and political science double major, so it's impossible for me to NOT read a lot! =P
I'm also taking a logic/critical thinking class next semester.
So it sounds like I'm on the right track...
Thanks guys.

Also, I don't plan to really start working on a LSAC material... Me taking the (free) released '07 exam is more to prove to myself that I can make a decent diagnostic score, making it worth it to keep my eye on the prize. Definitely don't plan to fool around with it any more for a long long time.
Again, thanks guys.


I'm not sure what a decent diagnostic score is...but even if you were to score under 150 on it, don't get discouraged. Just be concerned first and foremost with your GPA right now, and if the double major is too much, just major in one and minor in the other for the sake of the higher GPA if you're convinced you want law school.

Excellent117
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Re: A few questions...

Postby Excellent117 » Sat Nov 02, 2013 12:49 am

Enjoy undergrad and don't think about the LSAT for at least the next 2 1/2 years.

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NotASpecialSnowflake
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Re: A few questions...

Postby NotASpecialSnowflake » Sat Nov 02, 2013 3:13 am

If I could have told myself what to do Freshman year of undergrad, I would have said get the highest GPA possible for the first two years, take a logic class, do daily Sudoku, read the WSJ and the Economist often. Then once you hit the summer between your sophomore and junior year start studying for the LSAT and take the June test in between your junior and senior year. Intern at your local public defender's office. Take easy classes and always try to get your teacher to bump your A to an A+.

SlackOff
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Re: A few questions...

Postby SlackOff » Sat Nov 02, 2013 4:15 am

^At my school, an A is a 4.0 and an A+ is a 4.3... Would law schools recalculate this?
Seems like it would be kind of unfair if they didn't, so I'm assuming the recalculate it, or at least take note of it.

Also, anything else as beneficial as Soduku?
I'll admit that I hate that game with a flaming passion.
I see how it helps with the Logic Games (which was by far the weakest section on the small test I linked, and also my weakest that I've taken so far on the LSAC test -- got interrupted halfway through it, haven't finished), but I just abhor it.

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Tiago Splitter
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Re: A few questions...

Postby Tiago Splitter » Sat Nov 02, 2013 2:46 pm

SlackOff wrote:^At my school, an A is a 4.0 and an A+ is a 4.3... Would law schools recalculate this?
Seems like it would be kind of unfair if they didn't, so I'm assuming the recalculate it, or at least take note of it.

LSAC counts the A+ as 4.33 which is why you should get as many of them as possible.

SlackOff
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Re: A few questions...

Postby SlackOff » Sat Nov 02, 2013 8:17 pm

Tiago Splitter wrote:
SlackOff wrote:^At my school, an A is a 4.0 and an A+ is a 4.3... Would law schools recalculate this?
Seems like it would be kind of unfair if they didn't, so I'm assuming the recalculate it, or at least take note of it.

LSAC counts the A+ as 4.33 which is why you should get as many of them as possible.

Noted.

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iamgeorgebush
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Re: A few questions...

Postby iamgeorgebush » Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:41 pm

SlackOff wrote:I'm also taking a logic/critical thinking class next semester.

What department is it in? I'd be suspicious of a class called "critical thinking." Make sure it's a philosophy course and that it's a LOGIC course, not some soft "how to think good" sort of thing. The latter could be counter-productive.

If I could have told myself what to do Freshman year of undergrad, I would have said get the highest GPA possible for the first two years, take a logic class, do daily Sudoku, read the WSJ and the Economist often. Then once you hit the summer between your sophomore and junior year start studying for the LSAT and take the June test in between your junior and senior year. Intern at your local public defender's office. Take easy classes and always try to get your teacher to bump your A to an A+.

I'm not quite sure why you say "get the highest GPA possible for the first two years." Assuming freshman plans on K-JD, junior grades will count too, and spending 10 hours/week for the year preceding the June exam (amounting to 520 hours, which is plenty) should not significantly impact one's ability to get the highest grades possible.

SlackOff
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Re: A few questions...

Postby SlackOff » Sat Nov 02, 2013 11:35 pm

iamgeorgebush wrote:
SlackOff wrote:I'm also taking a logic/critical thinking class next semester.

What department is it in? I'd be suspicious of a class called "critical thinking." Make sure it's a philosophy course and that it's a LOGIC course, not some soft "how to think good" sort of thing. The latter could be counter-productive.

It's in the philosophy department, and the syllabus and practice final (all I could really find online) seem to indicate it focuses on types of arguments and their components.
It's required here. Well... That or some class about a specific bit of global culture.

iamgeorgebush wrote:
If I could have told myself what to do Freshman year of undergrad, I would have said get the highest GPA possible for the first two years, take a logic class, do daily Sudoku, read the WSJ and the Economist often. Then once you hit the summer between your sophomore and junior year start studying for the LSAT and take the June test in between your junior and senior year. Intern at your local public defender's office. Take easy classes and always try to get your teacher to bump your A to an A+.

I'm not quite sure why you say "get the highest GPA possible for the first two years." Assuming freshman plans on K-JD, junior grades will count too, and spending 10 hours/week for the year preceding the June exam (amounting to 520 hours, which is plenty) should not significantly impact one's ability to get the highest grades possible.

Even if I intended to take a break (which I don't), I'd still try to stay away from slacking off.
Though, as my username might indicate, it's difficult at times.

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iamgeorgebush
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Re: A few questions...

Postby iamgeorgebush » Sat Nov 02, 2013 11:43 pm

Also, this is unrelated to the LSAT, but you might consider taking a break between UG and LS, getting some WE. Plenty of perspectives on that if you talk to some practicing attorneys.




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