Cambridge packets

Colgate87
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:33 am

Cambridge packets

Postby Colgate87 » Sun Oct 27, 2013 11:31 pm

I just started using the Cambridge packets on Friday and have noticed an improvement in my understanding of the LR sections, mainly necessary assumptions. I did an un-timed LR section, and still missed 6 problems. However, I think this was do to fast reading. I'm able to narrow my answers down to two questions, but somehow miss the mark. Anyway, my goal is to master LR in the next two weeks. Has anyone been able to make the jump from -6 to - under4 in this amount of time? Also did mastering LR in anyway help anyone to better grasp RC? In the mid to high 150s, but looking to consistently be in the 160s before thanksgiving...What do you guys think?

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Jeffort
Posts: 1897
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: Cambridge packets

Postby Jeffort » Mon Oct 28, 2013 12:05 am

It's most likely going to take more than two weeks to 'master LR'. Keep in mind that -6 untimed translates to -more than 6, try maybe -10 timed or so.

You need to keep moving forward with drilling LR q types, you have only been doing it for two days. Give it a bit more time to experience the full benefits and rewards! Keep going with drilling and thorough review to make progress and it will come.

You need to make sure you really understand logically why each wrong answer is wrong and each correct answer correct for every LR question you drill. That means careful slow motion review and dissection of each LR question after you first attempt it to make sure you really understand what is going on in the question and with the ACs and what went wrong with your analysis when you attempted it in order to improve your LR skills.

The ~6 you are currently missing untimed are likely advanced difficulty questions with more intricate reasoning involved in the question and/or answer choices that requires deeper analysis and understanding to be able to get correct for the right reasons (meaning not lucky guess/gut instinct), and that means you need to improve your argument analysis and evaluation skills in terms of identifying flaws and assumptions. Drilling a lot of LR questions of each type with deep review helps build the skills you have to apply to get the hard LR questions correct. You have time before the December test to do it, just expect more than two weeks to 'master' it.

Yes, getting better at LR helps with the other sections, partly because training for LR forces you to sharpen your reading and critical thinking skills, which are of course important for LG and RC too.

PS: getting LR questions down to two answer choices that usually includes the correct one doesn't mean that you are close to being a master of LR and only making silly timing based mistakes. All it means is that you are able to identify the two answer choices that are actually relevant and possibly responsive to the question stem. Three of the five answers on almost all LR questions are really easy to eliminate if you simply understand what the Q stem is asking for and have a basic idea of what the stimulus is generally about since those throw away answers are usually pretty far off point in easy to identify obvious superficial ways. It's pretty easy to get rid of those three and down to two on most LR questions with just basic level skills and a cursory read of the problem with limited analysis. Being able to differentiate the trap answer from the correct answer and understand logically why the CR is correct and the trap is wrong requires a much higher level of skills with much deeper analysis than just getting yourself to having a 50/50 shot at getting it right.

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nooooo
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Oct 05, 2013 2:02 pm

Re: Cambridge packets

Postby nooooo » Mon Oct 28, 2013 8:35 am

On the front of each packet, I put down a few notations:

LFR (Look for Argument) - Cr (Be Critical / Look for Flaw) - P. Ans. (Pre-phrase Answer) - Ans. <--> Sti. (Which way should I check for answer choice validity)

Depending on the type of question, I would either leave the notion or cross it out (to NOT do that particular notation) to remind me of the "job" I should be doing per question type. If I noticed I got one wrong, I'd look back at the front and see if I did in fact do what I noted on the front cover. I'm basing it off of the LSAT Trainer and tweaking them to the packet names.

For instance: On my "Most Strong Supported" packet, I crossed out each one so I (don't LFR, don't Cr, don't pre-phrase answer, and then wrote Ans. --> Sti., which reminds me to check the answer AGAINST the stimulus for validity) After being used to looking for flaws in arguments, forcing myself to not do so for these have made them exceptionally easier.

Sound tedious, but it's really helped me out to have a specific plan of attack per question type, and it becomes second nature in no-time.

Colgate87
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:33 am

Re: Cambridge packets

Postby Colgate87 » Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:33 pm

Jeffort wrote:It's most likely going to take more than two weeks to 'master LR'. Keep in mind that -6 untimed translates to -more than 6, try maybe -10 timed or so.

You need to keep moving forward with drilling LR q types, you have only been doing it for two days. Give it a bit more time to experience the full benefits and rewards! Keep going with drilling and thorough review to make progress and it will come.

You need to make sure you really understand logically why each wrong answer is wrong and each correct answer correct for every LR question you drill. That means careful slow motion review and dissection of each LR question after you first attempt it to make sure you really understand what is going on in the question and with the ACs and what went wrong with your analysis when you attempted it in order to improve your LR skills.

The ~6 you are currently missing untimed are likely advanced difficulty questions with more intricate reasoning involved in the question and/or answer choices that requires deeper analysis and understanding to be able to get correct for the right reasons (meaning not lucky guess/gut instinct), and that means you need to improve your argument analysis and evaluation skills in terms of identifying flaws and assumptions. Drilling a lot of LR questions of each type with deep review helps build the skills you have to apply to get the hard LR questions correct. You have time before the December test to do it, just expect more than two weeks to 'master' it.

Yes, getting better at LR helps with the other sections, partly because training for LR forces you to sharpen your reading and critical thinking skills, which are of course important for LG and RC too.

Thank you for you're advice. I should specify some, I have been prepping for a while. My logic games are fine, and I actually have been practicing my LR timed. During my timed practice I'm missing about -6 consistently, and doing them un-timed is when I realized there was an issue in my logic, because I was missing the same amount. After starting the Manhattan LR and doing some of the cambridge I am noticing that my understanding of the arguments is getting better, so I am hopeful that I will get my LR down to under -3 or -4 constantly. I think my biggest concern is the time between now and the test. Especially to see a score in the mid to high 160s. Also, if you can possibly relate in words...at what point did it start to click for you?




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