RC - Describe organization of passage

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josh321
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RC - Describe organization of passage

Postby josh321 » Thu Oct 17, 2013 7:03 pm

Hey guys I'm having a bit of trouble with these types of question. I tag my passage
And started reading the PS RC book any help on these types of questions. Thank you
I also have the manhattan RC, ordered if that has a specific section please let me know

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wealtheow
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Re: RC - Describe organization of passage

Postby wealtheow » Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:58 am

Manhattan RC is really too short to point out one section to focus on. Not really organized like that either, the chapters kind of build on one another. Just read the whole thing, it's a quick read, and very helpful.
One of their suggestions is to pause after each paragraph and think about what you just read, categorizing what the information "did" and how the paragraph functions as a whole - was it background info, did it introduce a "side," did it try to reconcile two opposing views. Since a new paragraph usually indicates a shift or emphasis in the argument, it can help you realize the progression of the argument. Form follows function, they say, right?
Also, are you drilling? Make sure you do. Do enough RC and you'll notice that even if the subjects vary wildly, in terms of organization they stick to just a few formulas... like LG!

bp shinners
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Re: RC - Describe organization of passage

Postby bp shinners » Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:12 pm

josh321 wrote:Hey guys I'm having a bit of trouble with these types of question. I tag my passage
And started reading the PS RC book any help on these types of questions. Thank you
I also have the manhattan RC, ordered if that has a specific section please let me know


While reading the passage, you should have a tag describing the role of each paragraph (at least - if there's a shift in the middle of a paragraph, then you should have two tags; two shifts means three tags, etc... - though 2 or more shifts is rare). These tags should say things like: biologists' conclusion; studies affirming theory; psychologist hypothesis to be tested; examples of author's main point. Notice how they're all reflective of a viewpoint; the exception to this would be a tag like "background info". These tags are the most important part of the RC passage - if you can point out these, then you have enough of the passage down to answer a majority of the questions.

If you do this, the role questions become finding the answer that reflects these tags.

So, for instance, if I have a passage like the platypus passage, my tags would be:
Biologists' conclusion - bill to hunt
Studies supporting conclusion (Bohr - mechano)
More studies supporting conclusion (Scheich - electro)

And my answer to the organization question would be something like "The passage sets out a conclusion that is then backed up by studies."

If you have those three tags, you can answer most of the questions and find the answers to the others in short order.

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iamgeorgebush
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Re: RC - Describe organization of passage

Postby iamgeorgebush » Sat Oct 19, 2013 12:39 am

I agree with shinners, that "tagging" paragraphs can be helpful, especially as you're prepping to get yourself in the habit of thinking about the passages in this way. For me, I ultimately found that this took too much time, but the exercise of doing will get you thinking about RC in the right way.

At any rate, the #1 most valuable thing about RC I found was to *read for structure*. Whenever reading a passage, think about everything in terms of its role in the overall argument. Once you can make this cognitive shift, questions about the organization of the passage will be a breeze.

bp shinners
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Re: RC - Describe organization of passage

Postby bp shinners » Mon Oct 21, 2013 1:10 pm

iamgeorgebush wrote:At any rate, the #1 most valuable thing about RC I found was to *read for structure*.


Exactly this.

That's what the tags are meant to reflect - the structure of the passage, as defined by the viewpoints and how they're supported. Details can be quickly found; structure and viewpoints take a higher level of understanding.




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