Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

cneu333
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Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby cneu333 » Tue Oct 08, 2013 2:31 am

If the word "typically" is used in a conditional statement, would you translate that to "most" or "some"?
Last edited by cneu333 on Tue Oct 08, 2013 8:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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iamgeorgebush
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby iamgeorgebush » Tue Oct 08, 2013 8:49 am

Interesting question. The dictionary definition of "typical" is does not imply any sort of majority requirement. Yet, my first instinct is to translate "A's are typically B's" as "Most A's are B's." But I'm thinking "Some A's are B's" would be the correct translation.

What's the context?
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Ambitious1
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby Ambitious1 » Tue Oct 08, 2013 9:30 am

For LSAT purposes, typically means "more often than not" which translates to most.

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jordan15
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby jordan15 » Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:26 pm

iamgeorgebush wrote:Interesting question. The dictionary definition of "typical" is does not imply any sort of majority requirement. Yet, my first instinct is to translate "A's are typically B's" as "Most A's are B's." But I'm thinking "Some A's are B's" would be the correct translation.

What's the context?


It would be wise to ignore the dictionary definition for all of these words. Almost all words like this will have a dictionary definition that will mislead you. Perhaps there's a logic dictionary or website though.

It means most btw.

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redsox
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby redsox » Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:38 pm

If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.

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Nova
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby Nova » Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:40 pm

Ambitious1 wrote:For LSAT purposes, typically means "more often than not" which translates to most.

came here to post this

Pancakes12
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby Pancakes12 » Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:59 pm

redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. So more than half the time. So most.

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Nova
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby Nova » Tue Oct 08, 2013 6:02 pm

jlb251 wrote:
redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. So more than half the time. So most.

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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby Pancakes12 » Tue Oct 08, 2013 6:03 pm

Nova wrote:
jlb251 wrote:
redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. Somore than half the time. So most.


Nova, I agree with your correction but I thought breaking it down would be more convincing to doubters.

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Nova
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby Nova » Tue Oct 08, 2013 7:08 pm

word

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redsox
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby redsox » Tue Oct 08, 2013 8:41 pm

jlb251 wrote:
redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. So more than half the time. So most.


I guess, with all those words, I have a problem with the way they interact with their antonyms. Is something that is not typical necessarily atypical? Or can it be neither typical nor atypical? Usual/unusual? Normal/abnormal? Is it one or the other, or is there a gap in between?

cneu333
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby cneu333 » Tue Oct 08, 2013 10:04 pm

So I guess it could be translated to most. Thanks!

Btw this was the sentence: "Winners of a Nobel prize for science, who are typically professional scientists, have all made significant contributions to science." (PT69 S1 #21)

I didn't really need to know the translation of typically to find out the answer to this question but I just thought it would be helpful to know just in case.

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SecondWind
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby SecondWind » Wed Oct 09, 2013 1:26 pm

Ambitious1 wrote:For LSAT purposes, typically means "more often than not" which translates to most.


^ Yep!

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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby xmking07 » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:07 pm

jlb251 wrote:
Nova wrote:
jlb251 wrote:
redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. Somore than half the time. So most.


Nova, I agree with your correction but I thought breaking it down would be more convincing to doubters.


Good, assumptions are the enemy.

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malleus discentium
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby malleus discentium » Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:22 pm

redsox wrote:
jlb251 wrote:
redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. So more than half the time. So most.


I guess, with all those words, I have a problem with the way they interact with their antonyms. Is something that is not typical necessarily atypical? Or can it be neither typical nor atypical? Usual/unusual? Normal/abnormal? Is it one or the other, or is there a gap in between?

There is never a "gap" in logical opposites. That's what logical opposite means.

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oxie
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby oxie » Wed Oct 09, 2013 11:28 pm

malleus discentium wrote:
redsox wrote:
jlb251 wrote:
redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. So more than half the time. So most.


I guess, with all those words, I have a problem with the way they interact with their antonyms. Is something that is not typical necessarily atypical? Or can it be neither typical nor atypical? Usual/unusual? Normal/abnormal? Is it one or the other, or is there a gap in between?

There is never a "gap" in logical opposites. That's what logical opposite means.

I think there can be a "gap" in this case when the probability of something is exactly 50%. To my mind, a coin toss coming up heads, for example, is neither typical nor atypical.

I think maybe some of the confusion comes from the fact that in colloquial usage the "neutral band" (for lack of a better term) between typical and atypical tends to be wider than that precise 50% probability. Most people wouldn't describe something as typical unless it happens, say, 75% of the time. But technically speaking, if the probability is 50.1% or higher, you could say that an outcome is "typical" in that it is what happens most of the time.

All of which still boils down to: typical = most

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redsox
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby redsox » Thu Oct 10, 2013 12:00 am

oxie wrote:
malleus discentium wrote:There is never a "gap" in logical opposites. That's what logical opposite means.

I think there can be a "gap" in this case when the probability of something is exactly 50%. To my mind, a coin toss coming up heads, for example, is neither typical nor atypical.

I think maybe some of the confusion comes from the fact that in colloquial usage the "neutral band" (for lack of a better term) between typical and atypical tends to be wider than that precise 50% probability. Most people wouldn't describe something as typical unless it happens, say, 75% of the time. But technically speaking, if the probability is 50.1% or higher, you could say that an outcome is "typical" in that it is what happens most of the time.

All of which still boils down to: typical = most


I guess what I mean is this: Suppose 40% of cars are black, and 60% of cars are a range of other colors. I agree that it would not be accurate to say, "Cars are typically black." But it would also be misleading to say, "Black cars are atypical." Or to say, "Black cars are abnormal." Or, "Black cars are unusual."

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jordan15
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby jordan15 » Thu Oct 10, 2013 12:05 am

redsox wrote:
jlb251 wrote:
redsox wrote:If it's used in the LSAT to mean "most", that's pretty brutal.


How so? Typically means the same thing as usually. Usually means it's the norm. If something is the norm, it's more likely to be than not to be. So more than half the time. So most.


I guess, with all those words, I have a problem with the way they interact with their antonyms. Is something that is not typical necessarily atypical? Or can it be neither typical nor atypical? Usual/unusual? Normal/abnormal? Is it one or the other, or is there a gap in between?


No. "not typical" =/= atypical.

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jk148706
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby jk148706 » Thu Oct 10, 2013 12:08 am

Most. Problem solved.

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redsox
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby redsox » Thu Oct 10, 2013 12:17 am

jordan15 wrote:
redsox wrote:I guess, with all those words, I have a problem with the way they interact with their antonyms. Is something that is not typical necessarily atypical? Or can it be neither typical nor atypical? Usual/unusual? Normal/abnormal? Is it one or the other, or is there a gap in between?


No. "not typical" =/= atypical.


Agree 100%. That's kind of what I was getting at. The words are all paired colloquially with antonyms that lend themselves to being seen as a complete set, when "atypical" is really just a subset of "not typical".

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malleus discentium
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby malleus discentium » Thu Oct 10, 2013 7:36 pm

redsox wrote:
jordan15 wrote:
redsox wrote:I guess, with all those words, I have a problem with the way they interact with their antonyms. Is something that is not typical necessarily atypical? Or can it be neither typical nor atypical? Usual/unusual? Normal/abnormal? Is it one or the other, or is there a gap in between?


No. "not typical" =/= atypical.


Agree 100%. That's kind of what I was getting at. The words are all paired colloquially with antonyms that lend themselves to being seen as a complete set, when "atypical" is really just a subset of "not typical".


"Atypical" and "not typical" are indeed logical equivalents.

The thing you're "getting at" is not a problem unique to "typical." Words can colloquially mean something different from what they mean logically. "Some," for example, logically includes "all" but colloquially does not. Likewise, "atypical" colloquially suggests a degree of rarity that is greater than would be expected of "not typical," but logically they both mean the same thing: exactly 50% or less.

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redsox
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby redsox » Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:01 pm

malleus discentium wrote:"Atypical" and "not typical" are indeed logical equivalents.

The thing you're "getting at" is not a problem unique to "typical." Words can colloquially mean something different from what they mean logically. "Some," for example, logically includes "all" but colloquially does not. Likewise, "atypical" colloquially suggests a degree of rarity that is greater than would be expected of "not typical," but logically they both mean the same thing: exactly 50% or less.


I assume you'd say the same thing about "abnormal" and "unusual"?

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jordan15
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Re: Does "typically" mean "most" or "some"?

Postby jordan15 » Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:26 pm

malleus discentium wrote:
redsox wrote:
jordan15 wrote:
redsox wrote:I guess, with all those words, I have a problem with the way they interact with their antonyms. Is something that is not typical necessarily atypical? Or can it be neither typical nor atypical? Usual/unusual? Normal/abnormal? Is it one or the other, or is there a gap in between?


No. "not typical" =/= atypical.


Agree 100%. That's kind of what I was getting at. The words are all paired colloquially with antonyms that lend themselves to being seen as a complete set, when "atypical" is really just a subset of "not typical".


"Atypical" and "not typical" are indeed logical equivalents.

The thing you're "getting at" is not a problem unique to "typical." Words can colloquially mean something different from what they mean logically. "Some," for example, logically includes "all" but colloquially does not. Likewise, "atypical" colloquially suggests a degree of rarity that is greater than would be expected of "not typical," but logically they both mean the same thing: exactly 50% or less.


LSAT questions will never be that easy though, which is why it's important to know exactly how the words are related to each other. A question which uses the word "typical" could have choices including words like "always," "sometimes," and "never," so when you get a question asking to strengthen or weaken you won't be so lucky to just be able to look for the answer which uses the word "atypical." I think we're getting at the same thing though.




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