Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

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Squintz805
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Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

Postby Squintz805 » Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:07 pm

Im in a conflict between my 2 approaches in LR:

My First Approach: I go at my comfortable pace in a LR section, will miss 2-4 problems usually due to difficulty among a few other things and it takes me 37 minutes to complete.

My Second Approach: This is me going at my pace to get the section done in 35 minutes. I'll come across 2 or 3 problems where I'm stuck. I know I need to keep on moving and cant waste the extra time looking back at the stimulus to get myself at the correct answer choice. This usually ends up costing me to miss 2 more problems then going at my comfortable pace. Could I possibly be better off skipping 1 question that will be time consuming to make the extra time in getting 2 more correct?

What's the best way to resolve this issue. What has worked for you in getting to the correct answer choice without having to refer back. I know I'm missing something on the first read through on the stimulus. Should I maybe be reading the stimulus a bit slower?

magickware
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Re: Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

Postby magickware » Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:31 pm

First pass- Skip everything that you know will take anymore than a minute.
Second pass- Do those that you skipped.

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mindarmed
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Re: Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

Postby mindarmed » Mon Sep 23, 2013 9:52 pm

magickware wrote:First pass- Skip everything that you know will take anymore than a minute.
Second pass- Do those that you skipped.


CR

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Jeffort
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Re: Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

Postby Jeffort » Tue Sep 24, 2013 12:04 am

It's not only ok to re-read the stimulus one last time when you have it down to two answer choices, it is recommended so that you re-fresh your memory of the subtle details involved in the argument that at least one of the two answers probably plays on in order to be able to more clearly see how it relates and if it is correct/incorrect.

After processing the subject matter of an argument, processing its structure/reasoning and evaluating the answer choices at least once you are unlikely to have the subtle (seemingly unimportant on first read) details at the front of your mind that are important to see in relation to what an answer choice says to clearly understand how it relates. Quickly refreshing your memory of the qualifier/detail words can help you quickly see a connection/relationship an answer choice has to the stimulus you didn't see the first time you consider the answer.
It should only take at most 10-15 seconds if that to re-read the stimulus and refresh your memory of the details/nuances since you have already read and analyzed the argument so are not starting from ground zero. It would be silly not to double check if it has a good chance of making the difference between correct answer and incorrect answer when you have it down to two.

I think you are more likely talking about staying on a problem too long and re-reading stuff in situations where you feel lost after first read and go through of the answers. If you feel lost on a question and aren't getting very far honing in on contender answers, that is a different situation where cutting your losses and moving on would be the recommended course of action.

The other related issue that you are probably also talking about is situations with a big and/or complicated question that requires more steps than typical to break down and solve, thus being a time trap/time suck. Parallel reasoning and principle application questions sometimes act as time traps. If a particular problem looks like it is going to take a long time to break apart and solve before you even begin and you are short on time, then it may be appropriate to skip it and come back if you have time. Situations like these involve split second time management decisions before you get too far involved/invested in trying to solve a question.

Deciding to skip the last re-read of the stimulus step on questions you have already analyzed and gotten down to two contender answers isn't generally wise if it could tip the scales in favor of one of the answers over the other since you have already invested time to get that far, making another ~15 seconds worthwhile if it helps you get it right. Basically, don't risk throwing away over a minute of analysis to save ~15 or less seconds if you are close with two contenders and need a basis for deciding which one to go with.

Deciding between the last two answers (meaning you are probably trying to avoid picking the attractive trap answer and it is probably one of the two you have left and are deciding between!!!) purely from memory of the stimulus is a great way to increase the chances that you will pick the trap answer and get it wrong!!!!! People waste lots of time on questions debating the final two answers they have it narrowed down to, and typically just compare the answers to each other to make the decision instead of using that same time to instead compare each of the answers to the stimulus and Q stem instead of to each other. So, instead of wasting time re-reading and debating answer choices you've narrowed a problem down to in order to find a way to decide, use your time better by re-reading the stimulus, then re-read the answers to make the decision.

Most people don't realize how much time they waste per section re-reading and comparing answer choices to each other when down to two instead of simply just re-reading the stimulus for a quick detail refresher to make sure you are considering all the relevant info when making the ultimate final decision.

I hope the context of what I am talking about makes sense here.

magickware
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Re: Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

Postby magickware » Tue Sep 24, 2013 12:58 am

Jeffort wrote:Deciding between the last two answers (meaning you are probably trying to avoid picking the attractive trap answer and it is probably one of the two you have left and are deciding between!!!) purely from memory of the stimulus is a great way to increase the chances that you will pick the trap answer and get it wrong!!!!! People waste lots of time on questions debating the final two answers they have it narrowed down to, and typically just compare the answers to each other to make the decision instead of using that same time to instead compare each of the answers to the stimulus and Q stem instead of to each other. So, instead of wasting time re-reading and debating answer choices you've narrowed a problem down to in order to find a way to decide, use your time better by re-reading the stimulus, then re-read the answers to make the decision.

Most people don't realize how much time they waste per section re-reading and comparing answer choices to each other when down to two instead of simply just re-reading the stimulus for a quick detail refresher to make sure you are considering all the relevant info when making the ultimate final decision.


Word. I think this is the single biggest reason why I can't seem to ever get a combined -0 on LR. I tend to compare answers to one another for difficult questions when I should be looking at them individually instead.

Maybe I should get an extra large eraser that I can use to cover up answers when I'm down to 2, so that I can judge them on their own.

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Squintz805
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Re: Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

Postby Squintz805 » Tue Sep 24, 2013 2:35 am

magickware wrote:
Jeffort wrote:Deciding between the last two answers (meaning you are probably trying to avoid picking the attractive trap answer and it is probably one of the two you have left and are deciding between!!!) purely from memory of the stimulus is a great way to increase the chances that you will pick the trap answer and get it wrong!!!!! People waste lots of time on questions debating the final two answers they have it narrowed down to, and typically just compare the answers to each other to make the decision instead of using that same time to instead compare each of the answers to the stimulus and Q stem instead of to each other. So, instead of wasting time re-reading and debating answer choices you've narrowed a problem down to in order to find a way to decide, use your time better by re-reading the stimulus, then re-read the answers to make the decision.

Most people don't realize how much time they waste per section re-reading and comparing answer choices to each other when down to two instead of simply just re-reading the stimulus for a quick detail refresher to make sure you are considering all the relevant info when making the ultimate final decision.


Word. I think this is the single biggest reason why I can't seem to ever get a combined -0 on LR. I tend to compare answers to one another for difficult questions when I should be looking at them individually instead.

Maybe I should get an extra large eraser that I can use to cover up answers when I'm down to 2, so that I can judge them on their own.


This is gold.

Everything you mentioned is a gold mine of information for my situation. When I Blind Review the section, I constantly see the mistakes I make and for the most part identify what the correct a/c actually is. Its frustrating because I feel I'm competent enough to miss 1-3 per section instead of the 4-5 I usually end up with. I feel confident when i say the time strain is the only thing holding me back.

Is it possible I'm getting overwhelmed in situations where I'm stuck on an answer choice; and instead of taking the next step necessary to getting the correct answer, I lose focus on utilizing my methods/approaches to solving the question?

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Jeffort
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Re: Whats the best in resolving my LR problem.

Postby Jeffort » Tue Sep 24, 2013 3:42 am

Squintz805 wrote:
Is it possible I'm getting overwhelmed in situations where I'm stuck on an answer choice; and instead of taking the next step necessary to getting the correct answer, I lose focus on utilizing my methods/approaches to solving the question?


A big resounding YES!! That is an extremely common reason for mistakes people typically write off as being careless errors.

With a couple of students I'm currently tutoring for the Oct test and doing thorough PT reviews with to figure out every single mistake and the cause of it to get them ready for test day, this is currently the #1 most commonly re-occurring reason for missed LR questions as it typically is with most high performing people close to test day. It very often comes down to failing to take one last important step to validate which answer is correct. The reason students give is almost always "I knew I should have done that but looked at time, was rushed and didn't think I should spare the time".

I'm glad you find the info I posted valuable and will make use of it! People don't often realize the overall score difference just a few basic but really important strategy tactics can make, especially in the LR sections. There is much more to performing well overall than just understanding and being able to apply the concepts and problem solving techniques well to questions individually. The execution of things under timed conditions for time management purposes in ways that also preserves accuracy is an almost entirely different set of LSAT skills to learn than just how to solve particular questions and question types.




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