The Relationship between Conditional Logic and Formal Logic

Is Conditional Logic, as it appears on the LSAT, a subset of Formal Logic?

Yes
1
50%
No
1
50%
 
Total votes: 2

KingofSplitters55
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun May 13, 2012 7:40 pm

The Relationship between Conditional Logic and Formal Logic

Postby KingofSplitters55 » Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:57 pm

I came upon this thought this morning while thinking about both types of logic as they appear on the LSAT. Perhaps my thoughts/insights can be of use to others in being able to better grasp both.

Isn't conditional logic, as it appears on the LSAT, in fact a sub-set of formal logic? Conditional Logic (in terms of if A, then B [A->B], [-B -> -A]) can also be expressed in an exactly equivalent way as "All A are B" and "All Not-B are Not-A". Conditional Logic does not use the "most" and "some" that appear in other sections of formal logic (as it appears on the LSAT), but does seem to in fact be merely subsets of when formal logic chains use entirely "all" or "none" relationships.

What do others think?

From a non-scientific sampling of browsing these forums, it seems more people have trouble with formal logic than conditional logic. By showing that these two are linked intrinsically, perhaps this can help people build their understanding of both better.

KingofSplitters55
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun May 13, 2012 7:40 pm

Re: The Relationship between Conditional Logic and Formal Logic

Postby KingofSplitters55 » Mon Sep 09, 2013 6:58 am

Well?

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mhaas
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Re: The Relationship between Conditional Logic and Formal Logic

Postby mhaas » Mon Sep 09, 2013 10:46 am

KingofSplitters55 wrote:Well?


Please repeat the question.

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homestyle28
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Re: The Relationship between Conditional Logic and Formal Logic

Postby homestyle28 » Mon Sep 09, 2013 11:06 am

What you're calling "formal logic" is usually called syllogistic logic (b/c All As are red, Bob is an A, therefore Bob is red) is a syllogism. Formal logic as a distinct category isn't really a thing to actual logicians. And no you can't collapse the conditional into a syllogism.




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