Questions on My LR Approach

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XicaDaSilva
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Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 1:28 am

Questions on My LR Approach

Postby XicaDaSilva » Wed Sep 04, 2013 9:39 pm

Hey TLS,

I swear I'm not being a lazy bum by posting this, but I'm having a hard time finding the answers to my questions by using the "Forum Search" function. I wanted to get some input/advice on my current approach to LR question types.

1. Stimulus or question stem first: what seems to be the most efficient way for you to attack LR?

2. I've gone through the LRB, so now that I have the general concepts, I've begun drilling each question type as I read each chapter of MLSAT. How many sets (and how many in each set) should I do per question type? All of them? Should I do more than one set in a day? FYI: I'm currently doing LR questions by difficulty level in sets of 24, two sets a day. Do I need to save some of the questions to do a mixed difficulty set for each question type?

3. How should I review? I currently push the end timer button, and then immediately use the answer sheet to check my set. I then go through every question (correct or incorrect) and figure out why each answer choice is right/wrong. The problem I have with this is sometimes I don't exactly follow the strategies in the MLSAT and LRB, so I can't always say it in the clear cut defined way that they do.

4. When did you start transitioning to timed sections? Did you do it while you drilled each question type or did you wait to do timed sections until you started mixed review? Right now, I'm averaging 26.09 minutes on sets of 24 at -2 or -3, but I'm positive it is because I have not gotten to the question types that give me the most trouble yet. I don't "time" myself, as in give myself a time limit, but I do use a timer to see how long it is taking me to complete 24 questions.

Okay, I think that is it, folks! Help ya girl break 170 on this thang, haha. :wink:

Kimikho
Posts: 3971
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 7:01 pm

Re: Questions on My LR Approach

Postby Kimikho » Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:26 pm

XicaDaSilva wrote:Hey TLS,

I swear I'm not being a lazy bum by posting this, but I'm having a hard time finding the answers to my questions by using the "Forum Search" function. I wanted to get some input/advice on my current approach to LR question types.

1. Stimulus or question stem first: what seems to be the most efficient way for you to attack LR?

2. I've gone through the LRB, so now that I have the general concepts, I've begun drilling each question type as I read each chapter of MLSAT. How many sets (and how many in each set) should I do per question type? All of them? Should I do more than one set in a day? FYI: I'm currently doing LR questions by difficulty level in sets of 24, two sets a day. Do I need to save some of the questions to do a mixed difficulty set for each question type?

3. How should I review? I currently push the end timer button, and then immediately use the answer sheet to check my set. I then go through every question (correct or incorrect) and figure out why each answer choice is right/wrong. The problem I have with this is sometimes I don't exactly follow the strategies in the MLSAT and LRB, so I can't always say it in the clear cut defined way that they do.

4. When did you start transitioning to timed sections? Did you do it while you drilled each question type or did you wait to do timed sections until you started mixed review? Right now, I'm averaging 26.09 minutes on sets of 24 at -2 or -3, but I'm positive it is because I have not gotten to the question types that give me the most trouble yet. I don't "time" myself, as in give myself a time limit, but I do use a timer to see how long it is taking me to complete 24 questions.

Okay, I think that is it, folks! Help ya girl break 170 on this thang, haha. :wink:


1.) I read the stem first. I do this because, one, I'd rather have to reread the stem than the stim because the stem is shorter, and two, the stem tells me if I need to attack the question from a logic point of view or if I'm looking at it passively.

2.) If you are using Cambridge, you don't need to save any because Cambridge packets only go up until test 40. Drill until you feel like you could do the problem in your sleep. You don't want to go into the test thinking "man I hope there aren't many sufficient assumption questions!"

3.) I am shit at reviewing, but most people do blind review. I tend to get really impatient during it though :/.

4.) viewtopic.php?f=6&t=216010

Good luck!

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XicaDaSilva
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 1:28 am

Re: Questions on My LR Approach

Postby XicaDaSilva » Thu Sep 05, 2013 12:16 am

scoobers wrote:
1.) I read the stem first. I do this because, one, I'd rather have to reread the stem than the stim because the stem is shorter, and two, the stem tells me if I need to attack the question from a logic point of view or if I'm looking at it passively.

2.) If you are using Cambridge, you don't need to save any because Cambridge packets only go up until test 40. Drill until you feel like you could do the problem in your sleep. You don't want to go into the test thinking "man I hope there aren't many sufficient assumption questions!"

3.) I am shit at reviewing, but most people do blind review. I tend to get really impatient during it though :/.

4.) viewtopic.php?f=6&t=216010

Good luck!


Thanks soooooo much for that link to 7Sage...that is EXACTLY what I needed to see. Though, I think I will get a little impatient with the process as well. Anyone else find success using the 7Sage Blind Review process?

Is it sufficient to grade the set, go through and understand my reasoning for the wrong/right answers? I am taking the Dec. exam, so I don't want to spend too much time on this as I need to still have to go through games, RC and PTing.

magickware
Posts: 359
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2012 1:27 pm

Re: Questions on My LR Approach

Postby magickware » Thu Sep 05, 2013 12:18 am

You could take the premise behind blind review (thoroughly understanding the question) and just use it after you've seen the answer.

Granted, that takes away a lot of its power, since you build absolute certainty that something is an answer is the whole point of it, but you'll still see progress if you take the time to review things properly and understanding why A is wrong and B is right and so forth.

bp shinners
Posts: 3091
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:05 pm

Re: Questions on My LR Approach

Postby bp shinners » Thu Sep 05, 2013 2:16 pm

XicaDaSilva wrote:1. Stimulus or question stem first: what seems to be the most efficient way for you to attack LR?


Stem first, every time. You wouldn't try to find Waldo without knowing what he looked like, and those are stupid kid books. Why waste time trying to find a flaw in a main point question?

2. I've gone through the LRB, so now that I have the general concepts, I've begun drilling each question type as I read each chapter of MLSAT. How many sets (and how many in each set) should I do per question type? All of them? Should I do more than one set in a day? FYI: I'm currently doing LR questions by difficulty level in sets of 24, two sets a day. Do I need to save some of the questions to do a mixed difficulty set for each question type?


I would not go back to mixed difficulty for a question type. I would get through the question sets you have and then use actual sections to simulate mixed question type and difficulty.

3. How should I review? I currently push the end timer button, and then immediately use the answer sheet to check my set. I then go through every question (correct or incorrect) and figure out why each answer choice is right/wrong. The problem I have with this is sometimes I don't exactly follow the strategies in the MLSAT and LRB, so I can't always say it in the clear cut defined way that they do.


On top of the questions you're already answering, also answer these two:
1) What about the right answer made me think it was wrong? This will show you the tricks you're falling for that the LSAT uses to get you to disregard a correct answer. Bonus points if you can phrase it as one of the common fallacies.
2) What about the wrong answer made me think it was right? You fell for another trick when you picked the wrong answer choice. They made it tempting to you in some way. Figure out how they did that and why it doesn't make the answer correct.

4. When did you start transitioning to timed sections? Did you do it while you drilled each question type or did you wait to do timed sections until you started mixed review? Right now, I'm averaging 26.09 minutes on sets of 24 at -2 or -3, but I'm positive it is because I have not gotten to the question types that give me the most trouble yet. I don't "time" myself, as in give myself a time limit, but I do use a timer to see how long it is taking me to complete 24 questions.


Don't start timing things until you get to mixed sections. It's a lot easier and quicker when you know the question type and when your brain doesn't have to switch between strategies. As such, the timing isn't as useful as when you start doing mixed sections and need to adjust after each one.




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