People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

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dr123
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby dr123 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:09 pm

crestor wrote:And I'm pretty sure the average 1L is 25 years old when he starts. You wonder why.. :mrgreen:


Or she, check your privilege.

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rinkrat19
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby rinkrat19 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:10 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:She's worried or believes the stigma that once people stop going to school they don't go back...but the thing she is missing is that I didn't drop out. I just haven't started and I thin it will be best to start later.

I know I am the adult, but I have a few worries, well one thing is that I highly value my mothers opinion. She as never steered my wrong. She doesn't think the idea is bad...she thinks its smart and makes sense, she just is worried about me...so that brought my confidence down.

Now my main concern is that I feel like I failed somehow. I feel like I should have been able to ace the test and apply his fall. I foolish believe that I am somehow inadequate.

as for who is fitting the bill? I wanted scholarships but lsat score needs to be in order. therefore no mother was not planning to pay...but i still value her opinion,bc we are really close...but it can also be a 20 yr old dependency issue still. as if I still need approval from my mom kind of thing.

Look, I'm really close with my dad. But I didn't fall into a fit of despondency when he initially expressed doubt about my plan of not attending Lewis & Clark but in fact deferring a year and attending Northwestern. I laid out the facts and he was convinced. No matter how much you wuv your mommy, her advice MEANS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING if she is not operating with full information. When she has all the facts, then her opinion can be considered.

You need to get over this pearl-clutching, hand-wringing ZOMG I AM A FAILURE stuff. Someone who takes longer but gets a great score and eventually attends a better school is far less of a "failure" than someone who gets a mediocre score on their first try and just attends whatever school. Plenty of very successful law students take a year or more to study for the LSAT, sometimes taking the test 2-3-4 times before they reach their potential.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:20 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:She's worried or believes the stigma that once people stop going to school they don't go back...but the thing she is missing is that I didn't drop out. I just haven't started and I thin it will be best to start later.

I know I am the adult, but I have a few worries, well one thing is that I highly value my mothers opinion. She as never steered my wrong. She doesn't think the idea is bad...she thinks its smart and makes sense, she just is worried about me...so that brought my confidence down.

Now my main concern is that I feel like I failed somehow. I feel like I should have been able to ace the test and apply his fall. I foolish believe that I am somehow inadequate.

as for who is fitting the bill? I wanted scholarships but lsat score needs to be in order. therefore no mother was not planning to pay...but i still value her opinion,bc we are really close...but it can also be a 20 yr old dependency issue still. as if I still need approval from my mom kind of thing.

Look, I'm really close with my dad. But I didn't fall into a fit of despondency when he initially expressed doubt about my plan of not attending Lewis & Clark but in fact deferring a year and attending Northwestern. I laid out the facts and he was convinced. No matter how much you wuv your mommy, her advice MEANS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING if she is not operating with full information. When she has all the facts, then her opinion can be considered.

You need to get over this pearl-clutching, hand-wringing ZOMG I AM A FAILURE stuff. Someone who takes longer but gets a great score and eventually attends a better school is far less of a "failure" than someone who gets a mediocre score on their first try and just attends whatever school. Plenty of very successful law students take a year or more to study for the LSAT, sometimes taking the test 2-3-4 times before they reach their potential.



You are absolutely right. I have to do what is best and I know more than her currently about my situation. I have anxiety so I do seem to make things an issue when I shouldn't. Case in point I've only taken one practice test and I am not even half way trough my Manhattan course but I call myself a failure.

My biggest fear is that even though I practice I won't improve!! GASP. I know it sounds silly and it's probably another anxiety ridden issue but it still gnaws at me...

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rinkrat19
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby rinkrat19 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:25 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:She's worried or believes the stigma that once people stop going to school they don't go back...but the thing she is missing is that I didn't drop out. I just haven't started and I thin it will be best to start later.

I know I am the adult, but I have a few worries, well one thing is that I highly value my mothers opinion. She as never steered my wrong. She doesn't think the idea is bad...she thinks its smart and makes sense, she just is worried about me...so that brought my confidence down.

Now my main concern is that I feel like I failed somehow. I feel like I should have been able to ace the test and apply his fall. I foolish believe that I am somehow inadequate.

as for who is fitting the bill? I wanted scholarships but lsat score needs to be in order. therefore no mother was not planning to pay...but i still value her opinion,bc we are really close...but it can also be a 20 yr old dependency issue still. as if I still need approval from my mom kind of thing.

Look, I'm really close with my dad. But I didn't fall into a fit of despondency when he initially expressed doubt about my plan of not attending Lewis & Clark but in fact deferring a year and attending Northwestern. I laid out the facts and he was convinced. No matter how much you wuv your mommy, her advice MEANS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING if she is not operating with full information. When she has all the facts, then her opinion can be considered.

You need to get over this pearl-clutching, hand-wringing ZOMG I AM A FAILURE stuff. Someone who takes longer but gets a great score and eventually attends a better school is far less of a "failure" than someone who gets a mediocre score on their first try and just attends whatever school. Plenty of very successful law students take a year or more to study for the LSAT, sometimes taking the test 2-3-4 times before they reach their potential.



You are absolutely right. I have to do what is best and I know more than her currently about my situation. I have anxiety so I do seem to make things an issue when I shouldn't. Case in point I've only taken one practice test and I am not even half way trough my Manhattan course but I call myself a failure.

My biggest fear is that even though I practice I won't improve!! GASP. I know it sounds silly and it's probably another anxiety ridden issue but it still gnaws at me...

Are you getting help for this anxiety? It's not going to magically go away in law school. In your current state, it sounds like you'd flip your shit trying to decide what kind of backpack to buy, let alone taking an exam. All the more reason to take a year to work stuff out on a personal level as well as academic.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:30 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:She's worried or believes the stigma that once people stop going to school they don't go back...but the thing she is missing is that I didn't drop out. I just haven't started and I thin it will be best to start later.

I know I am the adult, but I have a few worries, well one thing is that I highly value my mothers opinion. She as never steered my wrong. She doesn't think the idea is bad...she thinks its smart and makes sense, she just is worried about me...so that brought my confidence down.

Now my main concern is that I feel like I failed somehow. I feel like I should have been able to ace the test and apply his fall. I foolish believe that I am somehow inadequate.

as for who is fitting the bill? I wanted scholarships but lsat score needs to be in order. therefore no mother was not planning to pay...but i still value her opinion,bc we are really close...but it can also be a 20 yr old dependency issue still. as if I still need approval from my mom kind of thing.

Look, I'm really close with my dad. But I didn't fall into a fit of despondency when he initially expressed doubt about my plan of not attending Lewis & Clark but in fact deferring a year and attending Northwestern. I laid out the facts and he was convinced. No matter how much you wuv your mommy, her advice MEANS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING if she is not operating with full information. When she has all the facts, then her opinion can be considered.

You need to get over this pearl-clutching, hand-wringing ZOMG I AM A FAILURE stuff. Someone who takes longer but gets a great score and eventually attends a better school is far less of a "failure" than someone who gets a mediocre score on their first try and just attends whatever school. Plenty of very successful law students take a year or more to study for the LSAT, sometimes taking the test 2-3-4 times before they reach their potential.



You are absolutely right. I have to do what is best and I know more than her currently about my situation. I have anxiety so I do seem to make things an issue when I shouldn't. Case in point I've only taken one practice test and I am not even half way trough my Manhattan course but I call myself a failure.

My biggest fear is that even though I practice I won't improve!! GASP. I know it sounds silly and it's probably another anxiety ridden issue but it still gnaws at me...

Are you getting help for this anxiety? It's not going to magically go away in law school. In your current state, it sounds like you'd flip your shit trying to decide what kind of backpack to buy, let alone taking an exam. All the more reason to take a year to work stuff out on a personal level as well as academic.



lmao I tend to only flip shit when it comes to school work...and when I'm afraid....for example something bad happens to a fam member or friend... but I agree it will only get worse in law school. I see a therapist now to talk tings out so I wont stress...well it is a school therapist and I won't be back at school till 8/25/ lol

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SteelPenguin
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby SteelPenguin » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:56 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:Okay I see what you guys are saying...wait a cycle...but to me that sounds so scary. My family is expecting law school straight from undergrad. I think I will disappoint them so much... Also does that look bad when a student takes a year or waits months after undergrad graduation to apply for law school?


Waiting a year and improving a few LSAT points can make a tremendous difference. I really didn't want to retake after getting my score in December, but I eventually realized it was the right choice. Last cycle, I was rejected from every T14 I applied to, but with my new score, I'm hoping for a decent scholarship from some T14 schools. The school you go to and the amount of scholarship money you receive are very much worth waiting an extra year for.

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CardozoLaw09
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby CardozoLaw09 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:58 pm

Can't really add much to what Rinkrat - humorously - already pointed out; but you haven't spent enough time with the LSAT yet to be so nervous about your potential; one practice test means virtually nothing. Get that anxiety in check, take an year off to prep, and kill it sometime next year.

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Dr. Dre
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Dr. Dre » Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:08 am

OP just take the LSAT this december...

keep studying and use this
http://www.amazon.com/The-LSAT-Trainer- ... 0989081508


when you're down, listen to this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jf_L9TImDUs

don't let the LSAT get down down lil breh, you got this

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objection_your_honor
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby objection_your_honor » Thu Aug 22, 2013 1:25 pm

From the tone of these posts it sounds like you should take a year off and pay for your own bills just to gain some autonomy from your parents.

It only helps your application, too. Higher LSAT score + full time work experience.

Kimikho
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Kimikho » Thu Aug 22, 2013 4:00 pm

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Last edited by Kimikho on Thu Dec 19, 2013 5:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:00 pm

Dr. Dre wrote:OP just take the LSAT this december...

keep studying and use this
http://www.amazon.com/The-LSAT-Trainer- ... 0989081508


when you're down, listen to this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jf_L9TImDUs

don't let the LSAT get down down lil breh, you got this


Ill keep studying...I think my biggest downfall is fear and anxiety...when I get a few questions wrong I panic. I'm mostly panicking bc I'm not occupying my mind with anything else but the lsat. I think if I study at a nice pace for 3 months...during school and work it will be better. I will have things to take my mind of the lsat..hang with friends... And pace myself better.

I guess it wouldnt hurt to invest $40 more dollars on another prep book....AHHH lol it sounds so insane when you think about how much I spent.

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Dr. Dre
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Dr. Dre » Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:03 pm

The amount of money you will spend for LSAT prep is nothing to the amount of money you could receive with a high LSAT score (169 or higher, since the 169 is the new 170).

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:21 pm

Dr. Dre wrote:The amount of money you will spend for LSAT prep is nothing to the amount of money you could receive with a high LSAT score (169 or higher, since the 169 is the new 170).


Your absolutely right. Do you think that a 3.76 hopefully graduating with a 3.81 is a good gpa for someone looking into the top 14 schools specifically Columbia assuming that I achieve a 169+

Also do you feel the LSAT TRAINER does a superior job breaking concepts down than Manhattan. I feel manhattan is very dry and more difficult for me to understand....to give a comparison is it similar to Blueprint in its delivery..bc I respond well to BP...wish they had a comprehensive book instead of just logic games.

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SteelPenguin
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby SteelPenguin » Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:27 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:
Dr. Dre wrote:The amount of money you will spend for LSAT prep is nothing to the amount of money you could receive with a high LSAT score (169 or higher, since the 169 is the new 170).


Your absolutely right. Do you think that a 3.76 hopefully graduating with a 3.81 is a good gpa for someone looking into the top 14 schools specifically Columbia assuming that I achieve a 169+

Also do you feel the LSAT TRAINER does a superior job breaking concepts down than Manhattan. I feel manhattan is very dry and more difficult for me to understand....to give a comparison is it similar to Blueprint in its delivery..bc I respond well to BP...wish they had a comprehensive book instead of just logic games.


I've never tried BP, but I've used Manhattan RC and LG, and I'm over halfway through the LSAT Trainer. While I thought Manhattan was good at laying out the big picture in RC and LGs, I believe LSAT Trainer goes into more depth and covers details better. Your GPA is above Columbia's median as well most of the T14. A 169 will give you a good shot at Penn down, but for Columbia you're probably going to want something closer to a 171 or 172.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Thu Aug 22, 2013 7:08 pm

SteelPenguin wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:
Dr. Dre wrote:The amount of money you will spend for LSAT prep is nothing to the amount of money you could receive with a high LSAT score (169 or higher, since the 169 is the new 170).


Your absolutely right. Do you think that a 3.76 hopefully graduating with a 3.81 is a good gpa for someone looking into the top 14 schools specifically Columbia assuming that I achieve a 169+

Also do you feel the LSAT TRAINER does a superior job breaking concepts down than Manhattan. I feel manhattan is very dry and more difficult for me to understand....to give a comparison is it similar to Blueprint in its delivery..bc I respond well to BP...wish they had a comprehensive book instead of just logic games.


I've never tried BP, but I've used Manhattan RC and LG, and I'm over halfway through the LSAT Trainer. While I thought Manhattan was good at laying out the big picture in RC and LGs, I believe LSAT Trainer goes into more depth and covers details better. Your GPA is above Columbia's median as well most of the T14. A 169 will give you a good shot at Penn down, but for Columbia you're probably going to want something closer to a 171 or 172.


Wow okay thanks...I just have to give it my all....and I will try LSAT trainer

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TheSpanishMain
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby TheSpanishMain » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:30 am

OP, don't take this the wrong way, but you really, really need to take time off. Rinkrat nailed it. You come off as an immature, easily influenced 20 year who doesn't really understand what you're getting into. Even the way you write screams "kid" in some way I can't quite put my finger on.

That's not an insult. Everyone is immature when they're 20. It is, however, all the more reason for you to do something else for a few years, grow up, figure out what exactly you want to do, and most importantly, be an independent adult.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Fri Aug 23, 2013 3:43 pm

TheSpanishMain wrote:OP, don't take this the wrong way, but you really, really need to take time off. Rinkrat nailed it. You come off as an immature, easily influenced 20 year who doesn't really understand what you're getting into. Even the way you write screams "kid" in some way I can't quite put my finger on.

That's not an insult. Everyone is immature when they're 20. It is, however, all the more reason for you to do something else for a few years, grow up, figure out what exactly you want to do, and most importantly, be an independent adult.


I can see the immaturity...in myself....sometimes I can be totally unrealistic regarding myself and my situation. I tend to think that small setbacks, when I make mistakes, and when things don't go exactly as planned as negative and warrenting a I flip out session, but I'm slowly realizing that life didn't promise perfection and mistakes should be welcomed....in a sense.

I do think that I will at least try the exam in December...bc I have to try. That gives me three more months to take my time...collect myself....understand my strengths and weaknesses work on them....and grow up a little...and understand that my best doesnt mean THE best.

magickware
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby magickware » Fri Aug 23, 2013 8:41 pm

You never said how you're scoring right now, iirc.

So, how are you scoring right now? What are your biggest weaknesses and what are you doing to fix them?

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Jeffort
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Jeffort » Fri Aug 23, 2013 8:59 pm

age, maturity and life experience issues aside, OP is having a common reaction many people have after they hit or pass the half way through point in a prep course and unrealistically think their performance level should have drastically improved in the several weeks they've been learning the ins and outs of the fundamentals of the test.

OP, its totally normal to not see drastic improvement early in a prep course while you are still learning the basics. It takes a good amount of time to even learn all the major question types and other basics of the test let alone learn solid strategies and get good at applying them. LSAT improvement doesn't happen at a consistent linear rate for most people and everyone is different in terms of how quickly they are able to master the important skills.

Part of what you are having is your first reality outside of UG alert by facing the first test you couldn't get a high grade on just from a bunch of cramming like you've been able to do with everything else in school up to now. Welcome to world beyond UG tests, it's different out here! the LSAT is difficult to improve on!

Just realign your expectations with the reality of the LSAT. It takes most people a lot of study and practice time (months) to end up achieving a high score on test day. High scores do not come easy just from taking a class and/or putting in some study time and effort. It is hard like that for pretty much everyone so just realize that's reality that is nothing personal about you. Bottom line, it takes a lot of time and effort to substantially improve ones LSAT score. If you get freaked out and deterred by difficult things/challenges, you will not like the going to law school process at all since EVERYTHING is a fierce competition against a bunch of other smart motivated people that don't fall apart when challenged.
Last edited by Jeffort on Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ManoftheHour
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby ManoftheHour » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:08 pm

If your parents are paying your bills: Sit them down, show them articles and articles explaining how bad the market is and how important the LSAT is to your career.

If your parents are not paying your bills: F$&@ them. Do what you want, and TCR is to apply with the best score possible, even if it means sitting out a year or two.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby bizzybone1313 » Sun Aug 25, 2013 5:35 pm

Good luck.

ampm
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby ampm » Thu Sep 12, 2013 7:13 pm

OP, read this: http://www.reddit.com/r/LSAT/comments/1 ... ltime_and/
That is my story. Read point number 7.

It is not a badge of honor to try to claim that you must be perfect or you've failed. Those people will face brutal reality checks later on in life. I'm not trying to be harsh but you asked what worked for me. I'm telling you.

I used to be of the same opinion as you. Scared about failure and what my family and friends would think. Then I stopped caring. Then I took the lsat.

The best entrepreneurs and the ones whose fame endures were the ones who failed over and over again.




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