People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Blueberrypie
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People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:25 pm

I have never felt this low about anything before. I'm just not getting it. I spent over 1200 on a Manhattan lsat course and while i feel it helps with games...my logical reasoning has suffered tremendously. I never felt so lousy. This test is beating the crap out of me, and killing my dreams. Well I suppose after so much trial and error I feel defeated. I used to have an upbeat attitude but after constant wrong answers I am doubting my capabilities, and whether I'm actually smart enough to be a lawyer...or beat this test.

I do have anxiety problem, but after doing a practice run of LR questions I get all of them wrong.. I did about 8 questions...I start to panic, and then when I look at the right answer I can't see why it is right, and my answer is wrong.

It also makes me reluctant to study, bc of the fear of failure. I don't fail ever...so its one of those thins that scares me to the core. What scares me more I think is that I wont be ready in Oct. and then I cant apply early decision to my favorite school. I worked so hard to make my gpa stellar and now I feel that my dreams and everything will be crushed....

Has anyone been or currently in such a predicament?

Those who had been in a similar situation how have you overcome it and became better at the LSAT.

RodneyRuxin
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Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby RodneyRuxin » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:28 pm

This will be a struggle for you, but it'll be a learning experience and hopefully you won't have to deal with it during law school (where finals and OCI are equally stressful).

Blueberrypie
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Joined: Tue Jul 30, 2013 9:59 pm

Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:32 pm

RodneyRuxin wrote:This will be a struggle for you, but it'll be a learning experience and hopefully you won't have to deal with it during law school (where finals and OCI are equally stressful).




I hate that its this much of a struggle. I have nervous breakdowns and cry all the time. I wont even touch prep test bc of fear of failure and being confused while taking the test...

NYstate
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby NYstate » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:34 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:I have never felt this low about anything before. I'm just not getting it. I spent over 1200 on a Manhattan lsat course and while i feel it helps with games...my logical reasoning has suffered tremendously. I never felt so lousy. This test is beating the crap out of me, and killing my dreams. Well I suppose after so much trial and error I feel defeated. I used to have an upbeat attitude but after constant wrong answers I am doubting my capabilities, and whether I'm actually smart enough to be a lawyer...or beat this test.

I do have anxiety problem, but after doing a practice run of LR questions I get all of them wrong.. I did about 8 questions...I start to panic, and then when I look at the right answer I can't see why it is right, and my answer is wrong.

It also makes me reluctant to study, bc of the fear of failure. I don't fail ever...so its one of those thins that scares me to the core. What scares me more I think is that I wont be ready in Oct. and then I cant apply early decision to my favorite school. I worked so hard to make my gpa stellar and now I feel that my dreams and everything will be crushed....

Has anyone been or currently in such a predicament?

Those who had been in a similar situation how have you overcome it and became better at the LSAT.


1. Deal with your anxiety

2. use one of the self study guides here and drill questions. it is more important to understand why an answer is wrong than it is to get every question right.

3. Take timed practice tests.

4. You don't have to take in October. You can get a December score. Or you can take October for the experience of taking the test and if you do badly you can cancel.

NYstate
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby NYstate » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:36 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:
RodneyRuxin wrote:This will be a struggle for you, but it'll be a learning experience and hopefully you won't have to deal with it during law school (where finals and OCI are equally stressful).




I hate that its this much of a struggle. I have nervous breakdowns and cry all the time. I wont even touch prep test bc of fear of failure and being confused while taking the test...


You need a break. Take some time off. You are also being too hard on yourself. Everyone needs to learn how to take the exam. There are people here who have studied for a year for the LSAT.

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dr123
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby dr123 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:37 pm

You need to man the fuck up. It's just a test. If you can't take it in October, take the next one. If you can't apply this cycle, then apply the next cycle.

magickware
Posts: 359
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2012 1:27 pm

Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby magickware » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:38 pm

How long have you been studying?

You have no right to question your intelligence/capability until you've studied for a year or more, and that with proper methods proven by hundreds of others instead of using poor ones.

Read these guides-
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=212294
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=195603

Understand what the goal behind those two guides are (mastery through repetition and genuine review) instead of just copying it verbatim, and I cannot imagine anyone getting lower than a 165.

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rinkrat19
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby rinkrat19 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:38 pm

Set up your life so you can take a year or more to gradually get ready for the LSAT. That removes the pressure of prepping by October. Move back home, get a job, whatever. Then deal with that anxiety. The test is important, but the mere thought of studying shouldn't debilitate you. That's not normal.

Then study. Gradually. Make it a hobby, not an obsession. Don't take the test until you're ready. Actually, don't even SCHEDULE the test until you're approaching a goal score range.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:40 pm

NYstate wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:I have never felt this low about anything before. I'm just not getting it. I spent over 1200 on a Manhattan lsat course and while i feel it helps with games...my logical reasoning has suffered tremendously. I never felt so lousy. This test is beating the crap out of me, and killing my dreams. Well I suppose after so much trial and error I feel defeated. I used to have an upbeat attitude but after constant wrong answers I am doubting my capabilities, and whether I'm actually smart enough to be a lawyer...or beat this test.

I do have anxiety problem, but after doing a practice run of LR questions I get all of them wrong.. I did about 8 questions...I start to panic, and then when I look at the right answer I can't see why it is right, and my answer is wrong.

It also makes me reluctant to study, bc of the fear of failure. I don't fail ever...so its one of those thins that scares me to the core. What scares me more I think is that I wont be ready in Oct. and then I cant apply early decision to my favorite school. I worked so hard to make my gpa stellar and now I feel that my dreams and everything will be crushed....

Has anyone been or currently in such a predicament?

Those who had been in a similar situation how have you overcome it and became better at the LSAT.


1. Deal with your anxiety

2. use one of the self study guides here and drill questions. it is more important to understand why an answer is wrong than it is to get every question right.

3. Take timed practice tests.

4. You don't have to take in October. You can get a December score. Or you can take October for the experience of taking the test and if you do badly you can cancel.



I don't have to take it in Oct to apply early decision? I thought everything had o be in by Nov...for early decision including LSAT scores.

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rinkrat19
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby rinkrat19 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:41 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:
NYstate wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:I have never felt this low about anything before. I'm just not getting it. I spent over 1200 on a Manhattan lsat course and while i feel it helps with games...my logical reasoning has suffered tremendously. I never felt so lousy. This test is beating the crap out of me, and killing my dreams. Well I suppose after so much trial and error I feel defeated. I used to have an upbeat attitude but after constant wrong answers I am doubting my capabilities, and whether I'm actually smart enough to be a lawyer...or beat this test.

I do have anxiety problem, but after doing a practice run of LR questions I get all of them wrong.. I did about 8 questions...I start to panic, and then when I look at the right answer I can't see why it is right, and my answer is wrong.

It also makes me reluctant to study, bc of the fear of failure. I don't fail ever...so its one of those thins that scares me to the core. What scares me more I think is that I wont be ready in Oct. and then I cant apply early decision to my favorite school. I worked so hard to make my gpa stellar and now I feel that my dreams and everything will be crushed....

Has anyone been or currently in such a predicament?

Those who had been in a similar situation how have you overcome it and became better at the LSAT.


1. Deal with your anxiety

2. use one of the self study guides here and drill questions. it is more important to understand why an answer is wrong than it is to get every question right.

3. Take timed practice tests.

4. You don't have to take in October. You can get a December score. Or you can take October for the experience of taking the test and if you do badly you can cancel.



I don't have to take it in Oct to apply early decision? I thought everything had o be in by Nov...for early decision including LSAT scores.

We're saying that you don't seem to be ready to study and get where you need to be by October. You need to take longer--as long as you need. It may very well mean waiting a cycle.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:42 pm

dr123 wrote:You need to man the fuck up. It's just a test. If you can't take it in October, take the next one. If you can't apply this cycle, then apply the next cycle.



Ah I love that...you sound just like my mom! I know I need to man the fuck up...I guess this is just a reality check...for someone who learns things very quickly.

Blueberrypie
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:43 pm

Okay I see what you guys are saying...wait a cycle...but to me that sounds so scary. My family is expecting law school straight from undergrad. I think I will disappoint them so much... Also does that look bad when a student takes a year or waits months after undergrad graduation to apply for law school?

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rinkrat19
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby rinkrat19 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:46 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:Okay I see what you guys are saying...wait a cycle...but to me that sounds so scary. My family is expecting law school straight from undergrad. I think I will disappoint them so much... Also does that look bad when a student takes a year or waits months after undergrad graduation to apply for law school?

Considering the average age of law students is like 24-25...you do the math.

Forcing yourself to take the LSAT unprepared and FREAKING THE FUCK OUT should be much "scarier" than just getting a job and waiting a year until you are actually ready. Plus then you won't be a clueless K-JD who's never functioned like a grownup in the real world.

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dr123
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby dr123 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:47 pm

The average law student is like 2 years removed from their college graduation at the time of enrollment. Schools are definitely not going to hold it against you.

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crestor
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby crestor » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:49 pm

magickware wrote:How long have you been studying?

You have no right to question your intelligence/capability until you've studied for a year or more, and that with proper methods proven by hundreds of others instead of using poor ones.

Read these guides-
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=212294
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=195603

Understand what the goal behind those two guides are (mastery through repetition and genuine review) instead of just copying it verbatim, and I cannot imagine anyone getting lower than a 165.


165 is top 5% of test-takers. Anyone... Everyone has a ceiling.

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Otunga
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Otunga » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:51 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:
dr123 wrote:You need to man the fuck up. It's just a test. If you can't take it in October, take the next one. If you can't apply this cycle, then apply the next cycle.



Ah I love that...you sound just like my mom! I know I need to man the fuck up...I guess this is just a reality check...for someone who learns things very quickly.


The LSAT just isn't a test one learns quickly, or at least one doesn't hone the relevant skills quickly. Developing the reasoning skills required to score 170+ on this test takes time. And in addition, you don't only need to develop the relevant reasoning skills - you also need to take a step back regularly and examine your habits as a test-taker. Examining your habits and correcting anything that's holding you back is yet another challenge in one's way.

Blueberrypie
Posts: 156
Joined: Tue Jul 30, 2013 9:59 pm

Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Blueberrypie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:52 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:Okay I see what you guys are saying...wait a cycle...but to me that sounds so scary. My family is expecting law school straight from undergrad. I think I will disappoint them so much... Also does that look bad when a student takes a year or waits months after undergrad graduation to apply for law school?

Considering the average age of law students is like 24-25...you do the math.

Forcing yourself to take the LSAT unprepared and FREAKING THE FUCK OUT should be much "scarier" than just getting a job and waiting a year until you are actually ready. Plus then you won't be a clueless K-JD who's never functioned like a grownup in the real world.


I didn't realize. I thought many were straight from undergrad. How naive. I'm 20 yrs old... I guess I could get a job save some money...intern ad stuff.

Should I get my recommendations before a graduate and just have my professors post date them?

magickware
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby magickware » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:53 pm

crestor wrote:
magickware wrote:How long have you been studying?

You have no right to question your intelligence/capability until you've studied for a year or more, and that with proper methods proven by hundreds of others instead of using poor ones.

Read these guides-
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=212294
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=195603

Understand what the goal behind those two guides are (mastery through repetition and genuine review) instead of just copying it verbatim, and I cannot imagine anyone getting lower than a 165.


165 is top 5% of test-takers. Anyone... Everyone has a ceiling.


And I argued that most people never reach their ceiling for one reason or another.

Did you study for a while with methods that people saw work for them and with some bit of guidance, such as the free 7sage guides/BP Shinners here/MLSAT's forums? If you did those and got a 165, then that's probably your ceiling.

If you haven't, then you don't know where your ceiling is at.

Blueberrypie wrote:Okay I see what you guys are saying...wait a cycle...but to me that sounds so scary. My family is expecting law school straight from undergrad. I think I will disappoint them so much... Also does that look bad when a student takes a year or waits months after undergrad graduation to apply for law school?


LSAT score>A gap year or two/your parents being disappointed.

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dr123
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby dr123 » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:53 pm

Post date them? Why would they do that

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crestor
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby crestor » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:53 pm

Otunga wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:
dr123 wrote:You need to man the fuck up. It's just a test. If you can't take it in October, take the next one. If you can't apply this cycle, then apply the next cycle.



Ah I love that...you sound just like my mom! I know I need to man the fuck up...I guess this is just a reality check...for someone who learns things very quickly.


The LSAT just isn't a test one learns quickly, or at least one doesn't hone the relevant skills quickly. Developing the reasoning skills required to score 170+ on this test takes time. And in addition, you don't only need to develop the relevant reasoning skills - you also need to take a step back regularly and examine your habits as a test-taker. Examining your habits and correcting anything that's holding you back is yet another challenge in one's way.


and then there's not fucking shit up when test-day finally comes around. (june cancelled)

magickware
Posts: 359
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby magickware » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:55 pm

Blueberrypie wrote:I didn't realize. I thought many were straight from undergrad. How naive. I'm 20 yrs old... I guess I could get a job save some money...intern ad stuff.

Should I get my recommendations before a graduate and just have my professors post date them?


LSAC holds any LoR and LSAT score and just about every law school app relevant material for 5 years before they toss them.

Get your LOR sent to LSAC once you graduate and ignore them until you're ready to apply.

I'm not sure if you need to pay for CAS for them to hold stuff for 5 years though.

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Otunga
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Otunga » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:56 pm

20's too young to be overly concerned and anxious about the LSAT.

Maybe do some moderate studying, but please don't cram. You have the opportunity to gradually study for the test, which I think is ideal.

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crestor
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby crestor » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:57 pm

magickware wrote:
crestor wrote:
magickware wrote:How long have you been studying?

You have no right to question your intelligence/capability until you've studied for a year or more, and that with proper methods proven by hundreds of others instead of using poor ones.

Read these guides-
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=212294
http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 6&t=195603

Understand what the goal behind those two guides are (mastery through repetition and genuine review) instead of just copying it verbatim, and I cannot imagine anyone getting lower than a 165.


165 is top 5% of test-takers. Anyone... Everyone has a ceiling.


And I argued that most people never reach their ceiling for one reason or another.

Did you study for a while with methods that people saw work for them and with some bit of guidance, such as the free 7sage guides/BP Shinners here/MLSAT's forums? If you did those and got a 165, then that's probably your ceiling.

If you haven't, then you don't know where your ceiling is at.

Blueberrypie wrote:Okay I see what you guys are saying...wait a cycle...but to me that sounds so scary. My family is expecting law school straight from undergrad. I think I will disappoint them so much... Also does that look bad when a student takes a year or waits months after undergrad graduation to apply for law school?


LSAT score>A gap year or two/your parents being disappointed.



if these people are too lazy to utilize free resources that will drastically improve their LSAT and ie acceptance to law school and scholarship money, then the world is better off.

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Otunga
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Otunga » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:57 pm

crestor wrote:
Otunga wrote:
Blueberrypie wrote:
dr123 wrote:You need to man the fuck up. It's just a test. If you can't take it in October, take the next one. If you can't apply this cycle, then apply the next cycle.



Ah I love that...you sound just like my mom! I know I need to man the fuck up...I guess this is just a reality check...for someone who learns things very quickly.


The LSAT just isn't a test one learns quickly, or at least one doesn't hone the relevant skills quickly. Developing the reasoning skills required to score 170+ on this test takes time. And in addition, you don't only need to develop the relevant reasoning skills - you also need to take a step back regularly and examine your habits as a test-taker. Examining your habits and correcting anything that's holding you back is yet another challenge in one's way.


and then there's not fucking shit up when test-day finally comes around. (june cancelled)


I don't like June PTs. Those damn curves.

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Otunga
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Re: People who have been in my shoes and have overcome it.

Postby Otunga » Wed Aug 21, 2013 6:58 pm

Try to approach your parents and discuss with them the realities of the legal market and applying to law school. Explain to them that you need to maximize your LSAT score to give yourself the best opportunities. Reasonable parents should understand.




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