You know when you need to take a day off when...

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Erickt26
Posts: 84
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 9:47 pm

You know when you need to take a day off when...

Postby Erickt26 » Sun Aug 18, 2013 1:33 pm

YOU DREAM ABOUT THE LSAT

I when to sleep thinking about quantifiers and formal logic after doing some MBT questions during the day. I dreamed that I was taking the real LSAT at my house. The proctor told me to begin-yes I had a proctor at my house! I quickly breezed through the first three sections. There was even question that said "omitted for curve purposes". The proctor told me "be back in 15". I was happy and feeling awesome, I had truly rocked the October LSAT! After coming back from my well deserved break, the proctor is not there! I was unable to take the second half of the LSAT. To make a long story short, the proctor never came back and I was left with the option of retaking the LSAT in December! I was pissed and started to smash everything in my kitchen!

Wow, what a dream. Today, Sunday, I decided after this dream that I need to take a day off!

If the LSAT begins to invade your dreams that a serious sign that you are close to burning out.

WanderingPondering
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Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2012 10:47 am

Re: You know when you need to take a day off when...

Postby WanderingPondering » Sun Aug 18, 2013 1:49 pm

If studying for 3 months for the LSAT burns you out, you're going to have a bad time in law school and then as a lawyer.

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Otunga
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Re: You know when you need to take a day off when...

Postby Otunga » Sun Aug 18, 2013 1:53 pm

WanderingPondering wrote:If studying for 3 months for the LSAT burns you out, you're going to have a bad time in law school and then as a lawyer.


I think it's reasonable to want a day off, though. Of course, *wanting* a day off and *needing* a day off are different stories. I've often wanted a day off from studying and have taken it, but I do think it's a rare case that one absolutely needs it due to burnout.

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Erickt26
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Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 9:47 pm

Re: You know when you need to take a day off when...

Postby Erickt26 » Sun Aug 18, 2013 2:01 pm

Otunga wrote:
WanderingPondering wrote:If studying for 3 months for the LSAT burns you out, you're going to have a bad time in law school and then as a lawyer.


I think it's reasonable to want a day off, though. Of course, *wanting* a day off and *needing* a day off are different stories. I've often wanted a day off from studying and have taken it, but I do think it's a rare case that one absolutely needs it due to burnout.


I think it fair to take a day off. I study about 6 hours M-F and Saturday about 3 hours. Total of 33 hours. So taking a sunday off to spend time relaxing seems fair. By the way I have been studying for 8 months. taking two weeks in between every three months.

The way I define burning out is getting to a point where studying will not truly benefit you in any way because you are not focused and you are somewhat feeling overwhelmed by simple problems you know you often get correct without being overwhelmed. To study despite this emotion, is truly a waste of time and valuable questions.

KingofSplitters55
Posts: 139
Joined: Sun May 13, 2012 7:40 pm

Re: You know when you need to take a day off when...

Postby KingofSplitters55 » Sun Aug 18, 2013 10:07 pm

Erickt26 wrote:
Otunga wrote:
WanderingPondering wrote:If studying for 3 months for the LSAT burns you out, you're going to have a bad time in law school and then as a lawyer.


I think it's reasonable to want a day off, though. Of course, *wanting* a day off and *needing* a day off are different stories. I've often wanted a day off from studying and have taken it, but I do think it's a rare case that one absolutely needs it due to burnout.


I think it fair to take a day off. I study about 6 hours M-F and Saturday about 3 hours. Total of 33 hours. So taking a sunday off to spend time relaxing seems fair. By the way I have been studying for 8 months. taking two weeks in between every three months.

The way I define burning out is getting to a point where studying will not truly benefit you in any way because you are not focused and you are somewhat feeling overwhelmed by simple problems you know you often get correct without being overwhelmed. To study despite this emotion, is truly a waste of time and valuable questions.


Exactly. As with any task/project, measured breaks/relaxing is often immensely beneficial to productivity as a whole. Some days you just have to not think about the LSAT and relax/focus on other things - that can more often lead to better LSAT preparation results, assuming other factors are equal, than simply plowing through without a break.




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