did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

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flash21
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did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby flash21 » Tue Jul 09, 2013 11:00 pm

While doing PT's and reviewing them, after you gained understanding on the fundamentals ? Or did you gain most of your points simply from drilling? I know a combination is necessary, but I was wondering where you guys believe a bulk of your points came from.

magickware
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Re: did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby magickware » Tue Jul 09, 2013 11:28 pm

No.

My first try at the LSAT I did nothing but PTs and cursory review. Didn't too hot.

The second time, I did some drilling and more PTs and a bit better review. Didn't do too hot either. Though it being close to 9 points under my PT average, I'm not sure if it was due to poor study methods or just nerves.

For my third, and last time, I did a lot of drilling and not a lot of PTs. Best improvement I've ever seen. Went from averaging between 169-173 to 170-177.

No idea if it's because of all the time I spent studying, or due to change in study methods. I'd argue both, with the change in methods weighing more heavily.

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ScottRiqui
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Re: did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby ScottRiqui » Tue Jul 09, 2013 11:46 pm

Just my opinion, but I think that unless you're battling test anxiety or test fatigue, or constantly running out of time on full sections, I don't think there's much benefit from doing very many full PTs. Yeah, it's nice to be able to do a full, timed PT and get a "score" to track your progress with, but early on at least, you're probably better breaking up PTs into questions by type and drilling them.

ETA - Think back to high school/undergrad - if you were studying for a final, and had a bunch of the professor's old exams, did you sit down and take each one straight through, timed, thinking "ooh, I would have made a 97 on his Spring 2000 exam"? Probably not. You'd probably go through all of them, see what types of questions he asked and how frequently he asked them, and then use them to practice and to focus your studying.

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Otunga
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Re: did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby Otunga » Wed Jul 10, 2013 12:38 am

I think one acquires a vague understanding of the test after reading all the recommended guides (like MLSAT LR, LGB etc.), but then one has to constantly hone whatever they learned and get better by drilling afterward. I've gotten much more confident in LG and LR through drilling by type. When I first started studying for the test roughly 3.5 months ago, the only things I did right were read LGB and drill some of the games 1-20 by type. All other practice was mixed LR practice or RC practice, which in hindsight, was horribly rushed. I mixed this practice in with PTs and was all around the 160s scoring-wise. I said 'fuck this', bought MLSAT LR (LR was undoubtedly my worst section) and RC, and have since acquired a stronger understanding of said sections. Now I'm fairly strong in LR outside of inconsistent performance on L4 questions. I've always been relatively solid in RC (-6 on diagnostic), but now I'm at a safe range of 0 to -4. As for LG, I haven't drilled a section in a while, but I'm averaging between 0 to -5 per Cambridge LG packet (timed), and I tend to do games in bunches (4 at a time, at minimum, but sometimes upwards of 10 or 15 in a row). Basically, what I'm saying is that if my experience with studying is at all representative, hone your method. Drill constantly and worry about PTs later. I think I'm going to get back to PTing within the next couple weeks, and I'll begin with the more recent 60s tests (using DDs advice).

Nicolena.
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Re: did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby Nicolena. » Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:10 pm

When you drill is it strictly one question type or mixed review?

magickware wrote:No.

My first try at the LSAT I did nothing but PTs and cursory review. Didn't too hot.

The second time, I did some drilling and more PTs and a bit better review. Didn't do too hot either. Though it being close to 9 points under my PT average, I'm not sure if it was due to poor study methods or just nerves.

For my third, and last time, I did a lot of drilling and not a lot of PTs. Best improvement I've ever seen. Went from averaging between 169-173 to 170-177.

No idea if it's because of all the time I spent studying, or due to change in study methods. I'd argue both, with the change in methods weighing more heavily.

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Sourrudedude
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Re: did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby Sourrudedude » Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:25 pm

Some people do really well with PT-heavy study plans so it just depends. But obviously if you take a lot of tests and your scores don't get better, you're doing something wrong.

magickware
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Re: did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby magickware » Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:26 pm

Nicolena. wrote:When you drill is it strictly one question type or mixed review?


Question type.

Mixed review is just PTs for me.

kiyoku
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Re: did you see your most improvements while doing PT's?

Postby kiyoku » Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:24 am

If you're trying to identify patterns and familiarize yourself (if you're at this stage) then it's abundantly clear to me that you need to drill by type.
There's a clear difficulty jump when you mix questions. I think it's safe to say that everyone can benefit from having similar questions thrown at them, at least until connections have been made and learning has happened.
That being said, the PT tests mental stamina and your ability to hit home runs even when pitched a curveball, fastball, and then a slider back-to-back.

It seems intuitive to me that you would first learn how to do something. Then do it a lot until you are proficient at it. and then mix it in with the normal testing setting.




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