Time management

User avatar
azditamo
Posts: 86
Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 10:45 pm

Time management

Postby azditamo » Mon Jun 24, 2013 12:19 am

I have been following pityphike's study guide and I'm realizing that's designed for somebody that is studying with no work. How would a person like myself who works 40 hours be able to utilize this guide effectively? In other words from now and to october how should I be using that guide so that I'm on the right section at the right time. Any help will be appreciated, a little background,I have been studying a little bit over a month I finished the lg side of the guide up to advance linear and now I'm working on assumption flaw in the mlsat book. Is that a good start or I'm I behind in regards to that guide. Thank you in advance.

User avatar
TheMostDangerousLG
Posts: 1547
Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:25 am

Re: Time management

Postby TheMostDangerousLG » Mon Jun 24, 2013 12:30 am

azditamo wrote:I have been following pityphike's study guide and I'm realizing that's designed for somebody that is studying with no work. How would a person like myself who works 40 hours be able to utilize this guide effectively? In other words from now and to october how should I be using that guide so that I'm on the right section at the right time. Any help will be appreciated, a little background,I have been studying a little bit over a month I finished the lg side of the guide up to advance linear and now I'm working on assumption flaw in the mlsat book. Is that a good start or I'm I behind in regards to that guide. Thank you in advance.


Well, first of all.. Pithypike's guide isn't the only self-study method. You'll probably need to develop your own method, and be more flexible in how and when you study. Studying doesn't always need to be done in giant chunks; if you're working crazy hours, make sure to schedule a few bits of time here and there to study each week. For example, you could try to study just an hour a day after getting home from work, and/or carry some material with you throughout your day to fit studying into gaps of time where you find yourself free. During your commute (if you ride the subway or bus) or your lunch break are perfect times to grab a few minutes of prep.

I can't say where you need to be at in your prep, as I don't know what score you're shooting for or what materials you have. You'll need to look at where you are in your studying and how much you think you need to do in order to figure out how you should adjust your study schedule (it's important to do this quite often throughout your prep to make sure you're always making progress and using your time effectively).

User avatar
azditamo
Posts: 86
Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 10:45 pm

Re: Time management

Postby azditamo » Mon Jun 24, 2013 12:46 am

TheMostDangerousLG wrote:
azditamo wrote:I have been following pityphike's study guide and I'm realizing that's designed for somebody that is studying with no work. How would a person like myself who works 40 hours be able to utilize this guide effectively? In other words from now and to october how should I be using that guide so that I'm on the right section at the right time. Any help will be appreciated, a little background,I have been studying a little bit over a month I finished the lg side of the guide up to advance linear and now I'm working on assumption flaw in the mlsat book. Is that a good start or I'm I behind in regards to that guide. Thank you in advance.


Well, first of all.. Pithypike's guide isn't the only self-study method. You'll probably need to develop your own method, and be more flexible in how and when you study. Studying doesn't always need to be done in giant chunks; if you're working crazy hours, make sure to schedule a few bits of time here and there to study each week. For example, you could try to study just an hour a day after getting home from work, and/or carry some material with you throughout your day to fit studying into gaps of time where you find yourself free. During your commute (if you ride the subway or bus) or your lunch break are perfect times to grab a few minutes of prep.

I can't say where you need to be at in your prep, as I don't know what score you're shooting for or what materials you have. You'll need to look at where you are in your studying and how much you think you need to do in order to figure out how you should adjust your study schedule (it's important to do this quite often throughout your prep to make sure you're always making progress and using your time effectively).



I am shooting for a 170+ I have the powerscore bibles and the mlsat logical reasoning book. I plan using a pt at this end of the month to gauge where I am. With that I'm shooting. For a 160+ then I will know I am on the right track and if I don't I guess that will help understand where I need to focus.

What other guides would you recomend?

User avatar
TheMostDangerousLG
Posts: 1547
Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:25 am

Re: Time management

Postby TheMostDangerousLG » Mon Jun 24, 2013 1:20 am

azditamo wrote:
TheMostDangerousLG wrote:
azditamo wrote:I have been following pityphike's study guide and I'm realizing that's designed for somebody that is studying with no work. How would a person like myself who works 40 hours be able to utilize this guide effectively? In other words from now and to october how should I be using that guide so that I'm on the right section at the right time. Any help will be appreciated, a little background,I have been studying a little bit over a month I finished the lg side of the guide up to advance linear and now I'm working on assumption flaw in the mlsat book. Is that a good start or I'm I behind in regards to that guide. Thank you in advance.


Well, first of all.. Pithypike's guide isn't the only self-study method. You'll probably need to develop your own method, and be more flexible in how and when you study. Studying doesn't always need to be done in giant chunks; if you're working crazy hours, make sure to schedule a few bits of time here and there to study each week. For example, you could try to study just an hour a day after getting home from work, and/or carry some material with you throughout your day to fit studying into gaps of time where you find yourself free. During your commute (if you ride the subway or bus) or your lunch break are perfect times to grab a few minutes of prep.

I can't say where you need to be at in your prep, as I don't know what score you're shooting for or what materials you have. You'll need to look at where you are in your studying and how much you think you need to do in order to figure out how you should adjust your study schedule (it's important to do this quite often throughout your prep to make sure you're always making progress and using your time effectively).



I am shooting for a 170+ I have the powerscore bibles and the mlsat logical reasoning book. I plan using a pt at this end of the month to gauge where I am. With that I'm shooting. For a 160+ then I will know I am on the right track and if I don't I guess that will help understand where I need to focus.

What other guides would you recomend?


In addition to the PS LR and LG bibles, you should have all three Manhattan guides (RC, LG, and LR). Other useful books are The LSAT Trainer (I'd recommend starting with that book and working through it before you go to the other guides, if you do pick it up), and if you're particularly struggling with LG, the Blueprint LG guide is also quite useful.The Manhattan guides and the two PS bibles are the essentials though.

User avatar
azditamo
Posts: 86
Joined: Mon Jun 03, 2013 10:45 pm

Re: Time management

Postby azditamo » Mon Jun 24, 2013 1:41 am

TheMostDangerousLG wrote:
azditamo wrote:
TheMostDangerousLG wrote:
azditamo wrote:I have been following pityphike's study guide and I'm realizing that's designed for somebody that is studying with no work. How would a person like myself who works 40 hours be able to utilize this guide effectively? In other words from now and to october how should I be using that guide so that I'm on the right section at the right time. Any help will be appreciated, a little background,I have been studying a little bit over a month I finished the lg side of the guide up to advance linear and now I'm working on assumption flaw in the mlsat book. Is that a good start or I'm I behind in regards to that guide. Thank you in advance.


Well, first of all.. Pithypike's guide isn't the only self-study method. You'll probably need to develop your own method, and be more flexible in how and when you study. Studying doesn't always need to be done in giant chunks; if you're working crazy hours, make sure to schedule a few bits of time here and there to study each week. For example, you could try to study just an hour a day after getting home from work, and/or carry some material with you throughout your day to fit studying into gaps of time where you find yourself free. During your commute (if you ride the subway or bus) or your lunch break are perfect times to grab a few minutes of prep.

I can't say where you need to be at in your prep, as I don't know what score you're shooting for or what materials you have. You'll need to look at where you are in your studying and how much you think you need to do in order to figure out how you should adjust your study schedule (it's important to do this quite often throughout your prep to make sure you're always making progress and using your time effectively).



I am shooting for a 170+ I have the powerscore bibles and the mlsat logical reasoning book. I plan using a pt at this end of the month to gauge where I am. With that I'm shooting. For a 160+ then I will know I am on the right track and if I don't I guess that will help understand where I need to focus.

What other guides would you recomend?


In addition to the PS LR and LG bibles, you should have all three Manhattan guides (RC, LG, and LR). Other useful books are The LSAT Trainer (I'd recommend starting with that book and working through it before you go to the other guides, if you do pick it up), and if you're particularly struggling with LG, the Blueprint LG guide is also quite useful.The Manhattan guides and the two PS bibles are the essentials though.


So I tried my best to work though ps lr and found that to be too dry and did not help me understand the concept; however with the mlsat I feel I have a good understanding. I thinly hey do a better job with the lr does that hold true for lg as well? Because ps lg was good in my opinion.

I appreciate you helping me with this. Will the trainer tell me which book to use first and what sections to do and when to use the books by themselves and when to use them cocurrently? Or would you know, what book I should use first to build a solid understanding and what book I should use after I feel like I had done so. That way I don't jump into a book withouth proper knowledge.

Thank you again for the help.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Avs13, cherrygalore, dontsaywhatyoumean, floatie, govlife, Instrumental, lawcapture, Pozzo and 19 guests