My Tutor's Suggestion

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RobertGolddust
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My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby RobertGolddust » Mon Jun 17, 2013 6:30 pm

My tutor, employed by a major test prep company that isn't Kaplan, wants me only to do prep work that he assigns me. For instance, this week he assigned me section 1 of a course book and I can only study the lessons and questions that go along with this section. His reasoning is to hash out bad habits I developed during my self prep, which he claims is my biggest issue: "searching for the wrong things and missing things you shouldn't."

I certainly think my tutor knows what he's doing, but I am inclined to disregard his order and continue drilling logic games if I exhaust all the material from lesson one. Not only am I inclined, but my research done here on TLS tells me the best way to improve is to do as many practice questions as possible. So, I was wondering if anyone has been through something similar? Or just has an opinion on my tutor's suggestion and my probable disobedience.

Reframe
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby Reframe » Mon Jun 17, 2013 6:53 pm

It depends. How bad are your LG habits? You only really want to "drill" the right way to do things, you know?

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RobertGolddust
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby RobertGolddust » Mon Jun 17, 2013 7:49 pm

My LG habits are decent but I did just go -8 on my diagnostic exam and after reviewing it, it was clear that half of my mistakes were careless.

magickware
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby magickware » Mon Jun 17, 2013 8:03 pm

It depends on what his game-plan is, and what yours is.

His game-plan, based off the limited info you gave, is how I would go about teaching the LG to anyone if I was teaching it though. The LG is a series of progressions, and it doesn't make a lot of sense to rush to step 5 when you don't fully understand step 1.

It's like having a kid do multiplication questions when he can't do additions properly. Doesn't make sense.

Reframe
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby Reframe » Mon Jun 17, 2013 8:13 pm

Well, you'll probably improve some on your own, but you might also make it harder to shake bad habits. It really goes to how much you trust the tutor. I've done similar things with students in the past.

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mindarmed
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby mindarmed » Mon Jun 17, 2013 8:19 pm

RobertGolddust wrote:My tutor, employed by a major test prep company that isn't Kaplan, wants me only to do prep work that he assigns me. For instance, this week he assigned me section 1 of a course book and I can only study the lessons and questions that go along with this section. His reasoning is to hash out bad habits I developed during my self prep, which he claims is my biggest issue: "searching for the wrong things and missing things you shouldn't."

I certainly think my tutor knows what he's doing, but I am inclined to disregard his order and continue drilling logic games if I exhaust all the material from lesson one. Not only am I inclined, but my research done here on TLS tells me the best way to improve is to do as many practice questions as possible. So, I was wondering if anyone has been through something similar? Or just has an opinion on my tutor's suggestion and my probable disobedience.


His advice is partially credited, you definitely should master one type of games before proceeding to a new type. However, you should not only work on specifically assigned problems by your tutor. Also, if you're learning LG with some shit company like Princeton Review...I'd stop paying, purchase the Manhattan or Powerscore guide and read those.

Daily_Double
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby Daily_Double » Mon Jun 17, 2013 8:39 pm

RobertGolddust wrote:Not only am I inclined, but my research done here on TLS tells me the best way to improve is to do as many practice questions as possible. So, I was wondering if anyone has been through something similar? Or just has an opinion on my tutor's suggestion and my probable disobedience.


Then you have misread. The best way to improve is to review as thoroughly as possible.

scandk
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby scandk » Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:56 am

Daily_Double wrote:Then you have misread. The best way to improve is to review as thoroughly as possible.


I posted a thread inquiring as to what people do when they review. I'm curious, what constitues a "thorough" review, as opposed to a cursory one? Right now, if I get anything wrong, I read the explanation if available, and try to understand why the other four answers are wrong/why the right answer is right. Is that enough? For LG, reviewing and reading the explanations (at least in the LGB) are very helpful, as I can look at the diagrams, set-ups, inferences I missed/patterns of inferences, etc. For LR, I don't really get much out of reviewing.

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RobertGolddust
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby RobertGolddust » Tue Jun 18, 2013 1:00 am

Thanks for the feedback, your advice was very helpful.

Daily_Double
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby Daily_Double » Tue Jun 18, 2013 1:00 am

scandk wrote:
Daily_Double wrote:Then you have misread. The best way to improve is to review as thoroughly as possible.


I posted a thread inquiring as to what people do when they review. I'm curious, what constitues a "thorough" review, as opposed to a cursory one? Right now, if I get anything wrong, I read the explanation if available, and try to understand why the other four answers are wrong/why the right answer is right. Is that enough? For LG, reviewing and reading the explanations (at least in the LGB) are very helpful, as I can look at the diagrams, set-ups, inferences I missed/patterns of inferences, etc. For LR, I don't really get much out of reviewing.


Rather than retype what I think is an applicable answer to a similar question, check my post here:

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=211345

bp shinners
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby bp shinners » Tue Jun 18, 2013 10:25 am

scandk wrote:
Daily_Double wrote:Then you have misread. The best way to improve is to review as thoroughly as possible.


I posted a thread inquiring as to what people do when they review. I'm curious, what constitues a "thorough" review, as opposed to a cursory one? Right now, if I get anything wrong, I read the explanation if available, and try to understand why the other four answers are wrong/why the right answer is right. Is that enough? For LG, reviewing and reading the explanations (at least in the LGB) are very helpful, as I can look at the diagrams, set-ups, inferences I missed/patterns of inferences, etc. For LR, I don't really get much out of reviewing.


For LG, you also need to evaluate your process of getting to the answer to see if you wasted time or if there was a faster way to get there. This will help you with timing and with spotting inferences in the future.

With LR, you need to figure out how the LSAT tricked you into a wrong answer choice and hid the right one from you. They use the same tricks to get you to pick the same wrong answers, and the same tricks to make the right answers seem wrong. If you can figure out the ones you're falling for, you can stop falling for them.

kiyoku
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby kiyoku » Thu Jun 20, 2013 12:18 am

OP, I have a similar situation so I thought I might give you a reply that I can deeply relate to. I might be wrong, but this really is how I see it.

I was also recently offered a free dedicated class by an individual who scored in the high 170s and had Pro Instructing experience. The classes were held only once a week, and he suggested that everyone sticks to his schedule.

It's very charismatic to say, "Do what I tell you and you'll be fine." But his advice will not guarantee any sort of result for you and for me, I know that I'm better off studying at my own pace.

I've been spending between 8-14 hours, every single day studying, (obviously including Sundays). My objective is not to see me score better on drills. Scoring is only an indicator of knowledge (perhaps the best and most reliable indicator). There are many times when I ace an entire game, but afterwards, my reviews always show that my strategies have inconsistencies, or are sub-optimal at best. What is learning without struggling and what is learning without self-reflection?

Learning is active, not passive. I can't speak for you, but I can speak for myself:

I firmly believe that 1 day a week of classes cannot possibly keep up with the raw amount of time I'm investing multiplied by the way I attack my own thought process. I spend far more time reviewing the games than doing them, and the question that I have in mind is not, "where did I get things wrong?" Rather, I question myself by saying, "Where am I less than optimal?" This deep reflection happens every day. I don't fear my default "bad process" or even worse "bad habits." If I have them, I imagine that there's something wired wrongly in my brain, and I'm happy to have it exposed so early on in my studying process. Once exposed, I immediately spend the whole day and my entire mental/emotional energy on fixing and rewiring everything.

It's always sexy to buy into a charismatic individual who claims that following his lead will result in the best chance for your success. But I never asked for an easy way out.

Unless I'm getting 180 all the time, I'm flawed in some way. Addressing those flaws will always be a deep struggle. But that's what learning is right? Learning can happen at anyone's pace, and the tutor's way is not necessarily the only way. (It sure is a slow way though...)

But just for one second, set aside the tutor and everything else and think about the concept of "drilling" and how powerful (potentially useful and potentially pointless) it is. People talk about reviewing all the time, but I'd bet that most people are still not reviewing nearly as rigorously as they should be. And then out of the people who look back to see how they did, I'm fairly sure that a big chunk of them simply acknowledge what they got wrong instead of fixing and slaughtering the inefficiencies within the frailty of their minds.

If you took 500 basketball shots every day, but you never got to see or hear if the ball went in or not ... would you be able to say that drilling will help you?
And if you got to see the result of your basketball shots, but you never made any adjustments when faced with air-balls, then does it help at all that you get to see the result of your shots in the first place?
And if you do get every shot in with a particularly-practiced-ugly chest-shot, but your process is so inefficient that it's constantly being blocked, is it smart to actually be proud of getting the shots in?

I think those three questions describe what's happening to the middle and lower-side of the curve of student writing the LSAT test. Your instructor knows that it's a waste to use precious materials on people mindlessly practicing without reviewing, adjusting, and deeply reflecting.

So I imagine that he settled for a Lowest Common Denominator and capped you at once a week. He would not have done that if he had deeper respect for your intelligence and will-power and if his incentives were aligned with yours.

I'm no pro and I've only been doing this for a bit less than a month, but I think what I said is what's going to get me my desired score, and I don't think any teacher could have taught me that. Even if a teacher did teach it to me, I would have to do the actual learning.

I say... treat yourself with respect and dignity and hit the f***in books as you see fit. Satisfy the desire to learn, and just never quit!

(I'm not trying to say that I think you don't need anyone's help. I think the books help a lot and a person can definitely help to identify leaks, whereas a book might not. But most of what I said was in reference to the fact that you cannot simply trust your tutor to get you the mark. Rather, you get yourself the mark. Whether or not you have a tutor just doesn't matter so much compared to the more important question. "How do you approach your learning process?")

I hope it helped.
Last edited by kiyoku on Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

Daily_Double
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby Daily_Double » Thu Jun 20, 2013 12:22 am

kiyoku that was awesome.

kiyoku
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby kiyoku » Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:38 am

Daily_Double wrote:kiyoku that was awesome.


Daily, I always especially pay attention to your say in every thread. To have you say this is probably the biggest boost I'll have for the rest of my day! Thanks!

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kwais
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby kwais » Thu Jun 20, 2013 9:01 am

The "you have to forget every other method" thing is a marketing tool. Smart people can try lots of different things and then employ the one that works best for them. Do what he assigns and also study on your own.

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RobertGolddust
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Re: My Tutor's Suggestion

Postby RobertGolddust » Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:23 pm

"So I imagine that he settled for a Lowest Common Denominator and capped you at once a week. He would not have done that if he had deeper respect for your intelligence and will-power and if his incentives were aligned with yours."

Kwais, I'm a little offended by this but that's fine. If you're aiming to be such a high minded individual than you ought to reserve making snap judgements like this.

Anyways... "Do what he assigns and also study on your own." This is good advice and it is ultimately what I have decided to do.




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