Working with different books for LSAT, help

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Mab2013
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Working with different books for LSAT, help

Postby Mab2013 » Fri Jun 14, 2013 1:58 am

Here's a question on using different books together. Should you study, for example LR, based on the questions types and move from book to book or is it better to finish one book ,say the PS LR bible then move to another , the Manhattan for LR? I'm working through the PS now and don't know if I should finish it before opening up the Manhattan.

bp shinners
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Re: Working with different books for LSAT, help

Postby bp shinners » Fri Jun 14, 2013 11:57 am

Mab2013 wrote:Here's a question on using different books together. Should you study, for example LR, based on the questions types and move from book to book or is it better to finish one book ,say the PS LR bible then move to another , the Manhattan for LR? I'm working through the PS now and don't know if I should finish it before opening up the Manhattan.


Work through one book, get enough practice that you're "fluent" in the method, then move to the next book. You want to have a handle on one method before you start picking up another so you don't risk getting terribly confused.

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Pneumonia
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Re: Working with different books for LSAT, help

Postby Pneumonia » Fri Jun 14, 2013 12:50 pm

more methods doesn't necessarily equal more correct answers. for me at least the main purpose of the books was to help me figure out a method that worked reliably for me. this goes for LR/LG/RC. after i came across a method that worked well for me i perused other guides to see if there was anything to glean, and there were a few things, but spent most of my time implementing and improving my own method.

The LSAT Trainer
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Re: Working with different books for LSAT, help

Postby The LSAT Trainer » Fri Jun 14, 2013 1:11 pm

bp shinners wrote:
Mab2013 wrote:Here's a question on using different books together. Should you study, for example LR, based on the questions types and move from book to book or is it better to finish one book ,say the PS LR bible then move to another , the Manhattan for LR? I'm working through the PS now and don't know if I should finish it before opening up the Manhattan.


Work through one book, get enough practice that you're "fluent" in the method, then move to the next book. You want to have a handle on one method before you start picking up another so you don't risk getting terribly confused.


I can definitely see where shinners is coming from, but I just wanted to offer an alternative viewpoint --

One of the hardest things that you face in studying for the LSAT is that it's a one-time experience -- you've never done anything exactly like it before -- one consequence of this is that it's very difficult for you to honestly and accurately gauge your own experience --

Let's say, for example, that you have difficulty with a certain Necessary Assumption question --

It could be that...
You have reading issues that prevent you from seeing the argument clearly...
You have reasoning issues that prevent you from evaluating the argument correctly...
You have a misunderstanding of exactly what the question is asking for...
You have used an ineffective strategy that has you focused on the wrong things...
The question is just an extremely hard question...
You just aren't very good at thinking about what is necessary, etc....
Or most likely some combination of a few of the above --

As a student, especially at the beginning, it's virtually impossible to honestly gauge yourself, because you have few reference points --

Especially if you are the self-learning type, I think one of the advantages of having multiple sources is that they can help you develop a more accurate sense of your issues. Maybe it's a specific strategy that is holding you back, or maybe you are missing some key information about how a question type works -- again, having multiple sources can help you make these determinations, and thus not waste time during your study process.

Again, I'm not totally in disagreement with shinners, and for certain students I would suggest exactly what he does -- I just wanted to offer an alternative perspective --

One other thing I'd like to suggest (and you may already be focused this yourself) is that, as you work on individual q types and such, you always think about how they relate to each other, and to the test as a whole -- essentially, make sure you are consistently aware of both the forest and the trees --

HTH -- good luck -- Mike




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