Feeling hopeless...

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the_pakalypse
Posts: 208
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 3:34 pm

Re: Feeling hopeless...

Postby the_pakalypse » Mon Apr 29, 2013 9:11 pm

Clearlynotstefan wrote:
the_pakalypse wrote:If you're still in the 160ish range, there are so so many opportunities for improvement! I know it seems like a bad thing, but it's actually wonderful because when you get to the 170s, there are such horrible diminishing returns on the time you spend and the rewards you reap.

That's the truth, plateauing is so frustrating.


You may find this excerpt interesting. I use it to motivate myself when my mistakes seem "random". The book is fascinating as well:

"Psychologists used to think that O.K. plateaus marked the upper bounds of innate ability. In his 1869 book “Hereditary Genius,” Sir Francis Galton argued that a person could improve at mental and physical activities until he hit a wall, which “he cannot by any education or exertion overpass.” In other words, the best we can do is simply the best we can do. But Ericsson and his colleagues have found over and over again that with the right kind of effort, that’s rarely the case. They believe that Galton’s wall often has much less to do with our innate limits than with what we consider an acceptable level of performance. They’ve found that top achievers typically follow the same general pattern. They develop strategies for keeping out of the autonomous stage by doing three things: focusing on their technique, staying goal-oriented and getting immediate feedback on their performance. Amateur musicians, for example, tend to spend their practice time playing music, whereas pros tend to work through tedious exercises or focus on difficult parts of pieces. Similarly, the best ice skaters spend more of their practice time trying jumps that they land less often, while lesser skaters work more on jumps they’ve already mastered. In other words, regular practice simply isn’t enough. For all of our griping over our failing memories — the misplaced keys, the forgotten name, the factoid stuck on the tip of the tongue — our biggest failing may be that we forget how rarely we forget.To improve, we have to be constantly pushing ourselves beyond where we think our limits lie and then pay attention to how and why we fail. That’s what I needed to do if I was going to improve my memory."

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011 ... azine&_r=0

homie1515
Posts: 116
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:08 pm

Re: Feeling hopeless...

Postby homie1515 » Mon Apr 29, 2013 9:42 pm

the_pakalypse wrote:
Clearlynotstefan wrote:
the_pakalypse wrote:If you're still in the 160ish range, there are so so many opportunities for improvement! I know it seems like a bad thing, but it's actually wonderful because when you get to the 170s, there are such horrible diminishing returns on the time you spend and the rewards you reap.

That's the truth, plateauing is so frustrating.


You may find this excerpt interesting. I use it to motivate myself when my mistakes seem "random". The book is fascinating as well:

"Psychologists used to think that O.K. plateaus marked the upper bounds of innate ability. In his 1869 book “Hereditary Genius,” Sir Francis Galton argued that a person could improve at mental and physical activities until he hit a wall, which “he cannot by any education or exertion overpass.” In other words, the best we can do is simply the best we can do. But Ericsson and his colleagues have found over and over again that with the right kind of effort, that’s rarely the case. They believe that Galton’s wall often has much less to do with our innate limits than with what we consider an acceptable level of performance. They’ve found that top achievers typically follow the same general pattern. They develop strategies for keeping out of the autonomous stage by doing three things: focusing on their technique, staying goal-oriented and getting immediate feedback on their performance. Amateur musicians, for example, tend to spend their practice time playing music, whereas pros tend to work through tedious exercises or focus on difficult parts of pieces. Similarly, the best ice skaters spend more of their practice time trying jumps that they land less often, while lesser skaters work more on jumps they’ve already mastered. In other words, regular practice simply isn’t enough. For all of our griping over our failing memories — the misplaced keys, the forgotten name, the factoid stuck on the tip of the tongue — our biggest failing may be that we forget how rarely we forget.To improve, we have to be constantly pushing ourselves beyond where we think our limits lie and then pay attention to how and why we fail. That’s what I needed to do if I was going to improve my memory."

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011 ... azine&_r=0



great article. i just read it and it got me pumped up for RC and for LSAT in general. IDK why, i guess im just crazy lol

Chriz
Posts: 279
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 8:33 pm

Re: Feeling hopeless...

Postby Chriz » Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:24 pm

I do both sets of LR from practice tests and then blind review the ones that I am not 100% sure of. I am really inconsistent on LR could go -2 or -10, If I know how to setup a Logic Game properly, or even close to properly, i can run through the questions and be done with time left but sometimes I dont know the setup and I waste more than a minute or even two trying to set it up so just trying to practice. I am not really working on RC at the moment because I know that will just require practice too. I have gone through the LR bible and am like 3/4ths of the way through the LG bible and I am getting in practice before reading the more complicated LG strategies. I have the RC bible too but I am not super worried about RC at the moment. I go through all 4 LGs from a test and then if I didnt get every answer right I watch the 7sage video for it.

User avatar
Br3v
Posts: 4174
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 7:18 pm

Re: Feeling hopeless...

Postby Br3v » Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:28 pm

Think positive and keep prepping, you'll be fine.

User avatar
tehkris
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:13 pm

Re: Feeling hopeless...

Postby tehkris » Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:05 pm

Chriz wrote:Scored a 158 on a PT today ... feeling more hopeless...

Are you practicing in actual time and 5 sections?

Chriz
Posts: 279
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 8:33 pm

Re: Feeling hopeless...

Postby Chriz » Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:20 am

Actual Time yes, I didnt do 5 sections which means my real score could be worse.




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