Isolating Reading Comp Game Styles

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patfeeney
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Isolating Reading Comp Game Styles

Postby patfeeney » Tue Apr 09, 2013 8:33 pm

Following the Princeton Review's breakdown of RC questions, it seems question type I get the most wrong by far are Extract: Inference-style questions (i.e. "It can be inferred from the passage...") They literally make up 5 or 6 of the wrong answers I get on each section I take (I'm currently averaging about -7 or -6 on RC).
Is there any way to isolate particular question styles? I'll keep practicing full sections, but there must be a logical way to practice the questions I get wrong most often in isolation, much like with LR.
Any way? or suggestions?

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Pneumonia
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Re: Isolating Reading Comp Game Styles

Postby Pneumonia » Tue Apr 09, 2013 9:15 pm

1) Perhaps you're finding PR useful; I did not. I did find Manhattan useful, I think it's great.

2) Inference questions have a logical analogue in LR. If you'e missing them there too then sloowwww down and drill them by type. If you're fine with them on LR and not an RC then that hints at a time issue. The quickest way to gain more time on RC is to change the way you're reading the passage.

As with LR, all RC inference questions are justifiable in the text. It just happens to be that in RC the text is bigger, so you're reading style should lend itself to understanding of the structure of the argument/information presented, and also to some sort of indexing procedure so that you can quickly find the relevant premises when asked an inference question. Some test takers can index mentally, others take notes in the margins. If you haven't already checkout Manhattan RC, Voyager RC, and NoodleyOne RC.

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patfeeney
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Re: Isolating Reading Comp Game Styles

Postby patfeeney » Wed Apr 10, 2013 3:52 pm

Pneumonia wrote:1) Perhaps you're finding PR useful; I did not. I did find Manhattan useful, I think it's great.

2) Inference questions have a logical analogue in LR. If you'e missing them there too then sloowwww down and drill them by type. If you're fine with them on LR and not an RC then that hints at a time issue. The quickest way to gain more time on RC is to change the way you're reading the passage.

As with LR, all RC inference questions are justifiable in the text. It just happens to be that in RC the text is bigger, so you're reading style should lend itself to understanding of the structure of the argument/information presented, and also to some sort of indexing procedure so that you can quickly find the relevant premises when asked an inference question. Some test takers can index mentally, others take notes in the margins. If you haven't already checkout Manhattan RC, Voyager RC, and NoodleyOne RC.


I just checked out Noodley One's RC and I'm beginning to read through Manhattan's LR to see if I can combine my skills in LR with RC.

To go along with this, how would I go about drilling individual question types when all I have are full preptests? I could buy the individual Cambridge books, but I've already spent money on the tests...

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Pneumonia
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Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: Isolating Reading Comp Game Styles

Postby Pneumonia » Wed Apr 10, 2013 4:23 pm

patfeeney wrote:I just checked out Noodley One's RC and I'm beginning to read through Manhattan's LR to see if I can combine my skills in LR with RC.

To go along with this, how would I go about drilling individual question types when all I have are full preptests? I could buy the individual Cambridge books, but I've already spent money on the tests...


The Cambridge by type really is useful- it's less than $100 for all of them. If that is too much then I'd consider at least getting the sets that you're having trouble with. I suppose one thing you can do is make copies of the LR from the tests you have (or print more if you have pdf's), cut them out, and manually sort them by type. There are some old forum posts that catalogue them. This can be cost effective if you have access to a printer. If not then 40 tests worth of questions will run you $64 at 10 cents a page (which is cheap where I live) in which case it would probably be better to just get the Cambridge sets.




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