.

User avatar
VegasLaw702
Posts: 92
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:40 am

.

Postby VegasLaw702 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:11 am

.
Last edited by VegasLaw702 on Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:51 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Clearly
Posts: 4165
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 4:09 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby Clearly » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:15 am

If you're talking about LR, over time you'll find time management not to be a problem if you start getting better. The first 10 are usually so straightforward that you can clean them up in 6-7 minutes max. Same with the last few. The 14-18 range is always tricky, but you'll find once you get faster at the easiest questions, you'll have all the time in the world for the hard ones. That said, in the mean time, skip them, mark them clearly, and come back to them at the end. Just don't let yourself spend more time on 20-26 then you need to. Those questions are often just as simple as 1-10

User avatar
VegasLaw702
Posts: 92
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:40 am

.

Postby VegasLaw702 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:23 am

.
Last edited by VegasLaw702 on Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Clearly
Posts: 4165
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 4:09 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby Clearly » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:52 am

The thing is, you can't breakdown the number of questions against the number of minutes universally. High scorers almost always spend 10 minutes+ on the fourth game, they can do that, because they did the first 2 in five minutes each. If I have an LR that's really stumping me, that's okay, I could spend 7 minutes on it if I need to, because I did the first 10 questions in 20 seconds each. Time management isn't about moving quick, it's about having the time to spend when you need to. The way to have no concern about timing is to get very good at doing the easiest questions quickly. Most high scorers could tell you the answers to questions 1-10 without looking at the answer choices, being able to fly though those questions means the rest of the test you're ahead of the clock, and you don't have to worry about skipping. I do skip questions, but rarely over timing concerns, I skip questions if I spent a few minutes on it, and feel like I'm missing something, Or occasionally if I read it 2 times, and still don't feel like I actually read anything, sometimes your brains just not in the right space for a particular question haha.

To answer your question, yes, skip away. Don't look at it as a negative, realize their are easier points to pick up, just develop a system and stick to it. Just as an example, I'll share mine. When I attack a question, I do one of 3 things. If I answer it, and I am confident in my answer, I prephrased it, and I know I don't want to come back to it, I circle it, then put a big check mark next to it and move on. If I have an answer, but I'm not crazy about it, I answer it and don't put a check mark. If I'm lost, or would prefer to come back to it, I put a huge question mark next to it and skip it. When I get to the end, I bubble all the answers I have. I usually have skipped 1, and have a few without checks. I bubble everything I have at this point. I usually have about 10 min left. First I look at the question mark, the skipped space in my answer sheet. I spend as long as I want on this question (or two) till I'm happy with an answer, I circle it, check mark it, and bubble it in. I now usually have 5-7 minutes left, and all of my answers complete and bubbled. With this extra time, I flip through the test and take a look at any questions that don't have a check next to them. I almost never change my answer from what I already selected and bubbled. If I see something new, I answer it, check mark it, and correct the bubble. At any point in this review, they call time, and I'd feel confident with what I bubbled, and I'd have everything in the book. I usually have time to review all of my unchecked answers, and can put my pencil down before they call time, and rest my brain for a minute or two, knowing I've reviewed everything that I thought needed reviewing. As I said above, the freedom to use your time this way comes not from mastery of the hardest questions, but of the easiest ones.
I hope that didn't come off as arrogant or anything, I truly don't intend it to be: you asked for my process and I gave it to you, I put a lot of work in to recognizing patterns and reviewing my work, I suspect if you keep practicing heavily and breaking down answers choices, the patterns will start to emerge, and timing won't even be a problem.

User avatar
VegasLaw702
Posts: 92
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:40 am

.

Postby VegasLaw702 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:06 am

.
Last edited by VegasLaw702 on Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Clearly
Posts: 4165
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 4:09 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby Clearly » Tue Apr 09, 2013 2:21 am

Good luck!

User avatar
Pneumonia
Posts: 1642
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby Pneumonia » Tue Apr 09, 2013 7:00 pm

I agree with Clearly. I don't spend the 1:25 on any question- I spend about 30 seconds on 18 of them and 3:00 minutes on the rest.

goCats3
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 6:02 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby goCats3 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 7:24 pm

Clearlynotstefan wrote:I suspect if you keep practicing heavily and breaking down answers choices, the patterns will start to emerge, and timing won't even be a problem.


Had a similar question to OP and wanted to follow up with something Clearly said.

Couple questions, when you say you recognized patterns, are you referring to patterns in your own test taking (what types of questions you got right/wrong, why you got it wrong, etc.) or patterns in the questions being asked?

Second, I can't tell if you're exaggerating or not on how long you spend on the easy questions in order to make a point, but even if I assume you are, that's still fairly quick on answering the questions. What did you do specifically to practice and how long did it take to get that fast? I ask because right now I'm doing all the LR sections from PT 27-42 individually (started on PT 27 and on PT 30 right now) and it's taking me more than a minute to do each of the first 10 questions. I finish the first 10 somewhere between 12-15 minutes. On average I'm getting -5 or -6 each time with total times between 40-45 minutes.

Edit: I should mention I've already read and worked through the LR Bible.

goCats3
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 6:02 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby goCats3 » Fri Apr 12, 2013 10:33 am

bump.

Any tips on how people typically handle LR questions (is it really possible to go as fast as people above have stated?) and/or how I should study would be helpful, thanks!

Sorry if bumping is against the rules, couldn't find anything saying it wasn't

User avatar
Clearly
Posts: 4165
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 4:09 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby Clearly » Fri Apr 12, 2013 1:07 pm

goCats3 wrote:bump.

Any tips on how people typically handle LR questions (is it really possible to go as fast as people above have stated?) and/or how I should study would be helpful, thanks!

Sorry if bumping is against the rules, couldn't find anything saying it wasn't

Working at the moment, I'll clarify with details in a few hours when I'm home. 30 seconds is certainly possible for 1-10 though, the only trick is practice. After dozens of preptests you'll see that 1-10 rarely have a catch, and are largely predictable. You can usually pre phrase the answer, find it and move on, almost never having to read all the answer choices. Naturally you'll have exceptions, and there's been cases of difficult questions in 1-10. Don't worry, it's just about practicing till you have the confidence to see an answer choice and say "ahh, that's what I'm looking for" circle and move on. You'll gradually get faster just from seeing as many questions as possible and seeing how predictable the easier questions are once they are second nature to you. Keep up the studying, good luck!

goCats3
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 6:02 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby goCats3 » Wed Apr 17, 2013 6:57 pm

Clearlynotstefan wrote:
goCats3 wrote:bump.

Any tips on how people typically handle LR questions (is it really possible to go as fast as people above have stated?) and/or how I should study would be helpful, thanks!

Sorry if bumping is against the rules, couldn't find anything saying it wasn't

Working at the moment, I'll clarify with details in a few hours when I'm home. 30 seconds is certainly possible for 1-10 though, the only trick is practice. After dozens of preptests you'll see that 1-10 rarely have a catch, and are largely predictable. You can usually pre phrase the answer, find it and move on, almost never having to read all the answer choices. Naturally you'll have exceptions, and there's been cases of difficult questions in 1-10. Don't worry, it's just about practicing till you have the confidence to see an answer choice and say "ahh, that's what I'm looking for" circle and move on. You'll gradually get faster just from seeing as many questions as possible and seeing how predictable the easier questions are once they are second nature to you. Keep up the studying, good luck!


I've made it through PT 34 now (so PT 27-34, total of 16 LR sections) and I'm getting about 2-4 wrong per section and averaging 40 minutes (not using a bubble sheet). Will I be naturally getting faster as I go, or is there something else I can do to decrease the number wrong and the time. The timing is what I'm most worried about because in reviewing the ones I got wrong, I realize it's mostly due to reading too quickly as opposed to not understanding. I ordered the Manhattan LSAT books and hoping that will help. Thoughts?

User avatar
NoodleyOne
Posts: 2358
Joined: Fri May 25, 2012 7:32 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby NoodleyOne » Wed Apr 17, 2013 8:59 pm

goCats3 wrote:
Clearlynotstefan wrote:
goCats3 wrote:bump.

Any tips on how people typically handle LR questions (is it really possible to go as fast as people above have stated?) and/or how I should study would be helpful, thanks!

Sorry if bumping is against the rules, couldn't find anything saying it wasn't

Working at the moment, I'll clarify with details in a few hours when I'm home. 30 seconds is certainly possible for 1-10 though, the only trick is practice. After dozens of preptests you'll see that 1-10 rarely have a catch, and are largely predictable. You can usually pre phrase the answer, find it and move on, almost never having to read all the answer choices. Naturally you'll have exceptions, and there's been cases of difficult questions in 1-10. Don't worry, it's just about practicing till you have the confidence to see an answer choice and say "ahh, that's what I'm looking for" circle and move on. You'll gradually get faster just from seeing as many questions as possible and seeing how predictable the easier questions are once they are second nature to you. Keep up the studying, good luck!


I've made it through PT 34 now (so PT 27-34, total of 16 LR sections) and I'm getting about 2-4 wrong per section and averaging 40 minutes (not using a bubble sheet). Will I be naturally getting faster as I go, or is there something else I can do to decrease the number wrong and the time. The timing is what I'm most worried about because in reviewing the ones I got wrong, I realize it's mostly due to reading too quickly as opposed to not understanding. I ordered the Manhattan LSAT books and hoping that will help. Thoughts?

Start using a bubble sheet. Like right now. And if you're doing PTs, stop giving yourself extra time (and counting it). Drilling by type, logging your tests, and going through the MLSAT books are all huge in getting better. I used LSATQA to log where I was missing the most, and then targeted practice of my weakest areas.

goCats3
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 6:02 pm

Re: About skipping questions

Postby goCats3 » Wed Apr 17, 2013 9:23 pm

NoodleyOne wrote:
goCats3 wrote:
Clearlynotstefan wrote:
goCats3 wrote:bump.

Any tips on how people typically handle LR questions (is it really possible to go as fast as people above have stated?) and/or how I should study would be helpful, thanks!

Sorry if bumping is against the rules, couldn't find anything saying it wasn't

Working at the moment, I'll clarify with details in a few hours when I'm home. 30 seconds is certainly possible for 1-10 though, the only trick is practice. After dozens of preptests you'll see that 1-10 rarely have a catch, and are largely predictable. You can usually pre phrase the answer, find it and move on, almost never having to read all the answer choices. Naturally you'll have exceptions, and there's been cases of difficult questions in 1-10. Don't worry, it's just about practicing till you have the confidence to see an answer choice and say "ahh, that's what I'm looking for" circle and move on. You'll gradually get faster just from seeing as many questions as possible and seeing how predictable the easier questions are once they are second nature to you. Keep up the studying, good luck!


I've made it through PT 34 now (so PT 27-34, total of 16 LR sections) and I'm getting about 2-4 wrong per section and averaging 40 minutes (not using a bubble sheet). Will I be naturally getting faster as I go, or is there something else I can do to decrease the number wrong and the time. The timing is what I'm most worried about because in reviewing the ones I got wrong, I realize it's mostly due to reading too quickly as opposed to not understanding. I ordered the Manhattan LSAT books and hoping that will help. Thoughts?

Start using a bubble sheet. Like right now. And if you're doing PTs, stop giving yourself extra time (and counting it). Drilling by type, logging your tests, and going through the MLSAT books are all huge in getting better. I used LSATQA to log where I was missing the most, and then targeted practice of my weakest areas.


Thanks for the tips. I'm not doing full PTs, I'm doing individual LR sections to drill. Not doing full PTs until next month. Right now I'm logging the questions I got wrong in a spreadsheet by type and with notes as to why I got it wrong. I'll check out LSATQA, never heard of it.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: cianchetta0, dontsaywhatyoumean, Evelyn2016 and 6 guests