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Sourrudedude
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Postby Sourrudedude » Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:16 pm

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Last edited by Sourrudedude on Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

magickware
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Re: Reading-heavy majors and RC

Postby magickware » Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:30 pm

In my experience, having a reading intensive major does not particularly help you get terrific score on the RC. It may help you get used to reading a lot of stuff and not get bored, but there is a difference in the pattern of reading required by the RC and the reading you do in school. I got a -3 on my diagnostic, but I noticed that I had a huge level of variance, going from either -0 or upwards of -7 on each RC section.

First, the RC passages are often about stuff that you do not find enjoyable to read. Reading you do in school are almost always things you enjoy reading; it is your major after all. So, your brain may not engage as well.

Second, the method of reading you use may not be suitable for the RC section. I was always a fast reader, and so I just brute-forced reading material by effectively reading it two or three times. The first time I would just blitz through and get a general sense/main point. Second and possibly third time I would read for specific detail for an assignment/paper/what have you. This is not a good strategy for the RC, since doing this for every section will simply make you run out of time.

I'd definitely recommend the Manhattan RC guide; then just take a RC section and see how you do.

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jvincent11
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Re: Reading-heavy majors and RC

Postby jvincent11 » Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:36 pm

I bought the Manhattan LSAT guide. It definitely helps. But after that you need to just do as many as you can. The more you do the faster you will get and the more you will subconsciously know what to look for. After enough preparation you can actually start to predict the questions and you will have a better idea after you read a sentence if that sentence was truly important.

Edit: Manhattan RC guide

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Sourrudedude
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Postby Sourrudedude » Thu Feb 28, 2013 8:06 pm

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Last edited by Sourrudedude on Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Scotusnerd
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Re: Reading-heavy majors and RC

Postby Scotusnerd » Thu Feb 28, 2013 8:39 pm

There is nothing that your major can teach you about reading comprehension that you can't pick up with a few months of studying for the LSAT.

10romeom
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Re: Reading-heavy majors and RC

Postby 10romeom » Thu Feb 28, 2013 10:53 pm

I definitely think it helps a lot, but it isn't enough to get by on. I'm a criminology/law&jurisprudence double major, and I absolutely think reading countless SCt cases helps with RC, but I'm still gonna work my ass off to improve.

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Scotusnerd
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Re: Reading-heavy majors and RC

Postby Scotusnerd » Fri Mar 01, 2013 7:17 am

10romeom wrote:I definitely think it helps a lot, but it isn't enough to get by on. I'm a criminology/law&jurisprudence double major, and I absolutely think reading countless SCt cases helps with RC, but I'm still gonna work my ass off to improve.


How does reading a SCOTUS case help with RC? I don't see the connection. One is a professional work product of some of the top judges in the United States, the other is a series of scholarly journals chosen for complexity with sections mixed up for increased difficulty.

10romeom
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Re: Reading-heavy majors and RC

Postby 10romeom » Fri Mar 01, 2013 8:27 am

Scotusnerd wrote:
10romeom wrote:I definitely think it helps a lot, but it isn't enough to get by on. I'm a criminology/law&jurisprudence double major, and I absolutely think reading countless SCt cases helps with RC, but I'm still gonna work my ass off to improve.


How does reading a SCOTUS case help with RC? I don't see the connection. One is a professional work product of some of the top judges in the United States, the other is a series of scholarly journals chosen for complexity with sections mixed up for increased difficulty.

I'm not saying it's the best thing to study, but it is very dense, occasionally lengthy material, which is not always incredibly interesting. It helps with concentration and discerning the main point of something. Like I said, by no means is it ideal, but I feel it puts me in a better spot than, say, a mathematics major.




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