Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Chowfun
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Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:18 am

I do the examples and understand how to do them but when I get to the practice questions I freeze. It doesn't help that there are so many different types of LR questions. I don't know why my brain can't grasp LR? I feel like such a failure that I can't get questions right. I just want to scream. I can't be the only one that sucks at this stuff. How to effectively practice LR? I don't think anything is clicking yet. Also the word choice used on the test is ridiculous. :(

Throttle
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Throttle » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:44 am

Chowfun wrote:I do the examples and understand how to do them but when I get to the practice questions I freeze. It doesn't help that there are so many different types of LR questions. I don't know why my brain can't grasp LR? I feel like such a failure that I can't get questions right. I just want to scream. I can't be the only one that sucks at this stuff. How to effectively practice LR? I don't think anything is clicking yet. Also the word choice used on the test is ridiculous. :(


DO you have the logic reasoning bible? If not, you need to pick it up. If you do then you need to read a chapter then, immediately drill those types of LR questions, dont try to rush through the whole book in one sitting. the easiest way to drill by LR Qtype is to purchase the Cambridge LR Bundles.

Don't let your frustration of "I'm not earning as quickly as a want to" stop you from slowing down and taking the time you need to do it right. Most of us had to start slowly; dont sweat it.


Also with practice you will get used to the writing style and word choices of LR.

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hume85
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby hume85 » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:47 am

First thing you need to do is relax. Are you taking timed practice tests? If you're just starting out, then don't time yourself. Take as long as you need. You will get faster with time and can take plenty of timed practice tests later.

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:50 am

No. I don't have the LR bible. I have their logic game one and i didn't really like how he explained the material. So I didn't invest in the other bible's. I'm also short on change and won't have it for a while, if I do decide to purchase it. Thank you for your kind words. I just think I am used to understanding stuff rather quickly, and the LSAT has thrown me for a loop. I'm at the point that even when it's time to start drilling for LSAT I get nauseous.

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:53 am

hume85 wrote:First thing you need to do is relax. Are you taking timed practice tests? If you're just starting out, then don't time yourself. Take as long as you need. You will get faster with time and can take plenty of timed practice tests later.


I think in all honest I am going to see a counselor at my school, because I can do everything but relax. I usually have really bad anxiety. You know the kid in class who freaks out if the get anything less than an A++. I think this is also adding to my frustration. This would be my fourth week studying and it has all been on LR. I am also a time cruncher. When I think of how long I spent on a section and see that I still haven't got it. I have an über meltdown.

I'm not taking any practice test. I am just practicing the LR questions in any category. I just got three Must Be True questions in a row wrong. This is only adding to my frustration. :(

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hume85
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby hume85 » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:54 am

Chowfun wrote:No. I don't have the LR bible. I have their logic game one and i didn't really like how he explained the material. So I didn't invest in the other bible's. I'm also short on change and won't have it for a while, if I do decide to purchase it. Thank you for your kind words. I just think I am used to understanding stuff rather quickly, and the LSAT has thrown me for a loop. I'm at the point that even when it's time to start drilling for LSAT I get nauseous.


I was accustomed to understanding stuff quickly as well, and I struggled a little with LR at first. I ended up doing well on the LSAT by any measure. If the test is making you nauseous, then I think you should take a break and get your mind right. Forget about the LSAT for a week or so. You'll be fine. Good luck.

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hume85
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby hume85 » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:56 am

Chowfun wrote:
hume85 wrote:First thing you need to do is relax. Are you taking timed practice tests? If you're just starting out, then don't time yourself. Take as long as you need. You will get faster with time and can take plenty of timed practice tests later.


I think in all honest I am going to see a counselor at my school, because I can do everything but relax. I usually have really bad anxiety. You know the kid in class who freaks out if the get anything less than an A++. I think this is also adding to my frustration. This would be my fourth week studying and it has all been on LR. I am also a time cruncher. When I think of how long I spent on a section and see that I still haven't got it. I have an über meltdown.

I'm not taking any practice test. I am just practicing the LR questions in any category. I just got three Must Be True questions in a row wrong. This is only adding to my frustration. :(


I think seeing a counselor is a great idea. You may have an anxiety disorder. I have one and I take medication for it. The medication and hard, cardiovascular exercise have worked wonders for me.

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:59 am

hume85 wrote:
Chowfun wrote:No. I don't have the LR bible. I have their logic game one and i didn't really like how he explained the material. So I didn't invest in the other bible's. I'm also short on change and won't have it for a while, if I do decide to purchase it. Thank you for your kind words. I just think I am used to understanding stuff rather quickly, and the LSAT has thrown me for a loop. I'm at the point that even when it's time to start drilling for LSAT I get nauseous.


I was accustomed to understanding stuff quickly as well, and I struggled a little with LR at first. I ended up doing well on the LSAT by any measure. If the test is making you nauseous, then I think you should take a break and get your mind right. Forget about the LSAT for a week or so. You'll be fine. Good luck.


This is what a relative of mine said. I just fear if I step away, I will forget what little I have got down and will be worse off than before. Would it be better if I just went to a different section? Maybe tried learning LG and then come back to LR. I think it's impossible for me to put LSAT down for a week and function. I will probably go more nuts from not studying.

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Skill Game
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Skill Game » Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:03 am

you just need to take a step back and realize how important this test is. theyre not going to make it easy for you

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:00 pm

I think I do realize how important is and that it isn't easy. I think that's what is causing me to have the meltdown. I'm putting to much pressure on myself to learn something and learn it fast. I know that I have to take it slow but it just seems more daunting that way.

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seahawk32
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby seahawk32 » Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:01 pm

First, stop whining and bitching -- that won't solve anything. Diagnostics + practice, practice, practice will improve your LR scores.


Diagnostic Stage
1) Take 4 LR sections under timed conditions.
2) Find a list of all LR questions broken down by question type. The list can be found on this forum and on other websites.
3) Create a spreadsheet of LR question types. Check the 4 LR sections that you did and record in the spreadsheet how many questions you answered correctly/incorrectly broken down by question type.

This will give you a rough idea of what question types you need to improve on.


Practice Stage
I improved my LR score by organizing my LSAT study around specific question types.

I would:
1) Read the corresponding question type section in the Logical Reasoning Bible.
2) By using the list mentioned above, find those question types in old tests, and then complete those questions.

When I practiced a question, I would: 1) Do the question timed, giving myself 1:25 (I think the Logical Reasoning Bible says you have approximately 1:25 seconds per LR question. Correct me if I'm wrong) and then 2) BEFORE checking the correct answer, I would do the question untimed, taking as long as I needed to figure out the correct answer. During the untimed portion, I would not move on until I could eliminate every incorrect answer choice and explain why it was incorrect.

This practice style, though tedious had the benefits of acclimating me to completing questions under timed conditions; helping me notice patterns in the LSAT writers' language and question formulations; and, most importantly IMO, by forcing myself to explain why a question choice was wrong, I better understood question types and could effectively approach new questions.


Note: If I couldn't figure out the answer after doing it untimed, I would find an explanation online. The Manhattan LSAT forums are useful in this regard. After reading the explanation, I would do the question again timed and untimed.

Mik Ekim
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Mik Ekim » Mon Feb 11, 2013 2:48 pm

Chowfun wrote:I think I do realize how important is and that it isn't easy. I think that's what is causing me to have the meltdown. I'm putting to much pressure on myself to learn something and learn it fast. I know that I have to take it slow but it just seems more daunting that way.



So what? It IS daunting. Are you saying

a) you are not up for it?
b) you really expect to outscore others without working hard?

Here's how it looks like from the outside: you are trying to master something really difficult (LR) and you haven't sought a lot of wisdom about how to go about it ("didn't find powerscore useful/lacking $" -- give powerscore another chance/look for other materials/sell clothes and skip meals if u need to for the $) and you've tried studying using your own methods for a little bit, and you aren't magically great at LR --

I don't think that warrants a meltdown -- I think that warrants taking a step back, and trying to learn from others. Read through some of the posts for the past study groups, and watch how legions of folks start off at normal scores and work together to end up at exceptional scores -- it's inspiring -- you can see how much satisfaction they get -- you can see how good it feels to work hard and get better.

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:19 pm

Mik Ekim wrote:
Chowfun wrote:I think I do realize how important is and that it isn't easy. I think that's what is causing me to have the meltdown. I'm putting to much pressure on myself to learn something and learn it fast. I know that I have to take it slow but it just seems more daunting that way.



So what? It IS daunting. Are you saying

a) you are not up for it?
b) you really expect to outscore others without working hard?

Here's how it looks like from the outside: you are trying to master something really difficult (LR) and you haven't sought a lot of wisdom about how to go about it ("didn't find powerscore useful/lacking $" -- give powerscore another chance/look for other materials/sell clothes and skip meals if u need to for the $) and you've tried studying using your own methods for a little bit, and you aren't magically great at LR --

I don't think that warrants a meltdown -- I think that warrants taking a step back, and trying to learn from others. Read through some of the posts for the past study groups, and watch how legions of folks start off at normal scores and work together to end up at exceptional scores -- it's inspiring -- you can see how much satisfaction they get -- you can see how good it feels to work hard and get better.


The answer for your first question is none of the above. I know I can do well on this test. I am just prone to stress out (worry/anxiety), therefore I have meltdowns when things don't go the way I expect them to do. I do work hard, I work very hard. I put five hours a day on top of 6 classes, work, EC's, mentoring, and tutoring. I'm not trying to say that I should be rewarded or granted any special attention, but I just want to put it out there that my situation is the exact opposite of, "you really expect to outscore others without working hard." I realize that maybe all of the work I put in may have been in vain. As me not applying proper study methods, and becoming stressed has severely hindered my progress.

I can't sell my clothes because every item of clothing I have is necessary for the harsh northeast winters. Lol skip meals I already do and that is to make the food I have in my kitchen last me another two weeks. I don't get paid for another two weeks. Another reason I am hesitant to purchase powerscore is because I dished out $175 for a prep program and the thought that I need other materials on my budget makes me just want to get into a fetal position.

You are right about it not warranting a meltdown. How I am feeling is totally irrational. I can recognize that. I also recognize that the meltdown isn't going to get me anywhere. Sometimes it is very hard for me to get out of that meltdown, I am a failure rut. I am seeing a counselor who is going to help me control my anxiety and high stress.

Thank you for the Advice and wake up call.

Chowfun
Posts: 117
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:26 pm

seahawk32 wrote:First, stop whining and bitching -- that won't solve anything. Diagnostics + practice, practice, practice will improve your LR scores.


Diagnostic Stage
1) Take 4 LR sections under timed conditions.
2) Find a list of all LR questions broken down by question type. The list can be found on this forum and on other websites.
3) Create a spreadsheet of LR question types. Check the 4 LR sections that you did and record in the spreadsheet how many questions you answered correctly/incorrectly broken down by question type.

This will give you a rough idea of what question types you need to improve on.


Practice Stage
I improved my LR score by organizing my LSAT study around specific question types.

I would:
1) Read the corresponding question type section in the Logical Reasoning Bible.
2) By using the list mentioned above, find those question types in old tests, and then complete those questions.

When I practiced a question, I would: 1) Do the question timed, giving myself 1:25 (I think the Logical Reasoning Bible says you have approximately 1:25 seconds per LR question. Correct me if I'm wrong) and then 2) BEFORE checking the correct answer, I would do the question untimed, taking as long as I needed to figure out the correct answer. During the untimed portion, I would not move on until I could eliminate every incorrect answer choice and explain why it was incorrect.

This practice style, though tedious had the benefits of acclimating me to completing questions under timed conditions; helping me notice patterns in the LSAT writers' language and question formulations; and, most importantly IMO, by forcing myself to explain why a question choice was wrong, I better understood question types and could effectively approach new questions.


Note: If I couldn't figure out the answer after doing it untimed, I would find an explanation online. The Manhattan LSAT forums are useful in this regard. After reading the explanation, I would do the question again timed and untimed.


Thank you!

totoro
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby totoro » Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:29 pm

You need to know you are not a failure for not getting it right away. LR requires very specific skills and the skill set is very narrow. Therefore you could be a really smart person but just not used to the way that LR works. Don't despair - I did the entire Cambridge LR set for PTs 1-38 and took most of the PT's through 68 before I improved slightly on LR. You will see small improvements rather than large jumps, most probably, but they will still mean a lot if they are consistent. Make sure you have your anxiety under control too, even if it requires medication, because everyone fails many times in life, and you have to be able to deal with potential failure.

Make sure you invest in Manhattan LR guide and PS LR bible. You can buy them used for cheap. Also, if you are so low on money, are you sure law school is the right path? Law school involves a lot of loans... sounds like you might want to work for a few years to save up first.

Edit: I forgot to mention, make sure you know how to approach each type of LR question. I know there are a lot of different types, but it is essential to take a different strategy depending on the question, because they are asking for different things. At first I was approaching them all intuitively and without strategy, which is why I was not improving.

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 5:01 pm

totoro wrote:You need to know you are not a failure for not getting it right away. LR requires very specific skills and the skill set is very narrow. Therefore you could be a really smart person but just not used to the way that LR works. Don't despair - I did the entire Cambridge LR set for PTs 1-38 and took most of the PT's through 68 before I improved slightly on LR. You will see small improvements rather than large jumps, most probably, but they will still mean a lot if they are consistent. Make sure you have your anxiety under control too, even if it requires medication, because everyone fails many times in life, and you have to be able to deal with potential failure.

Make sure you invest in Manhattan LR guide and PS LR bible. You can buy them used for cheap. Also, if you are so low on money, are you sure law school is the right path? Law school involves a lot of loans... sounds like you might want to work for a few years to save up first.

Edit: I forgot to mention, make sure you know how to approach each type of LR question. I know there are a lot of different types, but it is essential to take a different strategy depending on the question, because they are asking for different things. At first I was approaching them all intuitively and without strategy, which is why I was not improving.


Thank you for the encouraging words. I was hoping if I could get scholarships and loans I'd be okay. I did hear most of the scholarships are awarded to people who score high on the LSAT. This is another reason why I need to do well. I will be attending a law school close to home, which will take a big chunk off my bill.

Mik Ekim
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Mik Ekim » Mon Feb 11, 2013 7:39 pm

Chowfun wrote:
Mik Ekim wrote:
Chowfun wrote:I think I do realize how important is and that it isn't easy. I think that's what is causing me to have the meltdown. I'm putting to much pressure on myself to learn something and learn it fast. I know that I have to take it slow but it just seems more daunting that way.



So what? It IS daunting. Are you saying

a) you are not up for it?
b) you really expect to outscore others without working hard?

Here's how it looks like from the outside: you are trying to master something really difficult (LR) and you haven't sought a lot of wisdom about how to go about it ("didn't find powerscore useful/lacking $" -- give powerscore another chance/look for other materials/sell clothes and skip meals if u need to for the $) and you've tried studying using your own methods for a little bit, and you aren't magically great at LR --

I don't think that warrants a meltdown -- I think that warrants taking a step back, and trying to learn from others. Read through some of the posts for the past study groups, and watch how legions of folks start off at normal scores and work together to end up at exceptional scores -- it's inspiring -- you can see how much satisfaction they get -- you can see how good it feels to work hard and get better.


The answer for your first question is none of the above. I know I can do well on this test. I am just prone to stress out (worry/anxiety), therefore I have meltdowns when things don't go the way I expect them to do. I do work hard, I work very hard. I put five hours a day on top of 6 classes, work, EC's, mentoring, and tutoring. I'm not trying to say that I should be rewarded or granted any special attention, but I just want to put it out there that my situation is the exact opposite of, "you really expect to outscore others without working hard." I realize that maybe all of the work I put in may have been in vain. As me not applying proper study methods, and becoming stressed has severely hindered my progress.

I can't sell my clothes because every item of clothing I have is necessary for the harsh northeast winters. Lol skip meals I already do and that is to make the food I have in my kitchen last me another two weeks. I don't get paid for another two weeks. Another reason I am hesitant to purchase powerscore is because I dished out $175 for a prep program and the thought that I need other materials on my budget makes me just want to get into a fetal position.

You are right about it not warranting a meltdown. How I am feeling is totally irrational. I can recognize that. I also recognize that the meltdown isn't going to get me anywhere. Sometimes it is very hard for me to get out of that meltdown, I am a failure rut. I am seeing a counselor who is going to help me control my anxiety and high stress.

Thank you for the Advice and wake up call.


glad to see the response, and glad to see I got a rise out of you! Good luck with the studies.

Chowfun
Posts: 117
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:06 pm

Mik Ekim wrote:
Chowfun wrote:
Mik Ekim wrote:
Chowfun wrote:I think I do realize how important is and that it isn't easy. I think that's what is causing me to have the meltdown. I'm putting to much pressure on myself to learn something and learn it fast. I know that I have to take it slow but it just seems more daunting that way.



So what? It IS daunting. Are you saying

a) you are not up for it?
b) you really expect to outscore others without working hard?

Here's how it looks like from the outside: you are trying to master something really difficult (LR) and you haven't sought a lot of wisdom about how to go about it ("didn't find powerscore useful/lacking $" -- give powerscore another chance/look for other materials/sell clothes and skip meals if u need to for the $) and you've tried studying using your own methods for a little bit, and you aren't magically great at LR --

I don't think that warrants a meltdown -- I think that warrants taking a step back, and trying to learn from others. Read through some of the posts for the past study groups, and watch how legions of folks start off at normal scores and work together to end up at exceptional scores -- it's inspiring -- you can see how much satisfaction they get -- you can see how good it feels to work hard and get better.


The answer for your first question is none of the above. I know I can do well on this test. I am just prone to stress out (worry/anxiety), therefore I have meltdowns when things don't go the way I expect them to do. I do work hard, I work very hard. I put five hours a day on top of 6 classes, work, EC's, mentoring, and tutoring. I'm not trying to say that I should be rewarded or granted any special attention, but I just want to put it out there that my situation is the exact opposite of, "you really expect to outscore others without working hard." I realize that maybe all of the work I put in may have been in vain. As me not applying proper study methods, and becoming stressed has severely hindered my progress.

I can't sell my clothes because every item of clothing I have is necessary for the harsh northeast winters. Lol skip meals I already do and that is to make the food I have in my kitchen last me another two weeks. I don't get paid for another two weeks. Another reason I am hesitant to purchase powerscore is because I dished out $175 for a prep program and the thought that I need other materials on my budget makes me just want to get into a fetal position.

You are right about it not warranting a meltdown. How I am feeling is totally irrational. I can recognize that. I also recognize that the meltdown isn't going to get me anywhere. Sometimes it is very hard for me to get out of that meltdown, I am a failure rut. I am seeing a counselor who is going to help me control my anxiety and high stress.

Thank you for the Advice and wake up call.


glad to see the response, and glad to see I got a rise out of you! Good luck with the studies.


Yea I'm finding out my nerves are causing me to misread the questions and have to read it over and over again. This is what leads to me getting the question incorrect, because when I don't feel stressed or nervous I most likely get the answer correct. I need to work on this pronto.

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crestor
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby crestor » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:36 pm

you should really look at the lsat not as a daunting but something you are lucky to engage in..

by this, i mean that the lsat is an even playing field for everyone in the sense of comparability for LSAC administrators. it doesn't matter if you went to harvard, yale, or montana state. if you went to a mid-lower school and you have a high gpa with an easy major or even a low one with a hard major, you scoring high on the LSAT shows that you have the potential to POSSIBLY succeed at law school.

at the same time, people at elite schools with difficult majors may not have the gpa but can validate their collegiate career for law school ad coms by killing the LSAT.

a test that either validates or invalidates your potential career as a lawyer is something you should look foward to with the opportunity that you can really change your whole life by doing well on this test. take it slow

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crestor
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby crestor » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:39 pm

also, if you aren't going to be able to put down $500 or so for essential prep course materials, are you really going to be WILLING to take out $150,000 loans with interest rates that can and will bankrupt you for a long time assuming meaningful legal-related employment is unattainable?

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:47 pm

crestor wrote:also, if you aren't going to be able to put down $500 or so for essential prep course materials, are you really going to be WILLING to take out $150,000 loans with interest rates that can and will bankrupt you for a long time assuming meaningful legal-related employment is unattainable?


Thank you for the advice. Now to answer your question. There is a difference between willing and able. It isn't a matter of willing, because I am all for it. It is a question of able. If I am able to take out the loans necessary and receive scholarships I will be all for it. If I am not I will have to find other means.

I am willing to toss out $500 for LSAT prep if it is necessary and if I was able. Therefore it is not a question of willing. My desire to be a lawyer never falters, but sometimes being able isn't always in my control.

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crestor
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby crestor » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:48 pm

finally, many of my dad's friends are attorneys. one of them was a very prominent one. i was lucky enough to sit down with him once and asked him if he found the LSAT stressful because it made or broke your lsac admission. this was a while back before i even touched LSAT material... he simply laughed and said essentially that although stress for the lsat is expected and all, the lsat is just the beginning in terms of stress.. dealing with people's money and their livelihoods day in and out is infinitely more stressful then some standardized test"

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crestor
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby crestor » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:51 pm

Chowfun wrote:
crestor wrote:also, if you aren't going to be able to put down $500 or so for essential prep course materials, are you really going to be WILLING to take out $150,000 loans with interest rates that can and will bankrupt you for a long time assuming meaningful legal-related employment is unattainable?


Thank you for the advice. Now to answer your question. There is a difference between willing and able. It isn't a matter of willing, because I am all for it. It is a question of able. If I am able to take out the loans necessary and receive scholarships I will be all for it. If I am not I will have to find other means.

I am willing to toss out $500 for LSAT prep if it is necessary and if I was able. Therefore it is not a question of willing. My desire to be a lawyer never falters, but sometimes being able isn't always in my control.



seeing your current load, i assume you are not a college graduate. if anything, wait until you can devote your time/resources/attention to this test. this test decides where you go to law school. if your parents are unwilling to let you first graduate and take time off (a year or so for the lsat) and instead want you to go undergrad summer then law school, tell them the average age of a 1L is 25.

if this does not convince them which it probably will not, show them http://insidethelawschoolscam.blogspot.com/ a blog by a law professor at Uni of Colorado.. this will echo why you must get into a T1 (1-50) school and if you are unable to do this by not taking time of to do the LSAT, you will be wasting their money and put yourself into financial hell

Chowfun
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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby Chowfun » Tue Feb 12, 2013 7:21 am

@ Crestor what if I push my test back to October? It will give me a lot more time to improve and it probably will remove a lot of my stress and make studying more enjoyable. Also if I don't like my October score I can retake in December.

Yes I believe this is the best decision, because it makes more sense. I won't be pressured to get all A's in my 6 classes and take one of the most important exams of my life so close together. It doesn't make sense to get a LSAT score of 170+ and my gap drops from a 3.7 to a 3.5. Granted many have said LSAT matters the most, but I have put a lot of pride in my gpa and it is a reflection of my four years in university. I want to make sure it reflects only the best part of me. I am also hoping to raise it another .1 before I graduate anyway.

This way I can continue my rigorous study method, and adapt new strategies without feeling overwhelmed or that I am not meeting my deadlines fast enough. This also means I can invest more in prep materials, and feel more relaxed.

Also the OCT. test date gives me an additional three months of no additional intellectual burdens. I can study, write personal statements, get letters of rec, and study.

Then even with 7 months of loyal devotion and prep. I do not make my goal. I can opt for the December test, which will not be a problem considering my fall Senior schedule will be filled with a more relaxed course load: general education, PC classes, and stuff.

This makes a lot of sense to me. Lol

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Re: Having a meltdown. How to approach practicing LR?

Postby crestor » Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:08 am

Chowfun wrote:@ Crestor what if I push my test back to October? It will give me a lot more time to improve and it probably will remove a lot of my stress and make studying more enjoyable. Also if I don't like my October score I can retake in December.

Yes I believe this is the best decision, because it makes more sense. I won't be pressured to get all A's in my 6 classes and take one of the most important exams of my life so close together. It doesn't make sense to get a LSAT score of 170+ and my gap drops from a 3.7 to a 3.5. Granted many have said LSAT matters the most, but I have put a lot of pride in my gpa and it is a reflection of my four years in university. I want to make sure it reflects only the best part of me. I am also hoping to raise it another .1 before I graduate anyway.

This way I can continue my rigorous study method, and adapt new strategies without feeling overwhelmed or that I am not meeting my deadlines fast enough. This also means I can invest more in prep materials, and feel more relaxed.

Also the OCT. test date gives me an additional three months of no additional intellectual burdens. I can study, write personal statements, get letters of rec, and study.

Then even with 7 months of loyal devotion and prep. I do not make my goal. I can opt for the December test, which will not be a problem considering my fall Senior schedule will be filled with a more relaxed course load: general education, PC classes, and stuff.

This makes a lot of sense to me. Lol


sounds like you already know what to do man. don't need some random guy on the net to reinforce what seems to be concrete in reasoning in ur mind




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