Advice please!

lifeprincess13
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:33 pm

Advice please!

Postby lifeprincess13 » Thu Jan 31, 2013 6:59 pm

So, thanks in advance to whoever can help me out.

Ok, so, I am getting one question wrong in like half the types. So, for my last test, I got:

Role: 1
Flaw: 1
Assumption: 1
Inference: 2
Main Point: 1
Point at Issue: 1
Paradox: 1
Pattern: 1

I mean, this is freaking ridiculous! How am I supposed to improve if I am getting answers wrong all over the place?! Does anyone have any advice for improving overall? I am trying to get like 2-4 wrong in each LR section. I know I am capable. I will take absolutely any advice.
Last edited by lifeprincess13 on Thu Jan 31, 2013 11:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Sourrudedude
Posts: 415
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2013 1:34 pm

Re: LR Help

Postby Sourrudedude » Thu Jan 31, 2013 7:35 pm

It might help if people knew what you were doing to study already. My only advice would be to focus on some of the more general concepts like identifying the conclusion in an argument and knowing the difference between sufficient and necessary conditions.

lifeprincess13
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:33 pm

Re: LR Help

Postby lifeprincess13 » Thu Jan 31, 2013 8:13 pm

Well, its my second time taking the LSAT, it will be next Saturday at least. I have been through all 3 Bibles like 5-7 times. I had bought the Kaplan books at a garage sale a couple summers ago for like $4, so went through those. One book explains the concepts briefly, like a synopsis of the three Bibles. The next categorizes the types of questions by their difficulty, from level 1 to level 4. I have been through those. Then the next book allows you to set up your pacing, for the sections and the last book forces you to endure through 6 sections. I have never had a problem sitting through all 6 sections, so I am not focused on that or the time pressure as much, but mostly getting questions right. I have been through the SuperPrep book as well, taken all three tests. Last time I took the LSAT, I scored poorly because, I THINK, I had a really inconsistent week beforehand, as I couldn't sleep. However, when I was studying for it, I got many of the Must Be True, Inference, and Assumption questions wrong. As mentioned before, I am now all over the place and do not know why.

I hope I cleared up any questions. If not, please let me know!

Thanks!

magickware
Posts: 359
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2012 1:27 pm

Re: Advice please!

Postby magickware » Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:39 am

How many PTs have you taken and what you do normally get on them?

lifeprincess13
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:33 pm

Re: Advice please!

Postby lifeprincess13 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:48 am

I have taken all of them, scoring anywhere from 158 - 171, but most often scoring in the mid-160s. When I took my first LSAT though, I got a 155, very, very sadly.

User avatar
bizzybone1313
Posts: 996
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2012 4:31 pm

Re: Advice please!

Postby bizzybone1313 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:52 am

It sounds like you aren't taking the time to underatand why each answer choice is right and wrong, which would explain your wide score range. Going thru each answer choice--- both right and wrong--- really blows, but it is a very important for you to be able to improve.

magickware
Posts: 359
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2012 1:27 pm

Re: Advice please!

Postby magickware » Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:54 am

lifeprincess13 wrote:I have taken all of them, scoring anywhere from 158 - 171, but most often scoring in the mid-160s. When I took my first LSAT though, I got a 155, very, very sadly.


That's... strange.

There should at least have been a consistent upwards movement, just from getting used to the form of the test and the types.

So, ya, you must have not bothered to review. That's really bad. Review your tests. Find out exactly why something is right/wrong.

User avatar
wtrc
Posts: 2057
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 9:37 pm

Re: Advice please!

Postby wtrc » Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:15 am

lifeprincess13 wrote:I have taken all of them, scoring anywhere from 158 - 171, but most often scoring in the mid-160s. When I took my first LSAT though, I got a 155, very, very sadly.


How do you review each PT? Is it just a cursory glance of everything you got wrong, or an in depth study of it?

One thing I used to do wrong was I wouldn't take the time to review each PT. I'd see it as more of a "cool let's see how I did" rather than "hmm, where am I struggling" sort of thing.

Some posters have suggested taking every answer you get wrong, and problems that you got right but were really unsure and just got lucky, and physically writing (or typing) out why 4 of the answers are incorrect, why the correct answer is correct, and why your thought process led you to believe another was correct. It sounds like this will help, I'm going to start doing it in my June studying.

griffin.811
Posts: 217
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:30 am

Re: Advice please!

Postby griffin.811 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 10:38 am

Improvement will be tough with just a week away, and getting -9 or so on 2 sections makes the possibility of anything over 160 very bleak. That said,I agree with Weathercoins. When reviewing LR, I find myself in a constant struggle between wanting to make sure I drill with time constraints, and wanting to focus on accuracy. You NEED to be writing out why each incorrect answer choice was wrong and why the correct choice was right. NON NEGOTIABLE! This needs to be done for every problem you got wrong. I even take it a step further and take the time to write out what it was about the question (or answer choices) that tricked me, and what I can do to better recognize this issue so it doesnt affect me next time.

I've found that many on TLS are STRONG advocates of drilling, and rightfully so. However after a certain point, I think that emphasis should really be placed on reviewing questions you got wrong, specifically WHY you got them wrong, multiple times. If you cant sit down and write out what about this question tricked you, then you need to take the time to figure out, however long it may take. Otherwise your drilling was pointless. That issue WILL pop up again, and you will be just as unprepared the second time around.

My advice, go through the section you got wrong, untimed. rather than focusing on getting the right answer, focus on finding the gap in the P/C relationship. The more you do this, the faster you will become at recognizing the issues and eventually time shouldn't be an issue. I think this is EXTREMELY helpful in your case since you have already gone through all the tests and while you will probably remember the answers to many of the questions, you probably will not remember the issues in the P/C relationships.

Only after you find the issue in the passage should you try to match the issue with the answer choices.

lifeprincess13
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:33 pm

Re: Advice please!

Postby lifeprincess13 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:07 am

So, how do I even do that? I mean, when I check my answers, it was either between two choices and I picked the other one or after reading the answer choice, I go, OHHH that makes sense. I mean, sometimes, I do not get it, like one question a test, but usually, as soon as I realize the answer choice, I get why its right.

griffin.811
Posts: 217
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:30 am

Re: Advice please!

Postby griffin.811 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:58 am

So for questions where you clearly had it down to 2 answers, maybe you can skip writing out why each of the other answers was wrong and just focus on why the one you selected was wrong. The issue still remains however that something in the incorrect answer tricked you into thinking it was correct, and something in the correct answer failed to trigger a response from you that it was right. IMO this is what you need to focus on, re tooling your thought process to avoid these trip ups. Keep this in mind, there are very rarely going to be truely "stupid" mistakes. The test is written in such a way that we fall for these little tricks. It wasnt an accident, the writers wanted us to fall for that little trick. Naturally some mistakes will be easier to reconcile than others and these are the ones we brush of a "stupid" mistakes on our part, when in reality these were well thought out traps placed by the writers. Don't fall into this trap, stay consistent. Figure out why that stupid mistake was made! It really is a must. I think you'll see what I mean when you go to write out what tricked you and the words to describe it aren't readily available, but stick with it. Here is one I did, maybe this will help:

257 (flaw cambridge packet)

1. why the correct answer is correct: "if" means sufficient. So this means that 1/2 of the ppl believe "if indicted" > "resign", so in other wds an "indictment" is sufficient for "resignation"

The issue is that the author compares a statement about "IF something occurs" to a statement about "ONLY IF that same thing occurs". If is a cufficient condidtion where Only if indicates a sufficient relationship. statement about sufficiency cannot be compared to statement of necessity in this manner. B addresses this.

2. Why D isnt the correct answer - D does not represent a flaw. It is perfectly acceptable to draw a conclusion from two different queries. In many cases, it may even lead to a stronger conclusion.

3. What tricked me into selecting D - The language used in D followed chronologically with the passage. The author does draw a conlusion from 2 queries as D states, it is not a flaw to do this.

4. How to avoid this mistake in the future - Actively look for comparisons between "if" and "only if" statements. (when v. only when etc...). Will also make sure not to select an answer ONLY because it follows chronologically with the passage. While a correct answer may do this, it must also represent an answer to the question being asked: a flaw, assumption, equivocation, etc..

Then review your notes every so often, with the question in front of you.

bp shinners
Posts: 3091
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:05 pm

Re: Advice please!

Postby bp shinners » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:04 pm

lifeprincess13 wrote:So, how do I even do that? I mean, when I check my answers, it was either between two choices and I picked the other one or after reading the answer choice, I go, OHHH that makes sense. I mean, sometimes, I do not get it, like one question a test, but usually, as soon as I realize the answer choice, I get why its right.


Understanding why your answer was wrong and the right answer was right is only half the battle. You should always answer these four questions:
1) Why is the right answer right? For you, check

2) Why is the wrong answer wrong? Check, again

3) What about the wrong answer made me think it was right? This one's very important - it will let you know what tricks you're falling for on the LSAT. So you might be getting one of each question type wrong, but I guarantee you there's a pattern to the incorrect answers you're picking. Maybe the test easily talks you into an equivocation. Maybe you pick answers that use strong language because they seem more certain. Whatever it is, you'll eventually see 2-3 patterns emerge; when you do that, you can stop falling for the same tricks.

4) What about the right answer made me think it was wrong? If you picked a wrong answer, then you threw out the right one. How did they get you to do that? What did they include in the answer that you thought was flawed? Again, if you note a pattern here, you can tell when they're using that trick to mask a correct answer.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests