LSAT analogy

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tkim129
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LSAT analogy

Postby tkim129 » Wed Jan 30, 2013 1:30 am

The LSAT is like training for a triathlon.

In the triathlon (LSAT), each event (section) requires general athleticism (intelligence), but also particularized skills for each event: biking, racing, and swimming (Games, LR, and RC).

Some are good at biking (RC), while others may excel at swimming (LR).

However, everyone should be good at running (Games). Because after putting in hundreds hours of training, you should be able to run (Games) in your sleep.

While your natural athleticism (intelligence) determines your highest potential, hard work is what gets you there.

Also, it doesn't matter how great of a runner, biker, or a swimmer you are in training (Preptests). You got to kick ass on the day of the race (test day).

----

On my diagnostic, I scored a 148. Yet, I got a 172 by treating the LSAT like an athletic event. Put the hours in and the results will show.

Hope this helps!

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bizzybone1313
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Re: LSAT analogy

Postby bizzybone1313 » Wed Jan 30, 2013 1:40 am

So how much total time did you put in for the 172?

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BlaqBella
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Re: LSAT analogy

Postby BlaqBella » Wed Jan 30, 2013 11:48 am

Thank you for that analogy and congratulations on your amazing 24 point jump!

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tkim129
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Re: LSAT analogy

Postby tkim129 » Thu Jan 31, 2013 1:42 am

bizzybone1313 wrote:So how much total time did you put in for the 172?


I would say you need at least 25 timed PTs under your belt (I did around 35). That is roughly 4 hours each (counting test, break, and post test review). That alone is roughly 100 hours.

Then, I say you need around 50 hours doing LSAT related research to learn best practices of other successful test takers and etc.****

Next and most importantly, you need to spend around 25 hours crafting your LSAT strategy and logging your performance. Keep some form of diary or if you prefer, an excel spread sheet that contains your LSAT schedule, notes, and all the numbers associated with your performance.****

Lastly, you need roughly around 50 hours drilling. Basically doing all the crap they would give you at an LSAT class, which fortunately I got for free from a friend.

Total time: 225 hours

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**** Spending hours here is what makes the difference in my opinion. Everyone works hard, but not everyone works smart too. Not sure if this makes sense, but work hard at working smart. Mindlessly drilling and taking PTs is not a smart use of your time. Instead, spend a large number of hours learning more about the test and yourself as a test taker.

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tkim129
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Re: LSAT analogy

Postby tkim129 » Thu Jan 31, 2013 1:44 am

BlaqBella wrote:Thank you for that analogy and congratulations on your amazing 24 point jump!



Your welcome and thanks!

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BlaqBella
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Re: LSAT analogy

Postby BlaqBella » Thu Jan 31, 2013 10:18 am

tkim129 wrote:**** Spending hours here is what makes the difference in my opinion. Everyone works hard, but not everyone works smart too. Not sure if this makes sense, but work hard at working smart. Mindlessly drilling and taking PTs is not a smart use of your time. Instead, spend a large number of hours learning more about the test and yourself as a test taker.


By this do you mean more review (understanding why an answer is right/why you incorrectly chose an answer choice) ?

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tkim129
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Re: LSAT analogy

Postby tkim129 » Wed Feb 06, 2013 6:23 pm

BlaqBella wrote:
tkim129 wrote: By this do you mean more review (understanding why an answer is right/why you incorrectly chose an answer choice) ?


No, and sorry for the slow response. It really means to finding out how others succeeded to avoid reinventing the wheel. Knowledge is power. And on the internet, it's free. So there's no real excuse for not being informed on what is the best way to prepare for this test.

Hope that helps!

-TK

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Jeffort
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Re: LSAT analogy

Postby Jeffort » Wed Feb 06, 2013 9:13 pm

BlaqBella wrote:
tkim129 wrote:**** Spending hours here is what makes the difference in my opinion. Everyone works hard, but not everyone works smart too. Not sure if this makes sense, but work hard at working smart. Mindlessly drilling and taking PTs is not a smart use of your time. Instead, spend a large number of hours learning more about the test and yourself as a test taker.


By this do you mean more review (understanding why an answer is right/why you incorrectly chose an answer choice) ?


Bolded part above^ is very important to fine tune your understanding and skills in order to maximize your potential score and is as, if not even more important than numerically tracking your progress and compiling a list of various random tips from others so that you spot when you failed to apply useful tips and techniques on practice questions and will consequently be more conscientious about not forgetting to apply them later when you work more questions.

Doing both hand in hand goes a long way to ingrain good techniques and practices into your approach so that they become habits you don't have to think about/remember/remind yourself about come test day since by then they should be solidified in your mind and approach and come out automatically like second nature.




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