No mistakes except the CONVERSE, BluePrint Lesson 1

jared6180
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:47 pm

No mistakes except the CONVERSE, BluePrint Lesson 1

Postby jared6180 » Fri Jan 25, 2013 5:48 pm

I am doing drills in my BluePrint lesson 1 homework and I am finding that out of 20 drills I only miss 3 questions, however they are all the converse fallacy. Any particular advise on how to fix this now before I move to lesson two?

FYI: doing the movie, not a local course as the closest course is around 400 miles away.

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pena2200
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Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2012 1:15 pm

Re: No mistakes except the CONVERSE, BluePrint Lesson 1

Postby pena2200 » Fri Jan 25, 2013 7:42 pm

I'm also taking the online BP course. Most of my mistakes are coming from diagramming, and the questions I get wrong I usually pick the converse of. I'd email the study buddy or post on BP Shinners weekly office hours here.

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=185758&start=450

Good luck! Hopefully we both progress well!

westtech
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Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:29 pm

Re: No mistakes except the CONVERSE, BluePrint Lesson 1

Postby westtech » Sat Jan 26, 2013 3:16 pm

I am also taking the BP online course and the way that I learned to avoid the converse is to really internalize the meaning of necessity and sufficiency. Diagramming is a tool used to abstract the content of the stimulus away from the structure. The answer choices are all phrased in terms of the stimulus (at least on non-principle implication family questions). After you have anticipated the answer choice that you are going to be looking for you can go into the answer choices confidently. The only problem is that both the inverse and the converse will have the same terms you anticipated being in the correct answer choice only reversed or negated but not both. So the best way to combat falling for the inverse or the converse is to think about what they are giving you structurally just like you thought about the stimulus. If the answer choice gives you the necessary condition and it is not negated, and then proceeds to give you the sufficient condition also not negated then you know you are staring at the converse. Also try to explain the answer choices. For example if the stimulus gives you something like (You will get a 170 only if you study hard) and the answer choice tells you that Joe studied hard and therefore got a 170. Try and think about it for a second "is it possible that you can study hard and NOT get a 170"...sure it is because you might have been studying for something besides the LSAT. After you explain the answer choices enough you won't even have to diagram the answer choices because you will have internalized necessity and sufficiency to the point where you will automatically see the converse and the inverse and can't be tricked by it. Hope this helps.

jared6180
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Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:47 pm

Re: No mistakes except the CONVERSE, BluePrint Lesson 1

Postby jared6180 » Mon Jan 28, 2013 2:00 am

you have both helped. I try to sound it out right now and catch the inverse, but because the terms aren't negated I let the converse go. I have started reading it out loud just to be sure though. Out loud I catch the converse easier. Obviously I cant do that come June 10th, but I believe through practice I will learn it better and adapt.

bp shinners
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Re: No mistakes except the CONVERSE, BluePrint Lesson 1

Postby bp shinners » Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:45 am

jared6180 wrote:you have both helped. I try to sound it out right now and catch the inverse, but because the terms aren't negated I let the converse go. I have started reading it out loud just to be sure though. Out loud I catch the converse easier. Obviously I cant do that come June 10th, but I believe through practice I will learn it better and adapt.


Are you not writing the diagrams down? You should be doing that, even for the ACs, to avoid falling for the common fallacies.

As to 'sounding it out', I always recommend my students re-read (to themselves) their diagram as an 'if/then' statement, as opposed to a statement that might have unless/without/only/etc... It's usually a quick way to check if your diagram means the same thing as the statement as written.




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