Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

obsid
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 3:12 am

Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby obsid » Thu Nov 01, 2012 5:37 pm

Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Just wondering as I got a few questions I got wrong, that seem like real mysteries to me, and maybe someone can point out what I missed?

Manhattan LSAT Noah
Posts: 746
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 8:43 am

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby Manhattan LSAT Noah » Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:03 pm

obsid wrote:Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Just wondering as I got a few questions I got wrong, that seem like real mysteries to me, and maybe someone can point out what I missed?

yup - just don't quote the text

User avatar
Br3v
Posts: 4174
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 7:18 pm

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby Br3v » Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:05 pm

Manhattan LSAT Noah wrote:
obsid wrote:Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Just wondering as I got a few questions I got wrong, that seem like real mysteries to me, and maybe someone can point out what I missed?

yup - just don't quote the text


for the record I just like saying this in as many places as possible so ppl read it, noah knows his stuff. I have read countless explanations in the Manhattan threads when I would review my wrong answers on PT's and I found your explanations great.

nefftron
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:55 pm

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby nefftron » Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:44 am

Well, may as well get the ball rolling: Can anybody explain to me why D is the correct answer for problem #7 in the RC section? C seems to have more support for it, while D at best relies on an extremely strict use of a word's secondary definition.

User avatar
PeanutsNJam
Posts: 3699
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:57 pm

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby PeanutsNJam » Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:25 am

I'm gonna bump this because I'm retaking and I'd like to review my mistakes.

However, I vowed to not look at anything LSAT this weekend.

wisteria
Posts: 285
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:43 am

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby wisteria » Fri Nov 02, 2012 5:26 am

nefftron wrote:Well, may as well get the ball rolling: Can anybody explain to me why D is the correct answer for problem #7 in the RC section? C seems to have more support for it, while D at best relies on an extremely strict use of a word's secondary definition.


I changed from C to D literally in the last 5 seconds. Lucky. C didn't sound quite right. Just because this Tucker guy hadn't been studied by the mainstream doesn't mean this author didn't expect his work to be recognized by the mainstream. Does that make sense? That's how I looked at it and why I changed the answer.

nefftron
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:55 pm

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby nefftron » Fri Nov 02, 2012 6:44 am

I mean, that's an acceptable interpretation, and it's why I remember staring at this question for a while during the test. Still, this is one of those "best answer" questions, and there's still the fact that the author acknowledges he's writing about a very obscure figure, the study of whom may not lead to much recognition or attention. That's not spectacular support for the answer, but my real issue is with the answer that is considered correct, that the study of the actor's technique was not based on studying a "preponderance" of his films. The author plainly states that he analyzes every single film of the actor's which is still in existence, and that total comes out to half the actor's films. I'd call that a "preponderance" of his films in this case. The only counter to this I can think of is that one secondary definition of preponderance is "majority," and you could say that 10 isn't quite a majority of 20, but this seems incredibly fussy to me, as well as presumptive given that such a usage of the word
'preponderance' is not the most common use of the word.

Really, though it's imperfect, C just seems a lot better as an answer to me.

Swimp
Posts: 493
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 9:32 am

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby Swimp » Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:37 am

nefftron wrote:I mean, that's an acceptable interpretation, and it's why I remember staring at this question for a while during the test. Still, this is one of those "best answer" questions, and there's still the fact that the author acknowledges he's writing about a very obscure figure, the study of whom may not lead to much recognition or attention. That's not spectacular support for the answer, but my real issue is with the answer that is considered correct, that the study of the actor's technique was not based on studying a "preponderance" of his films. The author plainly states that he analyzes every single film of the actor's which is still in existence, and that total comes out to half the actor's films. I'd call that a "preponderance" of his films in this case. The only counter to this I can think of is that one secondary definition of preponderance is "majority," and you could say that 10 isn't quite a majority of 20, but this seems incredibly fussy to me, as well as presumptive given that such a usage of the word
'preponderance' is not the most common use of the word.


Really, though it's imperfect, C just seems a lot better as an answer to me.


Sorry, man, but there's nothing vague or fussy about this one. "Preponderance" means "majority." Actually, you're making it much fussier than it needs to be-- "10 isn't quite a majority of 20"? No, it's just not. Period. That's the attitude you have to take with these questions. If you don't know what preponderance means, that's one thing. It's kind of an unusual word.

sidhesadie
Posts: 454
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2010 4:54 pm

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby sidhesadie » Fri Nov 02, 2012 10:17 am

I didn't take the exam, so you know, grain of salt on this comment:

Seems to me that when you read "preponderance of his films", what you really read was "preponderance of his films available for viewing". You did a thing in your head that maybe went something like "well ok, only half his films, but, you can't even watch a bunch of those, and he watched ALL the ones that it was humanly possible to watch so surely that is a preponderance, there isn't even anything else that could be watched"

Or something along those lines. (Obviously, I have no idea your actual thought pattern, but you said, well obviously that's a preponderance "in this case". There is no "in this case" in your prompt here.)

That's deadly. You can't add words. Ever. If it said preponderance of his films, it meant preponderance of his films, not of his films 'still existing' or 'available for viewing'.
Don't add words. Sometimes you have to think, ok, if it means *exactly what it says*, then what? Because really truly, it means exactly what it says.

nefftron
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:55 pm

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby nefftron » Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:49 pm

The problem there is that "preponderance" doesn't simply mean majority. It's a secondary definition and definitely isn't the only one that can fit there. Preponderance can also mean a large mass or any decisively large grouping. To use one example:

http://www.gotbrainy.com/flashcards/130

Now, that doesn't mean over half of ALL the money in world is on that tree. It just means that tree has a ton of money on it. Or, if we want a specific film-related use, we can look at this example:

"Part of the reason for the preponderance of films is the time of year — the studios overload theaters at this time of year

--LinkRemoved-- both family-friendly spectacles and award-baiting Oscar hopefuls — and part of it is just my inability to skip any movie that looks slightly interesting to me."

The author here doesn't mean over half of all films come out at that time of year, just that there are more of them than usual and enough to overwhelm him. Here's another one from the Washington Post:

"Whereas last year the registry made history by including the Michael Jackson music video "Thriller," no such surprises grace this year's list, unless you count a preponderance of films from the 1970s."

Here, 70's movies were not a majority, just a big group. I can find dozens of similar usages. This is a valid definition, and one which would easily allow us to say that the film historian had watched a "preponderance" of the actor's films. We don't have any reason to assume a different one, and on the other hand C was also a sound answer with evidence for it that doesn't require being fiddly with definitions.

mcs268
Posts: 251
Joined: Fri Dec 24, 2010 1:03 pm

Re: Can we talk about specific lsat oct 2012 questions now?

Postby mcs268 » Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:23 am

i always thought preponderance meant simply "thinking". this is why i hate the lsat sometimes - they say they define words that aren't common knowledge. i'd say that word as used on the lsat meant simply thinking over, it would be fine, but the fact that they used the second definition is complete bs to me.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ebmus11 and 5 guests