Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Mon Dec 17, 2012 12:50 am

lsatkid007 wrote:Hey G
I'm having problems with RC inference questions. Do you have any tips?


Hey, sorry for the delay, things got busy. I'll say the same thing I told roranoa: I can give you a much better answer if you give me a few examples you struggled with. For anyone else asking a question in the future, I'll say the same thing: it's always easier to explain with examples.

Inference questions are unique in that they tend to depend on specific information *but* the question doesn't restrict things to a particular section. Here's what I do:

1. Narrow down the answers to 1-2 that 'feel' right.
2. Using my knowledge of the passage's structure, find a line that supports my answer choice.

There almost always is a specific line or two that can prove an inference question correct. My RC strategy revolves around knowing the passage's structure (not the details) really well. Then when I need to find a detail, it takes 3-7 seconds.

This is something you can practice. I wrote a post on Reading comprehension drills to test whether you're retaining information. If you read the passage, turn over your book and don't remember anything, you're doing something wrong. But this describes 75% of the students I see.

Learn the passage well, and the questions follow.

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crazyrobin
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby crazyrobin » Mon Dec 17, 2012 7:02 am

Hi, just want to ask a question, I understand we can't talk write down the LSAT questions here, but I was just wondering can we talk about the rules, how to approach the specific LR&LR questions?

Like If I was asking the rules for PT 29 Game 2, will I be in trouble? Legal issue with LSAC?

lsatkid007
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby lsatkid007 » Mon Dec 17, 2012 2:40 pm

graeme wrote:
lsatkid007 wrote:Hey G
I'm having problems with RC inference questions. Do you have any tips?


Hey, sorry for the delay, things got busy. I'll say the same thing I told roranoa: I can give you a much better answer if you give me a few examples you struggled with. For anyone else asking a question in the future, I'll say the same thing: it's always easier to explain with examples.

Inference questions are unique in that they tend to depend on specific information *but* the question doesn't restrict things to a particular section. Here's what I do:

1. Narrow down the answers to 1-2 that 'feel' right.
2. Using my knowledge of the passage's structure, find a line that supports my answer choice.

There almost always is a specific line or two that can prove an inference question correct. My RC strategy revolves around knowing the passage's structure (not the details) really well. Then when I need to find a detail, it takes 3-7 seconds.

This is something you can practice. I wrote a post on Reading comprehension drills to test whether you're retaining information. If you read the passage, turn over your book and don't remember anything, you're doing something wrong. But this describes 75% of the students I see.

Learn the passage well, and the questions follow.


Thanks man.

I more questions on PT33 LG2. When you doing in and out game do you connect the rules before you write them down? I was watching you video and notice you skipped a rule and than came back to it. Do you recommend scanning the rules first to which rules are related to each other before writing them down?

Thanks

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:33 pm

lsatkid007 wrote:
graeme wrote:
lsatkid007 wrote:Hey G
I'm having problems with RC inference questions. Do you have any tips?


Hey, sorry for the delay, things got busy. I'll say the same thing I told roranoa: I can give you a much better answer if you give me a few examples you struggled with. For anyone else asking a question in the future, I'll say the same thing: it's always easier to explain with examples.

Inference questions are unique in that they tend to depend on specific information *but* the question doesn't restrict things to a particular section. Here's what I do:

1. Narrow down the answers to 1-2 that 'feel' right.
2. Using my knowledge of the passage's structure, find a line that supports my answer choice.

There almost always is a specific line or two that can prove an inference question correct. My RC strategy revolves around knowing the passage's structure (not the details) really well. Then when I need to find a detail, it takes 3-7 seconds.

This is something you can practice. I wrote a post on Reading comprehension drills to test whether you're retaining information. If you read the passage, turn over your book and don't remember anything, you're doing something wrong. But this describes 75% of the students I see.

Learn the passage well, and the questions follow.


Thanks man.

I more questions on PT33 LG2. When you doing in and out game do you connect the rules before you write them down? I was watching you video and notice you skipped a rule and than came back to it. Do you recommend scanning the rules first to which rules are related to each other before writing them down?

Thanks


Yes, I connect everything first. Students often fight my advice to do this kicking and screaming, until they try. Generally they get it first try, and find it much simpler than the alternative. I've seen students write every rule + contrapositive and then look for connections, and it usually ends up a mess.

The trick is to write a rule, then connect the next rule to it. The reason for skipping a rule is because that rule didn't share a variable with the existing diagram. A later rule generally adds a variable that was missing, and then the rule can be connected.

As long as a variable is in the diagram, and rule that mentions that variable can be connected. You might have to take the contrapositive.

Practice connecting them from the get-go a few times and I guarantee it will feel much easier than the alternative.

whereskyle
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby whereskyle » Thu Dec 20, 2012 4:51 pm

Logical Reasoning: Do you read the stimulus or the question first?

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Thu Dec 20, 2012 5:49 pm

whereskyle wrote:Logical Reasoning: Do you read the stimulus or the question first?


Stimulus first, but I'm not sure that it matters. JY at 7Sage reads the question stem first, for example, and I'm pretty sure Powerscore recommends the same.

If smart, successful people have contradictory advice on this point, I take it to mean that it doesn't matter.

That said, I think reading the stimulus first let's you read it with an open mind. I reread/skim the stimulus after reading the question stem to try to pre-phrase. My friend Ian wrote better reasons for this than I can on Reddit. See point #2 especially:

http://www.reddit.com/r/LSAT/comments/v ... sat_hints/

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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby klaudiaxo » Sat Dec 22, 2012 8:50 pm

graeme wrote:
jrsbaseball5 wrote:Thanks for doing this!

I am planning on taking the LSAT this coming June and am looking to get started on my studying pretty soon. With all the materials out there and all the possible ways of studying I am a little bit confused on how to get started. That being said, what would you recommend as the first couple steps in beginning my study?

Thanks again.


Hey, sorry for the delay. I wrote a substantive reply, but it looks like it didn't get posted.

A good first step is checking out the free materials from the LSAC. In particular, you should take the June 2007 LSAT timed. It's a bit hard to find everything on the LSAC website, I summarized the important bits in a blog post: http://7sage.com/free-lsat-practice-materials/

I agree there are a lot of companies. How you study depends on your preferences. The most important thing is to get a lot of real LSAT preptests, and use those. Check out the books of ten LSATs on amazon. In particular get LSATs 29-38, 52-61 and 62-67. Total cost is about $80.

Beyond that, the way to go depends on your learning preference and budget. You'll see a lot of companies recommended here. I'd use this site as a filter. It's hard to truly compare different methods, because no one tries two different methods fresh. But any method recommended here is probably pretty good.

1. Like reading? Try Powerscore or Manhattan
2. Like videos? Try Velocity or 7Sage
3. Like learning in a classroom (and have money)? Try Manhattan, Blueprint, Powerscore or Testmasters. Decide between them based on reviews of your local instructor.
4. Are you self-motivated? Just use the preptests, and supplement them with either #1 or #2 as reference materials. Hire a tutor for a few lessons to fine tune your approach, and ask questions here.

I can give more specific advice if you tell me more about your situation and which materials you're considering.



Hi, I had the same question as he did.
I will be using method 1 with Power score and I am taking the June 2013 LSAT. What other supplemental material/month strategies would you recommend?

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Mon Jan 14, 2013 6:51 pm

klaudiaxo wrote:
graeme wrote:
jrsbaseball5 wrote:Thanks for doing this!

I am planning on taking the LSAT this coming June and am looking to get started on my studying pretty soon. With all the materials out there and all the possible ways of studying I am a little bit confused on how to get started. That being said, what would you recommend as the first couple steps in beginning my study?

Thanks again.


Hey, sorry for the delay. I wrote a substantive reply, but it looks like it didn't get posted.

A good first step is checking out the free materials from the LSAC. In particular, you should take the June 2007 LSAT timed. It's a bit hard to find everything on the LSAC website, I summarized the important bits in a blog post: http://7sage.com/free-lsat-practice-materials/

I agree there are a lot of companies. How you study depends on your preferences. The most important thing is to get a lot of real LSAT preptests, and use those. Check out the books of ten LSATs on amazon. In particular get LSATs 29-38, 52-61 and 62-67. Total cost is about $80.

Beyond that, the way to go depends on your learning preference and budget. You'll see a lot of companies recommended here. I'd use this site as a filter. It's hard to truly compare different methods, because no one tries two different methods fresh. But any method recommended here is probably pretty good.

1. Like reading? Try Powerscore or Manhattan
2. Like videos? Try Velocity or 7Sage
3. Like learning in a classroom (and have money)? Try Manhattan, Blueprint, Powerscore or Testmasters. Decide between them based on reviews of your local instructor.
4. Are you self-motivated? Just use the preptests, and supplement them with either #1 or #2 as reference materials. Hire a tutor for a few lessons to fine tune your approach, and ask questions here.

I can give more specific advice if you tell me more about your situation and which materials you're considering.



Hi, I had the same question as he did.
I will be using method 1 with Power score and I am taking the June 2013 LSAT. What other supplemental material/month strategies would you recommend?


I'm sorry, I missed answering this. You don't really need that much material to study for the LSAT. ONE set of strategy materials is usually enough, be it 7Sage, Manhattan, Powerscore, etc. Supplement that as needed from other sources, or by asking questions on forums.

Most of your progress, by far, will come from working with official LSAT tests. So find a bunch, and practice.

I recommend turning to strategic materials at the same time as you do practice tests. For some reason, many students feel they need to complete books and books of strategy before trying any questions.

Instead, read some strategy, then try questions. Once you've done questions, you can turn back to strategy materials, and it will make more sense. Continue alternating between the tests and the strategy materials until you're mostly working with real questions.

Any good program will integrate practice sets into their strategic materials. 7Sage's course uses questions to explain the strategy, and each section is followed by problem sets. I have a set of Manhattan books on my shelf, and they have lots of practice questions. IIRC Powerscore has practice problems at the end of each section.

This kind of went off on a tangent, but hopefully it's useful. The point is, you don't really need that many supplements. You just need to work through practice materials, and review actively to figure out why you're making mistakes.

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longlivetheking
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby longlivetheking » Wed Jan 23, 2013 6:35 pm

hi there,

hope you can help me.

the problem i have is that for assumption questions, whenever i find the gap after reading the stimulus, i sorta block all other answers i'm reading and am inclined to reject them a priori. is that dangerous? my mind just goes to tunnel visioning mode and shoot straight for the answer that shows the gap. and this leads me to this nagging feeling that i might be wrong and i don't have the time to crush every wrong answer choice by thinking it through because of time. did u also have this problem?

also for weaken/strengthen question i never feel like 100% on a question. there's always 10% of me feeling like i'm winging it.

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Wed Jan 23, 2013 6:49 pm

longlivetheking wrote:hi there,

hope you can help me.

the problem i have is that for assumption questions, whenever i find the gap after reading the stimulus, i sorta block all other answers i'm reading and am inclined to reject them a priori. is that dangerous? my mind just goes to tunnel visioning mode and shoot straight for the answer that shows the gap. and this leads me to this nagging feeling that i might be wrong and i don't have the time to crush every wrong answer choice by thinking it through because of time. did u also have this problem?

also for weaken/strengthen question i never feel like 100% on a question. there's always 10% of me feeling like i'm winging it.


I actually think that 10% doubt is very useful. I *always* have doubt as to whether I've got the right answer. It's what lets me avoid tunnel vision. I think I'm right, but I know I may be wrong.

Pre-phrasing is extremely useful. If you find the answer that matches your prephrase, you can go much faster. But you still have to keep two things in mind:

1. Your prephrase might not be in the answers, even if it was a possible correct answer.
2. You might be wrong

For those reasons, I read and consider each answer. I usually skim the five answers first to check for the prephrase. So I don't consider answer A as carefully as if someone had asked me to explain it. But I'll still consider it, quickly.

If I find the prephrase, I quickly check the rest, then move on. I don't know exactly how to open your mind, but try to remember that you might be wrong, and that the other answers could contain useful info.

It's more an art than a science to know when to doubt and when to move on.

As for the doubt: is it hurting you? Or does it just feel uncomfortable? The latter is fine.

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Jcastro1
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby Jcastro1 » Wed Jan 23, 2013 6:53 pm

18 days out from the February LSAT and retaking. I scored a 160 in October after PTing in the high 160s (didn't sleep the night before).

My PT average across 10 tests so far has been 170.9 and my last 5 PTs have been 172, 174, 173, 173, 169.

I've been planning on doing the remaining 12 PTs I have left and drilling the "hardest" games and RC passages.

Do you have any specific thoughts on what to do in the home stretch?

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longlivetheking
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby longlivetheking » Wed Jan 23, 2013 6:57 pm

graeme wrote:
longlivetheking wrote:hi there,

hope you can help me.

the problem i have is that for assumption questions, whenever i find the gap after reading the stimulus, i sorta block all other answers i'm reading and am inclined to reject them a priori. is that dangerous? my mind just goes to tunnel visioning mode and shoot straight for the answer that shows the gap. and this leads me to this nagging feeling that i might be wrong and i don't have the time to crush every wrong answer choice by thinking it through because of time. did u also have this problem?

also for weaken/strengthen question i never feel like 100% on a question. there's always 10% of me feeling like i'm winging it.


I actually think that 10% doubt is very useful. I *always* have doubt as to whether I've got the right answer. It's what lets me avoid tunnel vision. I think I'm right, but I know I may be wrong.

Pre-phrasing is extremely useful. If you find the answer that matches your prephrase, you can go much faster. But you still have to keep two things in mind:

1. Your prephrase might not be in the answers, even if it was a possible correct answer.
2. You might be wrong

For those reasons, I read and consider each answer. I usually skim the five answers first to check for the prephrase. So I don't consider answer A as carefully as if someone had asked me to explain it. But I'll still consider it, quickly.

If I find the prephrase, I quickly check the rest, then move on. I don't know exactly how to open your mind, but try to remember that you might be wrong, and that the other answers could contain useful info.

It's more an art than a science to know when to doubt and when to move on.

As for the doubt: is it hurting you? Or does it just feel uncomfortable? The latter is fine.



hey thanks so much for your reply. its comforting to know high-scorers have doubts when answering questions. now how do u know u're ready to take the test when i feel like i have absolutely no confidence in LR? even though i get most of the questions correct, consistently -2 for each LR. i feel like i should be doing -0 before going to the exam. is that the right mentality?

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:02 am

crazyrobin wrote:Hi, just want to ask a question, I understand we can't talk write down the LSAT questions here, but I was just wondering can we talk about the rules, how to approach the specific LR&LR questions?

Like If I was asking the rules for PT 29 Game 2, will I be in trouble? Legal issue with LSAC?


You can't paste questions verbatim. You can certainly describe the reasoning in a question, and what you're struggling with. You can also say that 'F is before J', assuming that's a paraphrase of the actual rule.

From what's I've seen, the LSAC is reasonably permissive of appropriate paraphrases. They have explicitly stated that we can discuss and explain questions. We just can't reprint them, or too much of them.

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:04 am

Jcastro1 wrote:18 days out from the February LSAT and retaking. I scored a 160 in October after PTing in the high 160s (didn't sleep the night before).

My PT average across 10 tests so far has been 170.9 and my last 5 PTs have been 172, 174, 173, 173, 169.

I've been planning on doing the remaining 12 PTs I have left and drilling the "hardest" games and RC passages.

Do you have any specific thoughts on what to do in the home stretch?


I don't have much to add on the home stretch. It will be different for each student. If you identified a specific weak area (for me it was games), then focus on that. Otherwise, just do lots of timed practice tests, and review them intensively.

Rest well the day before. I wouldn't do any LSAT work. Eat healthy and get plenty of exercise. Good luck!

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:08 am

hey thanks so much for your reply. its comforting to know high-scorers have doubts when answering questions. now how do u know u're ready to take the test when i feel like i have absolutely no confidence in LR? even though i get most of the questions correct, consistently -2 for each LR. i feel like i should be doing -0 before going to the exam. is that the right mentality?[/quote]

You're ready to take the test when you're consistently scoring in the right range on practice tests. It doesn't matter *where* you score your points. You can miss plenty of LR questions if you get perfect games and RC.

That said, -2 is a really good score. As I said early, doubt is fine. What exactly do you mean when you say you don't have confidence? You definitely don't need to be -0 unless you're aiming for a score that requires near perfection everywhere.

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Thu May 16, 2013 12:54 pm

I've been absent from TLS for a bit, busy writing new LSAT books. I've got more time for TLS now, so I wanted to announce my return. My big activity here recently is that I may have proven a flaw in an LSAT question. Waiting to hear back from LSAC.

I should mention that I'm no longer working with 7Sage, though we're still on good terms.

I'm still happy to answer any questions you guys may have, so ask away.

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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby jrsbaseball5 » Thu May 16, 2013 1:09 pm

Graeme-

First of all welcome back! Right now I am going through the Powerscore LR Bible and I am planning on reading a chapter then drilling, then moving on to the new chapter. My questions are as follows:

1. Is that a good strategy?
2. How many questions do you think I should drill to make it effective and really drive home the points? Also, should this be from old prep tests or relatively new ones, or a mix? I have virtually all of them so amount shouldn't be an issue.
3. I screwed up and went straight through the LG Bible without driling, so I learned a lot and improved, but not nearly the amount I should have. How would you reccommend including LG prep into my LR study schedule?
4. Are you going to let us know LSAC's response to your detective work? :lol:

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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby Daily_Double » Thu May 16, 2013 1:10 pm

I think an issue which is often overlooked in LSAT prep is the stress on test day. Many successful testers have expounded upon this issue and the suggestions tend to range from common sense, strict timed conditions at the test center if available, to something a bit more extreme, back to back tests. The suggestions that are somewhere in the middle usually remind the tester that the test he/she will take on the magic, or unfortunate I guess depending upon the student, day is just another PT and should be treated as such. That being said, it's one thing to know these suggestions, and another thing entirely to treat the test as such, being as it is obviously a pivotal 4/5 hours. I mean anyone can, and probably should, take back to back tests, PTs under strictly timed conditions, visit their test center, take PTs at random places, and remind themselves that they're ready for the test, but as we are all aware, preparation is one thing and application is something entirely different.

So what's your experience with this issue? Specifically, how did you approach the test on the big day the first, assuming you have taken it more than once, time? And if that assumption is true, then what changed, in terms of your approach on the date of your first take to your approach on the day of your second take?

Thanks.

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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby Daily_Double » Thu May 16, 2013 7:03 pm

Also, if any other successful testers would not mind sharing their experiences of this issue, I would be interested in your response and would also appreciate it. Just PM me if you don't want to detract from the thread.

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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby Dr. Dre » Fri May 17, 2013 8:26 am

tag

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Fri May 17, 2013 11:50 am

jrsbaseball5 wrote:Graeme-

First of all welcome back! Right now I am going through the Powerscore LR Bible and I am planning on reading a chapter then drilling, then moving on to the new chapter. My questions are as follows:

1. Is that a good strategy?
2. How many questions do you think I should drill to make it effective and really drive home the points? Also, should this be from old prep tests or relatively new ones, or a mix? I have virtually all of them so amount shouldn't be an issue.
3. I screwed up and went straight through the LG Bible without driling, so I learned a lot and improved, but not nearly the amount I should have. How would you reccommend including LG prep into my LR study schedule?
4. Are you going to let us know LSAC's response to your detective work? :lol:


1. I'm a big fan of moving to timed tests as soon as possible. I don't think reading a book will help much, without practice. So I think drilling is a great idea. Theory is only useful with practice.

I think LR question types are overblown. For most of them, the main thing is finding the conclusion, the reasoning, and what's wrong with the reasoning/conclusion. The question stem just changes how you identify the error. So for a strengthen question, you fix it. For a weaken question, you point it out. For a flawed reasoning, you describe it abstractly.

2. Drill as much as you need to get the concepts down. Once you're comfortable describing how to do each question type, you can move past question types to timed tests. Some question types (e.g. necessary assumption, flawed reasoning) may take longer than others, because they are more complex. For example, I think reviewing the wrong answers on flawed reasoning is a great idea, because they will appear on other questions. Making sure you understand them will speed you up.

Once you're comfortable with the basics of the question types, I'd move on to timed sections. Usually it's hard questions, rather than specific types, that will trip you up. And a lot of errors (causation/correleation, number vs. percent, etc.) cut across question types.

3. I think 7Sage's method for LG is very useful (the foolproof method video). Basically, repeat games until you master them. I did this accidently when I first started as an LSAT tutor, because students kept request the same games. On the 2nd, 3rd and 4th time through, I started to get much better at each game, and this improved my technique for ALL games.

The only amendment I'd make to the video is to wait until you've forgotten a game a bit before redoing it. I don't think pure memorization is useful. The goal should be to find the most efficient path through the game, and master the process of finding it. That will help you find efficient paths on new games.

4. I will definitely let TLS know what LSAC says. Probably will be 40 days or so, but I will make sure to let you know. I'm expecting something along the lines of "It's most similar, and therefore correct....", but you never know. :)

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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby Ohiobumpkin » Fri May 17, 2013 11:58 am

How much can anyone trust a LSAT instructor who mistypes the title to their own thread?

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Dr. Dre
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby Dr. Dre » Fri May 17, 2013 12:31 pm

Ohiobumpkin wrote:How much can anyone trust a LSAT instructor who mistypes the title to their own thread?


ad hominem

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Fri May 17, 2013 6:33 pm

Ohiobumpkin wrote:How much can anyone trust a LSAT instructor who mistypes the title to their own thread?


Oops. That's embarrassing. Surprised no one mentioned it until now. Mods, if you see this, can you edit the title so that it says 'ask me anything' instead of 'ask my anything'.

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LSAT Hacks (Graeme)
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Re: Sharing my LSAT knowledge - ask my anything

Postby LSAT Hacks (Graeme) » Fri May 17, 2013 6:41 pm

Daily_Double wrote:I think an issue which is often overlooked in LSAT prep is the stress on test day. Many successful testers have expounded upon this issue and the suggestions tend to range from common sense, strict timed conditions at the test center if available, to something a bit more extreme, back to back tests. The suggestions that are somewhere in the middle usually remind the tester that the test he/she will take on the magic, or unfortunate I guess depending upon the student, day is just another PT and should be treated as such. That being said, it's one thing to know these suggestions, and another thing entirely to treat the test as such, being as it is obviously a pivotal 4/5 hours. I mean anyone can, and probably should, take back to back tests, PTs under strictly timed conditions, visit their test center, take PTs at random places, and remind themselves that they're ready for the test, but as we are all aware, preparation is one thing and application is something entirely different.

So what's your experience with this issue? Specifically, how did you approach the test on the big day the first, assuming you have taken it more than once, time? And if that assumption is true, then what changed, in terms of your approach on the date of your first take to your approach on the day of your second take?

Thanks.


I can't be much use here. I'm not a high stress person. My main technique was making sure I took care of little worries. So I had stuff ready in advance, had like 12 pencils so I wouldn't have to worry about sharpening, had a good eraser. The night before I didn't do anything, and I got a good night's sleep.

If you tend to freak out during tests, then I'd recommend attending one of those proctored tests that companies put on in major centers. About the closest you'll get.

Overtrain your weaknesses. If you get tired easily, do back to back tests. If noises spook you, practice in a cafe. If you're a smoker, practice going without a cigarette for 2.5 hours and take practice sections. Caffeine addict, same deal. Need to eat constantly to think? Stop it, your body adapts. Tiny bladder....well, you get the idea.

The point is to take those worries out of your mind. As for the main worry, 'aah, I'm taking the LSAT!!', just breathe. Most of the panic you get is the fight or flight response. Breathing deeply kicks your body back into normal functioning. Practice breathing and you'll stand a good chance of stopping panic in its tracks.

This is ultimately a very personal question, so take anyone's answer with a grain of salt.

Daily_Double wrote:Also, if any other successful testers would not mind sharing their experiences of this issue, I would be interested in your response and would also appreciate it. Just PM me if you don't want to detract from the thread.


Go for it.




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