The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

TomThompson
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby TomThompson » Sat Nov 03, 2012 8:41 pm

Also congratulations on your score, and making a thread to help the community. I think everyone appreciates it greatly- no matter the optics of the title.

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bizzybone1313
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby bizzybone1313 » Sat Nov 03, 2012 8:45 pm

Noodley, did you supplement your LSAT prep with dense reading material like the Economist or anything else?

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CardozoLaw09
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby CardozoLaw09 » Sat Nov 03, 2012 8:53 pm

lol Noodleys going to be a busy man this month. Open up your own Prep Company dude

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HawkeyeGirl
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby HawkeyeGirl » Sun Nov 04, 2012 12:15 am

Not sure how I didn't know about lsatqa.com before, but this site is amazing!! Thanks for writing this Noodles, I think it'll be a huge help to everyone who wants to retake.

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NoodleyOne
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby NoodleyOne » Sun Nov 04, 2012 11:41 am

bizzybone1313 wrote:Noodley, did you supplement your LSAT prep with dense reading material like the Economist or anything else?


Not while prepping (although I think when I started my prep I was reading Gravity's Rainbow, so take that with a grain of salt). The only magazine subscription I have is Scientific American, but that wasn't for study purposes. That's because Scientific American is awesome.

For those asking if in a month is it worth it to look at MLR or other guides, I'd say absolutely. The last week, other than PTing, I spent my time reviewing stuff in MLR and MRC to tighten them up, and I feel that it helped.

boblawlob wrote:Yo Noodley. When drilling by question type, did you time yourself specifically? Or would you just work fast but not specifically operate under a stopwatch?


I didn't time myself strictly, but I go through naturally really fast anyway, so I was still doing around 1 per minute. Remember, drilling easy is still useful not only to recognize patterns but also to blaze through them quicker.

JDot wrote:question for you....on average, how many days a week did you study? and how many hours a day did you study?


Not counting PTs, starting out it was about 25 hours a week, but, to my shame, the last couple of weeks was more like 6 to 10 hours per week. I was PTing where I wanted to be for awhile, so instead of burning out I eased off the gas a bit. I still PTd two to three times a week and reviewed, but I didn't do as much drilling or book work at that time.

Grazzhoppa wrote:Congratulations on your 179 bro and thanks for making this guide. I was PT'ing around 173 before Oct. and then wen -11 on LR to end up with a 166. Obviously I was very disappointed but I'm starting studying again today. Just ordered the Manhattan LR Guide.

Do you have any advice to improve on games? I went through the LG Bible twice and drilled tons of sections. I'm still getting -2 or -3 and/or running out of time. What did you do to push you over the edge with games? A guaranteed -0 on games is what I'm shooting for. Thanks.


Getting back to basics is huge, and keep practicing on diagramming. That being said, the trip up is on games that don't diagram easily. This isn't an issue I had, so it's hard to teach from experience, but I Would guess maybe timing yourself at 33 minutes a section may get you more used to the time crunch, which is definitely beneficial on test day. I'll expand more on this in a second.

DLA wrote:Question - did you take time off to prep for this test? I have November (with classes and exams; end on the 13th), full December free, and busy January with classes and stuff. Do you have a study pattern that you can suggest? Like a sort of timeline, maybe?

Thank you!

Oh, taking the Feb test. Bombed the October. Also, congratulations =)


I work around 40 hours a week and have a full time girlfriend. That being said I was able to study on down hours at my job. It sucks, but you have to make the time. If you have a girlfriend, it helps if she's understanding. I can PM you later with more details on a study schedule.

aiaea wrote:Noodley, I know you've probably been asked this a thousand times since yesterday, but what is your advice for December retakers? How should they modify your guide? Like, should they just focus on reading the Manhattan guides and doing practice tests? Re-read powerscore bibles and take practice tests? Would really like some advice as I want to make the most of these next 4 weeks and need a good strategy...


This is, once again, something I can't give advice on based on experience, so don't quote this as gospel. The limited time means you need to focus on your biggest weaknesses, or where you can see the most improvement in a short time. I would recommend a lot of you rushing for a retake in december to consider taking this cycle off if it's your third try and you have a ways to go before hitting your target. It's hard to predict what type of bump one can make in such a short time. You could be getting "better" at the test but not seeing a significant score bump because you're fixing systemic issues that are cropping up in all sections (this happened to me early in my retake prep).

For those that insist on taking December, though, I would say focus on your weaknesses and quality PT review. LSatqa.com is an amazing resource that will help out. Review with other people, go back to chapters in MLR on sections you have trouble with. You don't have a lot of time, but you have enough. Don't burn out, but don't be lazy either. Keep the nose to the grindstone and fix your weaknesses. And relax every now and then.
SantIvo wrote:
SantIvo wrote:Noodley,

Question on games retake strategy.

So I took the LSAT in October and scored a 167 -- I went -5 on RC and LR combined, and -9 on games (ugh). My prep has been comprehensive, meaning I've exhausted every PT and have devoted considerable time and effort to this miserable exam. The problem I consistently run into, particularly on the more recent PTs, are "weird" games (e.g. stained glass, the bike game, zones, and the first game on October).

I feel like I've internalized the common patterns well and that I can handle standard game types, but how would you go about prepping for curve balls? I'm good about learning from mistakes on these sorts of games, and tend not to repeat them, but I do struggle on the first pass.

I'm unsure how to proceed, so I'd be curious to hear your (or anyone else's thoughts).

Thanks.


Bumpin' out of desperation.


Prepping for curve balls is something that's really tough to do, mainly because there aren't that many of them to use. I think one way that helps is get really good at basic game types. If you have 3 extra minutes on a hard game because you can blaze through the easy ones, you're seeing a huge benefit there. The other thing to do is have confidence in yourself and the process you go through. Don't stare at the page. If an answer is evident, start writing out a hypo. Most games have a tendency to open themselves up to you as you complete more and more questions. Zones tripped people a lot, and understandably, but I think part of that was panic. If you went through the first question and applied the rules, you would have a better picture of how the game played out. From there you have a decent base to work with, and as you did more hypos you could understand more and more. I said it before and I'll say it again: Good diagrams are a TOOL, but don't let them become a crutch.

Alright, if you have any more specific questions I'll get to them when I can. Good luck guys and I hope you all crush December.

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GabeQuixote
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby GabeQuixote » Sun Nov 04, 2012 12:01 pm

NoodleyOne wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:Noodley, did you supplement your LSAT prep with dense reading material like the Economist or anything else?


Not while prepping (although I think when I started my prep I was reading Gravity's Rainbow, so take that with a grain of salt). The only magazine subscription I have is Scientific American, but that wasn't for study purposes. That's because Scientific American is awesome.

For those asking if in a month is it worth it to look at MLR or other guides, I'd say absolutely. The last week, other than PTing, I spent my time reviewing stuff in MLR and MRC to tighten them up, and I feel that it helped.

boblawlob wrote:Yo Noodley. When drilling by question type, did you time yourself specifically? Or would you just work fast but not specifically operate under a stopwatch?


I didn't time myself strictly, but I go through naturally really fast anyway, so I was still doing around 1 per minute. Remember, drilling easy is still useful not only to recognize patterns but also to blaze through them quicker.

JDot wrote:question for you....on average, how many days a week did you study? and how many hours a day did you study?


Not counting PTs, starting out it was about 25 hours a week, but, to my shame, the last couple of weeks was more like 6 to 10 hours per week. I was PTing where I wanted to be for awhile, so instead of burning out I eased off the gas a bit. I still PTd two to three times a week and reviewed, but I didn't do as much drilling or book work at that time.

Grazzhoppa wrote:Congratulations on your 179 bro and thanks for making this guide. I was PT'ing around 173 before Oct. and then wen -11 on LR to end up with a 166. Obviously I was very disappointed but I'm starting studying again today. Just ordered the Manhattan LR Guide.

Do you have any advice to improve on games? I went through the LG Bible twice and drilled tons of sections. I'm still getting -2 or -3 and/or running out of time. What did you do to push you over the edge with games? A guaranteed -0 on games is what I'm shooting for. Thanks.


Getting back to basics is huge, and keep practicing on diagramming. That being said, the trip up is on games that don't diagram easily. This isn't an issue I had, so it's hard to teach from experience, but I Would guess maybe timing yourself at 33 minutes a section may get you more used to the time crunch, which is definitely beneficial on test day. I'll expand more on this in a second.

DLA wrote:Question - did you take time off to prep for this test? I have November (with classes and exams; end on the 13th), full December free, and busy January with classes and stuff. Do you have a study pattern that you can suggest? Like a sort of timeline, maybe?

Thank you!

Oh, taking the Feb test. Bombed the October. Also, congratulations =)


I work around 40 hours a week and have a full time girlfriend. That being said I was able to study on down hours at my job. It sucks, but you have to make the time. If you have a girlfriend, it helps if she's understanding. I can PM you later with more details on a study schedule.

aiaea wrote:Noodley, I know you've probably been asked this a thousand times since yesterday, but what is your advice for December retakers? How should they modify your guide? Like, should they just focus on reading the Manhattan guides and doing practice tests? Re-read powerscore bibles and take practice tests? Would really like some advice as I want to make the most of these next 4 weeks and need a good strategy...


This is, once again, something I can't give advice on based on experience, so don't quote this as gospel. The limited time means you need to focus on your biggest weaknesses, or where you can see the most improvement in a short time. I would recommend a lot of you rushing for a retake in december to consider taking this cycle off if it's your third try and you have a ways to go before hitting your target. It's hard to predict what type of bump one can make in such a short time. You could be getting "better" at the test but not seeing a significant score bump because you're fixing systemic issues that are cropping up in all sections (this happened to me early in my retake prep).

For those that insist on taking December, though, I would say focus on your weaknesses and quality PT review. LSatqa.com is an amazing resource that will help out. Review with other people, go back to chapters in MLR on sections you have trouble with. You don't have a lot of time, but you have enough. Don't burn out, but don't be lazy either. Keep the nose to the grindstone and fix your weaknesses. And relax every now and then.
SantIvo wrote:
SantIvo wrote:Noodley,

Question on games retake strategy.

So I took the LSAT in October and scored a 167 -- I went -5 on RC and LR combined, and -9 on games (ugh). My prep has been comprehensive, meaning I've exhausted every PT and have devoted considerable time and effort to this miserable exam. The problem I consistently run into, particularly on the more recent PTs, are "weird" games (e.g. stained glass, the bike game, zones, and the first game on October).

I feel like I've internalized the common patterns well and that I can handle standard game types, but how would you go about prepping for curve balls? I'm good about learning from mistakes on these sorts of games, and tend not to repeat them, but I do struggle on the first pass.

I'm unsure how to proceed, so I'd be curious to hear your (or anyone else's thoughts).

Thanks.


Bumpin' out of desperation.


Prepping for curve balls is something that's really tough to do, mainly because there aren't that many of them to use. I think one way that helps is get really good at basic game types. If you have 3 extra minutes on a hard game because you can blaze through the easy ones, you're seeing a huge benefit there. The other thing to do is have confidence in yourself and the process you go through. Don't stare at the page. If an answer is evident, start writing out a hypo. Most games have a tendency to open themselves up to you as you complete more and more questions. Zones tripped people a lot, and understandably, but I think part of that was panic. If you went through the first question and applied the rules, you would have a better picture of how the game played out. From there you have a decent base to work with, and as you did more hypos you could understand more and more. I said it before and I'll say it again: Good diagrams are a TOOL, but don't let them become a crutch.

Alright, if you have any more specific questions I'll get to them when I can. Good luck guys and I hope you all crush December.


How long did you personally take to get from the mid 160s to the 180?

How can we gauge our progress the week before the test? For example some of us were testing in the mid-170s but then got a score in the 160s.

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NoodleyOne
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby NoodleyOne » Sun Nov 04, 2012 12:50 pm

GabeQuixote wrote:How long did you personally take to get from the mid 160s to the 180?

How can we gauge our progress the week before the test? For example some of us were testing in the mid-170s but then got a score in the 160s.


The plateau from the high 160s to the high 170s is probably the steepest, at least to be testing there consistently. I think one of the things that helped me was the review sessions we had, where we would discuss questions in depth. At the high 160s you know the test pretty well, but to get to the high 170s I think you need to know the test at a different level. Basically, you need to know it well enough to teach it. I would recommend encouraging people with a wide score range to come to your review sessions. Explaining even more basic problems to them will be a big help to you. I'm not entirely altruistic ;).

One last thing, for games you find tricky. Remember 7sage has all of his videos on youtube, and I think the lsatblog site has all the videos for games on their site as well. Seeing the thought process on both simple and hard games from high test takers is a huge advantage, and a resource that shouldn't be ignored. Also, talk to the geeks that post on here or Manhattan's forums and Shinners who gives explanations to individual questions. You may ultimately have a different path to the right answer, but understanding the thought process of these guys will let you see the level that they are thinking on.

Edit: As far as gauging performance, I think a lot of what trips people who score below their PT is mental. You go in full of nerves and butterflies, and you forget that this is just another PT. Going in with that mindset helped me a lot on my retake. Also, I would suggest retaking PT 67 to reinforce that just before the test. Know deep down that there is nothing different between this and the 40 other PTs you've probably taken.

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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby chadbrochill » Sun Nov 04, 2012 5:28 pm

HawkeyeGirl wrote:Not sure how I didn't know about lsatqa.com before, but this site is amazing!! Thanks for writing this Noodles, I think it'll be a huge help to everyone who wants to retake.


+1

I knew about the site, but never input my data before. Once you do, you can see the %'s of people who miss certain questions and what trap answers they were picking. I don't usually miss a lot on LR, so if I forgot to mark a question as difficult and guess it right, it gets lost forever. Now I have so much more to review!

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mvonh001
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby mvonh001 » Sun Nov 04, 2012 5:42 pm

NoodleyOne wrote:
bizzybone1313 wrote:Noodley, did you supplement your LSAT prep with dense reading material like the Economist or anything else?


Not while prepping (although I think when I started my prep I was reading Gravity's Rainbow, so take that with a grain of salt). The only magazine subscription I have is Scientific American, but that wasn't for study purposes. That's because Scientific American is awesome.

For those asking if in a month is it worth it to look at MLR or other guides, I'd say absolutely. The last week, other than PTing, I spent my time reviewing stuff in MLR and MRC to tighten them up, and I feel that it helped.

boblawlob wrote:Yo Noodley. When drilling by question type, did you time yourself specifically? Or would you just work fast but not specifically operate under a stopwatch?


I didn't time myself strictly, but I go through naturally really fast anyway, so I was still doing around 1 per minute. Remember, drilling easy is still useful not only to recognize patterns but also to blaze through them quicker.

JDot wrote:question for you....on average, how many days a week did you study? and how many hours a day did you study?


Not counting PTs, starting out it was about 25 hours a week, but, to my shame, the last couple of weeks was more like 6 to 10 hours per week. I was PTing where I wanted to be for awhile, so instead of burning out I eased off the gas a bit. I still PTd two to three times a week and reviewed, but I didn't do as much drilling or book work at that time.

Grazzhoppa wrote:Congratulations on your 179 bro and thanks for making this guide. I was PT'ing around 173 before Oct. and then wen -11 on LR to end up with a 166. Obviously I was very disappointed but I'm starting studying again today. Just ordered the Manhattan LR Guide.

Do you have any advice to improve on games? I went through the LG Bible twice and drilled tons of sections. I'm still getting -2 or -3 and/or running out of time. What did you do to push you over the edge with games? A guaranteed -0 on games is what I'm shooting for. Thanks.


Getting back to basics is huge, and keep practicing on diagramming. That being said, the trip up is on games that don't diagram easily. This isn't an issue I had, so it's hard to teach from experience, but I Would guess maybe timing yourself at 33 minutes a section may get you more used to the time crunch, which is definitely beneficial on test day. I'll expand more on this in a second.

DLA wrote:Question - did you take time off to prep for this test? I have November (with classes and exams; end on the 13th), full December free, and busy January with classes and stuff. Do you have a study pattern that you can suggest? Like a sort of timeline, maybe?

Thank you!

Oh, taking the Feb test. Bombed the October. Also, congratulations =)


I work around 40 hours a week and have a full time girlfriend. That being said I was able to study on down hours at my job. It sucks, but you have to make the time. If you have a girlfriend, it helps if she's understanding. I can PM you later with more details on a study schedule.

aiaea wrote:Noodley, I know you've probably been asked this a thousand times since yesterday, but what is your advice for December retakers? How should they modify your guide? Like, should they just focus on reading the Manhattan guides and doing practice tests? Re-read powerscore bibles and take practice tests? Would really like some advice as I want to make the most of these next 4 weeks and need a good strategy...


This is, once again, something I can't give advice on based on experience, so don't quote this as gospel. The limited time means you need to focus on your biggest weaknesses, or where you can see the most improvement in a short time. I would recommend a lot of you rushing for a retake in december to consider taking this cycle off if it's your third try and you have a ways to go before hitting your target. It's hard to predict what type of bump one can make in such a short time. You could be getting "better" at the test but not seeing a significant score bump because you're fixing systemic issues that are cropping up in all sections (this happened to me early in my retake prep).

For those that insist on taking December, though, I would say focus on your weaknesses and quality PT review. LSatqa.com is an amazing resource that will help out. Review with other people, go back to chapters in MLR on sections you have trouble with. You don't have a lot of time, but you have enough. Don't burn out, but don't be lazy either. Keep the nose to the grindstone and fix your weaknesses. And relax every now and then.
SantIvo wrote:
SantIvo wrote:Noodley,

Question on games retake strategy.

So I took the LSAT in October and scored a 167 -- I went -5 on RC and LR combined, and -9 on games (ugh). My prep has been comprehensive, meaning I've exhausted every PT and have devoted considerable time and effort to this miserable exam. The problem I consistently run into, particularly on the more recent PTs, are "weird" games (e.g. stained glass, the bike game, zones, and the first game on October).

I feel like I've internalized the common patterns well and that I can handle standard game types, but how would you go about prepping for curve balls? I'm good about learning from mistakes on these sorts of games, and tend not to repeat them, but I do struggle on the first pass.

I'm unsure how to proceed, so I'd be curious to hear your (or anyone else's thoughts).

Thanks.


Bumpin' out of desperation.


Prepping for curve balls is something that's really tough to do, mainly because there aren't that many of them to use. I think one way that helps is get really good at basic game types. If you have 3 extra minutes on a hard game because you can blaze through the easy ones, you're seeing a huge benefit there. The other thing to do is have confidence in yourself and the process you go through. Don't stare at the page. If an answer is evident, start writing out a hypo. Most games have a tendency to open themselves up to you as you complete more and more questions. Zones tripped people a lot, and understandably, but I think part of that was panic. If you went through the first question and applied the rules, you would have a better picture of how the game played out. From there you have a decent base to work with, and as you did more hypos you could understand more and more. I said it before and I'll say it again: Good diagrams are a TOOL, but don't let them become a crutch.

Alright, if you have any more specific questions I'll get to them when I can. Good luck guys and I hope you all crush December.


Can you PM me with that info too please.

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megagnarley
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby megagnarley » Sun Nov 04, 2012 11:56 pm

Given that I was hitting 170 leading into the October test and scored a 169, with three hours a day of studying leading up to the December test what do you think is a reasonable score jump to expect?

My breakdown was -4 lg, -1 lr, -6 rc but I did not read any of the guides for reading comprehension

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Captain Rodeo
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby Captain Rodeo » Mon Nov 05, 2012 12:07 pm

Shout out to Noodley here http://www.manhattanlsat.com/forums/post20766.html?sid=d99a67233efa7e1b4e01e0b9dd019d13#p20766

By the way Noodley, when you stated that something
may seem out of scope it actually provides a correlation that a similar situation could produce a similar result, thereby strengthening the reasoning.
, was that from the MLR Strengthen/Weaken Chapter, I haven't got there yet....

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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby boblawlob » Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:11 pm

austinyo wrote:Shout out to Noodley here http://www.manhattanlsat.com/forums/post20766.html?sid=d99a67233efa7e1b4e01e0b9dd019d13#p20766

By the way Noodley, when you stated that something
may seem out of scope it actually provides a correlation that a similar situation could produce a similar result, thereby strengthening the reasoning.
, was that from the MLR Strengthen/Weaken Chapter, I haven't got there yet....

Thanks for the explanation. Regarding the question, I thought when the stim read "the clouds have to be dense to have this effect"...I thought it meant that the dust from the earth could contribute to that denseness thereby rendering D wrong (though, of course...I was incorrect). How do I avoid "misreading" the stimulus like that in the future?

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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby Lear22 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:51 pm

I find this very useful but I am wondering how would a study schedule look for those (like me) who are retaking in a month?

As for me, I have all the time in the world from now until dec test day to just do LSAT prep and I am ready to commit - amid it being hard on me mentaly - for one last month of LSAT.

thanks!

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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby lutcf2021 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 2:40 pm

"Materials Needed:
Manhattan LSAT Bundle: Logical Reasoning, Logic Games, and Reading Comprehension Strategy Guide
Powerscore Logic Games Bible (still relevant, folks)
Cambridge LSAT Logical Reasoning and Logic Games organized by type for tests 1-38
LSAT Prep Tests 40-66
Number Two Pencils
LSAT Answer sheets (regular scantron I guess will work, but you want to control everything you can, and familiarity will not hurt you)
An account at lsatqa.com"


Perhaps a dumb question, but if we purchase the Logic Games portion of the Manhattan LSAT Bundle, do we still need to buy the logic games bible?? Would that be repetitive?

Also, did you have a detailed schedule you went off of? Like what you did on various days building up to test day?

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mvonh001
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby mvonh001 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:20 pm

How valuable are the early PT's (pre-40) for Logic Games. I know they are different now, but im reviewing by going over every LG section of every PT and these first couple of ones I have done are a bit confusing and not like the current LSAT, so my question is this, Would you recommend I do PT's 40-65 3x or 1-65 1x... obviously im going over the LG sections after i finish them and again 3 days later, but then im moving onto the next section. the 1x means how many times im doing it now, and the 3x means 3 times the amount im doing each one now.

Also, would you say that the LR sections of the tests have been the same relatively over the past 65 PT's. So if i was doing PT20-65 for LR that would be ok compared to 40-65 x 2?

Thanks

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NoodleyOne
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby NoodleyOne » Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:30 pm

mvonh001 wrote:How valuable are the early PT's (pre-40) for Logic Games. I know they are different now, but im reviewing by going over every LG section of every PT and these first couple of ones I have done are a bit confusing and not like the current LSAT, so my question is this, Would you recommend I do PT's 40-65 3x or 1-65 1x... obviously im going over the LG sections after i finish them and again 3 days later, but then im moving onto the next section. the 1x means how many times im doing it now, and the 3x means 3 times the amount im doing each one now.

Also, would you say that the LR sections of the tests have been the same relatively over the past 65 PT's. So if i was doing PT20-65 for LR that would be ok compared to 40-65 x 2?

Thanks


Pre-40s has some really odd game types that don't show up anymore, such as mapping and circular ordering games, but they're definitely still viable. Heck, those games are good practice just to get you ready to think outside of the box when a tricky one comes up. Definitely worth it... as to whether you do more total or the same ones over... I'm of the mind that you want the maximum exposure possible, but I know there are arguments for repetition as well.

LR has changed a bit. There are no more one stim - two question parts anymore. Also, some of the wording in older ones is just awkward. Still, a Necessary Assumption is still a Necessary Assumption, Weaken is still weaken, etc. I know the rate of certain question types has changed in the past ten years or so, but it's not like they added anything new. Still viable.

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NoodleyOne
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby NoodleyOne » Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:33 pm

lutcf2021 wrote:"Materials Needed:
Manhattan LSAT Bundle: Logical Reasoning, Logic Games, and Reading Comprehension Strategy Guide
Powerscore Logic Games Bible (still relevant, folks)
Cambridge LSAT Logical Reasoning and Logic Games organized by type for tests 1-38
LSAT Prep Tests 40-66
Number Two Pencils
LSAT Answer sheets (regular scantron I guess will work, but you want to control everything you can, and familiarity will not hurt you)
An account at lsatqa.com"


Perhaps a dumb question, but if we purchase the Logic Games portion of the Manhattan LSAT Bundle, do we still need to buy the logic games bible?? Would that be repetitive?

Also, did you have a detailed schedule you went off of? Like what you did on various days building up to test day?


I didn't mention this in the OP because I'm an idiot, but I'm of the mind that the LGB and the MLG are fairly interchangeable, although that was before 3rd edition Manhattan came out. I haven't seen 3rd edition yet, but if it's as good as many are saying, it may have supplanted LGB as the top choice.

I didn't use a detailed schedule, as my personal schedule is far too erratic. Plus, you need motivation, absolutely, but at the same time, you'll find days where studying just isn't in the cards. If you force yourself when your brain isn't into it, I think it could have adverse effects. I prefer to study organically, but if you're the type that lacks a bit in motivation, a strict study plan may suit your purposes more.

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mvonh001
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby mvonh001 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:40 pm

NoodleyOne wrote:
mvonh001 wrote:How valuable are the early PT's (pre-40) for Logic Games. I know they are different now, but im reviewing by going over every LG section of every PT and these first couple of ones I have done are a bit confusing and not like the current LSAT, so my question is this, Would you recommend I do PT's 40-65 3x or 1-65 1x... obviously im going over the LG sections after i finish them and again 3 days later, but then im moving onto the next section. the 1x means how many times im doing it now, and the 3x means 3 times the amount im doing each one now.

Also, would you say that the LR sections of the tests have been the same relatively over the past 65 PT's. So if i was doing PT20-65 for LR that would be ok compared to 40-65 x 2?

Thanks


Pre-40s has some really odd game types that don't show up anymore, such as mapping and circular ordering games, but they're definitely still viable. Heck, those games are good practice just to get you ready to think outside of the box when a tricky one comes up. Definitely worth it... as to whether you do more total or the same ones over... I'm of the mind that you want the maximum exposure possible, but I know there are arguments for repetition as well.

LR has changed a bit. There are no more one stim - two question parts anymore. Also, some of the wording in older ones is just awkward. Still, a Necessary Assumption is still a Necessary Assumption, Weaken is still weaken, etc. I know the rate of certain question types has changed in the past ten years or so, but it's not like they added anything new. Still viable.


Thanks, so for logic games I should get as much exposure as possible. Even if that means I'm not able to complete some of the games in sections of older LG tests?? Can I skip certain games in the older tests but as I get to the newer tests I shouldnt really skip any of the games? Is that correct, or a fair assumption to make?

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NoodleyOne
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby NoodleyOne » Mon Nov 05, 2012 4:50 pm

mvonh001 wrote:Thanks, so for logic games I should get as much exposure as possible. Even if that means I'm not able to complete some of the games in sections of older LG tests?? Can I skip certain games in the older tests but as I get to the newer tests I shouldnt really skip any of the games? Is that correct, or a fair assumption to make?


I honestly don't know what you're asking. Do as many as you can as thoroughly as you can, but give priority to more recent ones in the form of full PTs.

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mvonh001
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby mvonh001 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:12 pm

NoodleyOne wrote:
mvonh001 wrote:Thanks, so for logic games I should get as much exposure as possible. Even if that means I'm not able to complete some of the games in sections of older LG tests?? Can I skip certain games in the older tests but as I get to the newer tests I shouldnt really skip any of the games? Is that correct, or a fair assumption to make?


I honestly don't know what you're asking. Do as many as you can as thoroughly as you can, but give priority to more recent ones in the form of full PTs.


that answered my question. Thanks

lutcf2021
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby lutcf2021 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:17 pm

So, as far as supplies go.

Would I be solid with just the three Manhattan books,
LSAT Prep Tests 40-66
Number Two Pencils
LSAT Answer sheets (regular scantron I guess will work, but you want to control everything you can, and familiarity will not hurt you)
An account at lsatqa.com

(I'm excluding the bibles and Cambridge LSAT Logical Reasoning and Logic Games organized by type for tests 1-38).

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NoodleyOne
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby NoodleyOne » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:18 pm

I prefer the bundles for drilling, as I think drilling is a crucial element to LR especially. That being said, everyone is different. Also, the LGB was interchangeable with the MLG, and MLG may have taken a jump over the LGB with the third edition.

Lear22
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby Lear22 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:29 pm

NoodleyOne wrote:I prefer the bundles for drilling, as I think drilling is a crucial element to LR especially. That being said, everyone is different. Also, the LGB was interchangeable with the MLG, and MLG may have taken a jump over the LGB with the third edition.



what would be your biggest recommendation for LG drilling? I used the LGB and its workbook so I am not sure if re-working them would be a good idea? I am currently -6 avg on games and it's the hardest section for me to improve in, which really frustrates me as everyone keeps telling me how it's the section where it's easiest to move to -2 and under.

lutcf2021
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby lutcf2021 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:30 pm

I'm about to order the Manhattan books now to commence some drilling.


Two more questions.

...

1) Did you focus on section at a time? meaning, study Games for a week, then reasoning the next week. then games again. then reading...etc. Or just, during one section, blow through all of them in drilling sections?


2) How soon should I invest in a James Brown poster?

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NoodleyOne
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Re: The NoodleyOne's Foolproof Guide to a 179 for Retakers

Postby NoodleyOne » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:32 pm

lutcf2021 wrote:I'm about to order the Manhattan books now to commence some drilling.


Two more questions.

...

1) Did you focus on section at a time? meaning, study Games for a week, then reasoning the next week. then games again. then reading...etc. Or just, during one section, blow through all of them in drilling sections?


2) How soon should I invest in a James Brown poster?


Second first since it's the most important. Immediately.

I focused on studying one section (a la games to competency), but while I was doing it I made sure to drill one section of RC and LR a day to make sure I didn't slip in those sections.




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