Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Taus11
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Re: Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Postby Taus11 » Tue Oct 09, 2012 7:39 am

carboncopyx wrote:
SantIvo wrote:All certainly true and fair enough points. The only question I'd ask, though -- and I apologize if I'm being excessively nosy/adversarial -- is how you made the decision to write the test if you had only recently achieved your minimum acceptable score. Given your high standards, why did you risk having to cancel when you could still see room for growth?


I'd discussed my options with my school's career counselor and the law student next door (I go to college at a T6 law school) in the days before the test, and they both told me that one cancel is nothing to worry about and that if I thought I would get some value out of the actual-day testing experience, I should go ahead and sit for the exam. I wasn't risking a cancel so much as I was going into the test with the intention of canceling (and only keeping the score if I felt like I DESTROYED the test, with 5+ minutes at the end of every section to go over my answers). I got a lot of the experience (the test site, the proctor, getting there, etc.), so I don't regret doing it. I think sitting for the test in October actually made me more confident and calm about December.

sinfiery wrote:The risk is you're playing against the perfect applicant in your head. Which means absolutely nothing.

The real game is playing against the other applicants. Of course, being a perfect applicant is sufficient to win this game but it is far from necessary.


If you find this task too easy, and want to play it on "Hard" mode, I suppose you can carry on.


I like challenges. And I don't like relying on factors I can't control (i.e. other people's relative scores) to succeed.

sunynp wrote:I think that you shouldn't cancel because you need to see what your actual score was. You don't know what the curve will be. It is stupid to cancel because your ego tells you that you didn't do as well as you absolutely could. It is also just something made up in your head because you don't know your score.

I never considered cancelling and i had no idea of how well I did. But I wanted the score to see where I screwed up if I needed to retake. That information is valuable in preparing for the next exam.


See above. Or I can just get to a point where I am getting ~175 on all my PTs so that when I do actually take a test for a score that I will submit, I will know exactly how well I did because of how prepared I will be.




Man, I am getting a lot of pushback against my testing/life philosophies right now, ha.

Hard to know how well you did regardless of what you are getting on PTs. In June I was averaging 4 or 5 points higher than what I got, and I still got a better score than I expected. Preparation alone is no guarantee of meeting your expectations and goals, with so many factors going on the test day.

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carboncopyx
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Re: Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Postby carboncopyx » Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:05 am

Taus11 wrote:Hard to know how well you did regardless of what you are getting on PTs. In June I was averaging 4 or 5 points higher than what I got, and I still got a better score than I expected. Preparation alone is no guarantee of meeting your expectations and goals, with so many factors going on the test day.


I don't know, I just feel that if I'm not taking the test when I'm so comfortable and familiar with it that I KNOW what I'll get when I walk out, then I shouldn't be taking the test for real. Preparation alone is no guarantee, but preparation can get you 95% of the way there (for me, at least). What else do you do--just wait, pray, hope, and see? That's not my style.

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sunynp
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Re: Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Postby sunynp » Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:20 am

carboncopyx wrote:
Taus11 wrote:Hard to know how well you did regardless of what you are getting on PTs. In June I was averaging 4 or 5 points higher than what I got, and I still got a better score than I expected. Preparation alone is no guarantee of meeting your expectations and goals, with so many factors going on the test day.


I don't know, I just feel that if I'm not taking the test when I'm so comfortable and familiar with it that I KNOW what I'll get when I walk out, then I shouldn't be taking the test for real. Preparation alone is no guarantee, but preparation can get you 95% of the way there (for me, at least). What else do you do--just wait, pray, hope, and see? That's not my style.


Did you ever consider that your style is foolish ? I guess it is good that the LSAT can only be taken 3 times. Otherwise you might not ever get past this step in applications.

Do you have some kind of learning disability? No offense but you sound like you are way too focused on how you feel about what your score is, instead of knowing what you actually got. If you felt you bombed it or had to guess at many questions, that might be a good reason for you to cancel. To cancel because you want to walk out of the test knowing your score is idiotic. Even experience test takers can't know for certain what their score is as they leave the exam. Your score is scaled based on how everyone else did.

If you are disappointed in your result, you can retake. But you are assuming a lot based on how you feel, rather than on objective evidence. Get your score first.

Protip: if you ever get to law school, be aware that you will not know your grade until they are released. Classes you feel confident about may be your worst grades.
Last edited by sunynp on Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

Taus11
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Re: Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Postby Taus11 » Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:29 am

carboncopyx wrote:
Taus11 wrote:Hard to know how well you did regardless of what you are getting on PTs. In June I was averaging 4 or 5 points higher than what I got, and I still got a better score than I expected. Preparation alone is no guarantee of meeting your expectations and goals, with so many factors going on the test day.


I don't know, I just feel that if I'm not taking the test when I'm so comfortable and familiar with it that I KNOW what I'll get when I walk out, then I shouldn't be taking the test for real. Preparation alone is no guarantee, but preparation can get you 95% of the way there (for me, at least). What else do you do--just wait, pray, hope, and see? That's not my style.

When did anyone say anything about praying and hoping? My style is to prepare to the best of my abilities, try to perform on the exam and let things play out. It's worked out pretty well for me (174 on a test I almost cancelled). This is why I keep strongly recommending people to let the cards play out and sit on it unless you have a massive disaster. I retook this October just because I have high goals like yourself, but I realize that while I thought I had everything perfected, I still didn't walk out of there feeling super confident. That's how LSAT goes. You seem to think LSAT is some math exam you can bang out and walk out of there knowing you aced it. Cancelling because you didn't feel like you "completely dominate" the test is absurd.

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carboncopyx
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Re: Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Postby carboncopyx » Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:45 am

sunynp wrote:Did you ever consider that your style is foolish ? I guess it is good that the LSAT can only be taken 3 times. Otherwise you might not ever get past this step in applications.

Do you have some kind of learning disability? No offense but you sound like you are way too focused on how you feel about what your score is, instead of knowing what you actually got. If you felt you bombed it or had to guess at many questions, that might be a good reason for you to cancel. To cancel because you want to walk out of the test knowing your score is idiotic. Even experience test takers can't know for certain what their score is as they leave the exam. Your score is scaled based on how everyone else did.

If you are disappointed in your result, you can retake. But you are assuming a lot based on how you feel, rather than on objective evidence. Get your score first.


Your score may be scaled based on how everyone else did, but it's still largely about getting questions right. My goal is to have a consistent string of PTs behind me so that I will be confident in my ability to get things right on the real day. I'm not focused on "how I feel," but more so what my PTs leading up to the test were and if they were consistent. That factor is what will make me feel confident going into and walking out of the test. I am not going to walk in PTing below my goal and wait to see if I somehow managed to do several points better (as was the case in October). That's all.

And also, I do not have a learning disability. My "style" has served me pretty well in life thus far (I'm attending a top-tier university), and I don't really think it's your place to judge what works for me as foolish.

Taus11 wrote:When did anyone say anything about praying and hoping? My style is to prepare to the best of my abilities, try to perform on the exam and let things play out. It's worked out pretty well for me (174 on a test I almost cancelled). This is why I keep strongly recommending people to let the cards play out and sit on it unless you have a massive disaster. I retook this October just because I have high goals like yourself, but I realize that while I thought I had everything perfected, I still didn't walk out of there feeling super confident. That's how LSAT goes. You seem to think LSAT is some math exam you can bang out and walk out of there knowing you aced it. But hey, you do your thing, I will do mine.


My issue is that I didn't feel like I had done all that I could have to prepare myself fully for the exam, so I canceled. I knew I could do better and be more familiar with the test. And I probably won't walk out of the test knowing that I aced it, but that should definitely be my aim, right? Regardless, I don't think there is anything wrong with canceling a score if one doesn't feel like one was fully prepared for it. If you had prepared fully and taken it, sure, you should probably see your score because you had done all you could up to that point. But if you haven't done all you could, what's the point in seeing what you get if you know that you won't like it?

Taus11
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Re: Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Postby Taus11 » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:00 am

Fair enough. Best of luck.
Last edited by Taus11 on Thu Jun 19, 2014 12:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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carboncopyx
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Re: Really Sad, Depressed, and Crying Over Today's LSAT

Postby carboncopyx » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:04 am

Taus11 wrote:Fair enough. Best of luck. I just don't want people to potentially screw themselves over by cancelling like I almost did. I remember someone on TLS recommended that I keep it, and I went with it. I am trying to return the favor. But only you can be the best judge of your performance and your goals.


I'll keep that advice in mind for after December 1, thanks... :)




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