LR Timing -- Prep Advice

drive4showLSAT4dough
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LR Timing -- Prep Advice

Postby drive4showLSAT4dough » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:14 pm

Currently prepping for the Dec test. When I take a section without timing myself, I can generally get -1 or -0. But, this takes around 45 minutes. Does anyone have specific strategies they used to help them close the timing gap without losing accuracy?

Obviously, repetition is huge -- I get that. But if people have any specific timing thoughts, I'd be glad to hear them.

lawks
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Joined: Mon Jun 04, 2012 1:36 pm

Re: LR Timing -- Prep Advice

Postby lawks » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:25 pm

The most important thing to do is relax and focus. At first you may feel like you are going through everything too slowly, but when you look at the clock you will find that you are right on time. When you are anxious about the time or afraid you are going to miss a bunch of questions, you are most likely going to end up reading things over and over again. You can't afford this because there is not time to reread every question twice. It took me some getting used to, but after a while the clock won't give you so much anxiety and you'll be shocked at how many you completed within the time frame without feeling rushed. So, take your time and make sure you are grasping the argument and question type.

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Ex Cearulo
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Re: LR Timing -- Prep Advice

Postby Ex Cearulo » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:52 pm

Sounds like you understand LR and do well under no pressure, so it's time to start working on adding speed to your accuracy.

You have an average of 1 min 25 seconds for each question to get them all done in 35. Start setting a timer for 1:25 and complete a question. Do this a few dozen times to account for varying types of questions and varying degrees of difficulty. This will help you get a feel for how long it should take you, on average, to complete a question.

Once you have done that, start setting a timer for the average time to complete 5 questions, then practice that. Repeat as many times as necessary to feel comfortable and confident (sts) and be nearly always error free. Then do 10. Then 15 or 20. And so on...

Not only will this help build your stamina and awareness of time, you'll get a ton of LR drill work in. Just make sure to keep smart study habits while doing the time drills (i.e. review each question afterward and make sure you know why you got it right or wrong, don't just assess if you did them all in the allotted time or not).

Good luck in December.

-HD

ETA: This is my personal technique. It works for me.

drive4showLSAT4dough
Posts: 304
Joined: Wed May 23, 2012 10:19 am

Re: LR Timing -- Prep Advice

Postby drive4showLSAT4dough » Fri Oct 05, 2012 8:58 am

HawgDriver wrote:Sounds like you understand LR and do well under no pressure, so it's time to start working on adding speed to your accuracy.

You have an average of 1 min 25 seconds for each question to get them all done in 35. Start setting a timer for 1:25 and complete a question. Do this a few dozen times to account for varying types of questions and varying degrees of difficulty. This will help you get a feel for how long it should take you, on average, to complete a question.

Once you have done that, start setting a timer for the average time to complete 5 questions, then practice that. Repeat as many times as necessary to feel comfortable and confident (sts) and be nearly always error free. Then do 10. Then 15 or 20. And so on...

Not only will this help build your stamina and awareness of time, you'll get a ton of LR drill work in. Just make sure to keep smart study habits while doing the time drills (i.e. review each question afterward and make sure you know why you got it right or wrong, don't just assess if you did them all in the allotted time or not).

Good luck in December.

-HD

ETA: This is my personal technique. It works for me.


Makes a lot of sense, and just the type of thing I was looking to try to built up to complete, timed sections. Thanks.

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defdef
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Re: LR Timing -- Prep Advice

Postby defdef » Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:30 am

have you reviewed LR strategies? like manhattan or powerscore? you may understand how to solve them but you may be using a method that is not optimally efficient for speed

you should also try attacking the section 1-15, 21-end, 16-20

the time drilling isn't bad either

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bdeebs
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Re: LR Timing -- Prep Advice

Postby bdeebs » Fri Oct 05, 2012 11:48 am

The biggest thing for me was recognizing problems that would suck up my time and skipping them after giving them a legitimate attempt. There are inevitably about 3 problems per section where I am either not happy with my chosen answer or I can't even choose between two answers choices. Skipping them not only allows me to finish the test without feeling rushed (giving me a better chance on the subsequent questions) but I've also found when I come back to the questions I skipped, the correct answers jump out and it is easier to see why the wrong answers are wrong. This practice was the biggest difference for transitioning from -3/-4 to -0/-2.

Another practice I've adopted is not looking at all the answer choices for certain questions in certain situations. This will feel much more risky if you haven't seen a shit ton of questions, so I'm not advocating that you do this early on in your prep, just saying it helped me with my timing issues down the road. There are certain questions (usually within the first 15) that have answers so predictable that I know exactly what answer I'm looking for. If the CR is A-C, I'll choose it and put a parenthesis around the answer choices I've skipped. This simply indicates to me that if I have time at the end of the section, it would be wise to check over those choices to confirm they are incorrect. If the CR is D/E, I'll glance at the remaining choices to confirm my decision. I generally don't do this in the last 10 questions because the answer choices become more subtle and I feel like they are designed to trick you into picking an answers that sound like a correct pre-phrased answer, but differ in some small respect.

As far as timing, I generally try to do the first 10 questions in about 8-9 minutes, the next 6 in about 6 minutes, and the last 10 in about 15 minutes. This usually gives me about 5 minutes to check over my questionable answer choices.




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