Strategy when attacking "If X, what could be false" qs?

M.M.
Posts: 381
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:16 pm

Strategy when attacking "If X, what could be false" qs?

Postby M.M. » Thu Oct 04, 2012 8:28 am

Am I correct in thinking that upon seeing an "If X what could be false" question, one should start going down the list eliminating answer choices and while doing so, fill those answer choices in to a running diagram for that question / keep filling in each additional must be true you've eliminated, since those letters will always apply in the hypothetical situation provided in the question stem?

I only recently moved onto the more recent PTs which have (more) of these types of questions and this immediately seemed sensible to me.

As an example, PT 62, Section 3, Questions 17-18. On 17 you'd start by eliminating A, and then while doing B you'd remember to put A in the spot that you know must be true.

dynamic28
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2011 12:41 pm

Re: Strategy when attacking "If X, what could be false" qs?

Postby dynamic28 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 2:37 pm

M.M. wrote:Am I correct in thinking that upon seeing an "If X what could be false" question, one should start going down the list eliminating answer choices and while doing so, fill those answer choices in to a running diagram for that question / keep filling in each additional must be true you've eliminated, since those letters will always apply in the hypothetical situation provided in the question stem?

I only recently moved onto the more recent PTs which have (more) of these types of questions and this immediately seemed sensible to me.

As an example, PT 62, Section 3, Questions 17-18. On 17 you'd start by eliminating A, and then while doing B you'd remember to put A in the spot that you know must be true.


"If X what could be false" means that the right answer will be possible or false while the wrong answer has to be true.

For this particular game, a quick glance at your master diagram would lead you right to the correct answers of D and E, respectively. Generally, if there are a lot of "if x happens, what could/must be" questions in a game, that means that you should be looking at multiple diagrams and seeing what diagram you have fits what the question is asking then go from there.




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