LR Drilling vs. doing sections? Dec LSAT

Jdn
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2012 5:48 am

LR Drilling vs. doing sections? Dec LSAT

Postby Jdn » Wed Oct 03, 2012 9:39 am

Hey all,

So I have been bouncing back and forth about writing the December LSAT so I can apply for 2013 because I got a crazy job and wasn't sure how much time I could dedicate to studying. I was a 3.93 GPA undergrad last year and what I had planned to be my gap year with intensive turned into a private contract I couldn't turn down but havn't been able to prepare for the test very well.

My question is because I only have about 2 monthes until the date, am I better to just write a ton of LR sections and get my timing bang on and try and master the question types through experience, or should I read the LRB sections and then drill (I have it all organized by question type PT1-38). I feel like if I had more time the drilling would be waaaaay superior but perhaps I should just try and use my intuition at this point? I am Canadian (US undergrad --athletic scholarship) and had thought if I could break into the 170's I might try and go to one of hte top schools, but if I can't do that it's just not worth it. The quality of education at home is so high and the price is right, so now I just need to get a mid 160's to be a pretty sure bet into all the schools aside from U of T which is about a 168, probably a bit lower with my GPA and softs.

Let me know what all you experienced preppers think!

Thank you so much!

User avatar
hallbd16
Posts: 136
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2012 12:40 pm

Re: LR Drilling vs. doing sections? Dec LSAT

Postby hallbd16 » Wed Oct 03, 2012 12:36 pm

Jdn wrote:Hey all,

So I have been bouncing back and forth about writing the December LSAT so I can apply for 2013 because I got a crazy job and wasn't sure how much time I could dedicate to studying. I was a 3.93 GPA undergrad last year and what I had planned to be my gap year with intensive turned into a private contract I couldn't turn down but havn't been able to prepare for the test very well.

My question is because I only have about 2 monthes until the date, am I better to just write a ton of LR sections and get my timing bang on and try and master the question types through experience, or should I read the LRB sections and then drill (I have it all organized by question type PT1-38). I feel like if I had more time the drilling would be waaaaay superior but perhaps I should just try and use my intuition at this point? I am Canadian (US undergrad --athletic scholarship) and had thought if I could break into the 170's I might try and go to one of hte top schools, but if I can't do that it's just not worth it. The quality of education at home is so high and the price is right, so now I just need to get a mid 160's to be a pretty sure bet into all the schools aside from U of T which is about a 168, probably a bit lower with my GPA and softs.

Let me know what all you experienced preppers think!

Thank you so much!


It seems most people start one of two ways... Either they dive into the LGB and LRB using Pithypike's schedule:http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=41657. You could probably condense this into two months, but be advised it takes a lot of time and mental energy.

For others, they take a diagnostic find out they did not do so well and decide to follow Pithypike or some other comparable schedule, perhaps the LSAT blog one, http://lsatblog.blogspot.se/p/month-lsa ... plans.html.

Then again, some people do very well, as in 170+, and decide to emphasize PT while working through their weaknesses (often by drilling with support from LGB/LRB or the Manhattan series).

Regardless, most people find it helpful to do drill in some extent, whether that is at the start or at the highest levels to work on weaknesses.

Personally I am 6 weeks into my December test prep. Started around a 160 PT and now averaging mid-high 160s. LG is, imo, the most easily improved section. LR is the critical one that separates the 170+, and it requires a good internalization of logical reasoning structures. For me, and many preppers, this is not a natural skill. As such a structured plan for improving LR scores within the 35 minute section time restraints ist critical for realigning my thought processes and thus improving my score.

Final comments, with a GPA like that, you should really be setting the bar high as amazing schools and scholarships are lined up if you score well. It is worth it and you can do it with a rigorous and intelligent prep. Don't underestimate this test, it is HARD but fair.




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