Prep 29, Section 1, # 17, # 15

soyeonjeon
Posts: 86
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:28 am

Prep 29, Section 1, # 17, # 15

Postby soyeonjeon » Wed Oct 03, 2012 2:33 am

#17,
I do see that A is the answer, but
is C not an answer because it's less adequate and less to the core of the stimulus?


Also for # 15,
Would the strategy for this be to focus on the conclusion of the problem?
I at first did not see Since..... of the last sentence and could not find an answer.
but the 'since...' part seem critical for the problem.
Can someone walk me through this actually?

Thanks in advance.

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TripTrip
Posts: 2740
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 9:52 am

Re: Prep 29, Section 1, # 17, # 15

Postby TripTrip » Thu Oct 04, 2012 1:14 am

soyeonjeon wrote:#17,
I do see that A is the answer, but
is C not an answer because it's less adequate and less to the core of the stimulus?

We are not talking about a particular case of cancer, so there's no way we would be drawing evidence from that "particular case." The test makers are trying to trip you up because the words "particular case of cancer" appear in the stimulus, but you need to remember that there is no particular case of cancer mentioned.

soyeonjeon wrote:Also for # 15,
Would the strategy for this be to focus on the conclusion of the problem?
I at first did not see Since..... of the last sentence and could not find an answer.
but the 'since...' part seem critical for the problem.
Can someone walk me through this actually?

The word "since" is used to introduce a casual relationship where the independent variable [the fact that symptoms of cerebral edema resemble those of ordinary mountain sickness] affects the dependent variable [cerebral edema's dangerousness at high altitudes]. Because [cerebral edema's dangerousness at high altitudes] is justified by [the fact that symptoms of cerebral edema resemble those of ordinary mountain sickness], the credited answer choice will break that bond.

We are basically assuming that if someone has cerebral edema, they may be misdiagnosed with mountain sickness and therefore NOT treated for cerebral edema. If the treatment for cerebral edema and mountain sickness were the same, then being treated for mountain sickness would also treat cerebral edema. If this were the case, it would reduce [cerebral edema's dangerousness at high altitudes] DESPITE [the fact that symptoms of cerebral edema resemble those of ordinary mountain sickness].




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