LSAT vocabulary words.

quinnmittens
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LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby quinnmittens » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:29 pm

Why does the LSAT place uncommon vocabulary words into their stimuli and answer choices? I mean, they are assuming people know these unfamiliar words that are not commonly used in everyday conversations. I cam across the word "hastened in an answer choice. "I thought to myself, what does that even mean? And where the hell is Webster?"I mean "Hastened?" at first glance, it sounds like it means to hinder or to put something to a halt. But in actuality, it means to make something happen sooner or more quickly. A person would have not gotten the answer right if they did not know the definition of the word in a answer choice.

There are times that I had to grab a dictionary to see what a word meant just to get the right answer. They even place these unfamiliar words words in the Reading Comp section. Personally, I do not think it is fair. Don't get me wrong, my vocabulary isn't limited, but there are just some words that I don't know. Considering the test is already as difficult as it is, they don't need to make it even more difficult by putting in words that are not commonly used in everyday vernacular. The LSAT needs to stop using big words and use more commonly used words for meanings. I just don't think it is fair to all.

My two cents.

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rinkrat19
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:31 pm

I don't think I ever encountered a vocab word I didn't know on an LSAT. I like to think I have a large-ish vocabulary, but it's probably only average among law students (engineering major who took exactly one literature class ever, and it was Shakespeare, in high school).

YMMV

quinnmittens
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby quinnmittens » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:37 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:I don't think I ever encountered a vocab word I didn't know on an LSAT. I like to think I have a large-ish vocabulary, but it's probably only average among law students (engineering major who took exactly one literature class ever, and it was Shakespeare, in high school).

YMMV


By you saying "your milage may very" highlights my point. You may have an extensive vocabulary, but is it fair to someone who's vocabulary isn't has great has yours to be penalized for it? There are a lot of people who come from backgrounds where they are not exposed to such "words" in every day use. So why should they be punished for it? I'm just saying even it out a bit. That's all. I think it would be very magnanimous of the LSAT to do so.

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rinkrat19
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:41 pm

quinnmittens wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:I don't think I ever encountered a vocab word I didn't know on an LSAT. I like to think I have a large-ish vocabulary, but it's probably only average among law students (engineering major who took exactly one literature class ever, and it was Shakespeare, in high school).

YMMV


By you saying "your milage may very" highlights my point. You may have an extensive vocabulary, but is it fair to someone who's vocabulary isn't has great has yours to be penalized for it? There are a lot of people who come from backgrounds where they are not exposed to such "words" in every day use. So why should they be punished for it? I'm just saying even it out a bit. That's all. I think it would be very magnanimous of the LSAT to do so.


Learned Hand, District Judge wrote:Opinion
If Rose Tostevin, the wife, had been a surety for the loan, it is settled that the payment would have been a preference under section 60b. Swartz v. Siegel, 117 Fed. 13, 54 C.C.A. 399; Re Lyon, 121 Fed. 723, 58 C.C.A. 143. Before insolvency the surety, by payment of the debt, gets through subrogation the status of a transferee, and that status protects him from loss. After insolvency, while he is, of course, still subrogated, his subrogation will not protect him. He must pay without recourse, and he loses to the extent of the insolvency. A payment to the creditor discharges him, therefore, precisely as though made directly to him. Hence it was inevitable that such a payment should be held a preference, whether made to the innocent creditor or to the surety; the effect was identical, whichever course was chosen.

If we now substitute a pledger of property upon the debt of another in the place of a surety, precisely the same situation arises. The pledgor will be entitled to exoneration against the principal. Robinson v. Gee, 1 Vesey, Sr., 251. If the pledge be sold, he is entitled through subrogation to the status of the principal, and upon insolvency he is certain to suffer a loss, measured by the extent of the insolvency. To the extent of the pledge he is the creditor, as much as though he had already discharged his property and taken an assignment of the claim. A payment to the creditor discharging the pledge is therefore a payment upon a claim upon which the pledgor cannot collect; his loss is equally relieved whether it is made to the pledgee or to him. The analogy is therefore perfect, and the same principle should apply to each case. It has in general been held that such a pledgor has all the rights of a surety. Dibble v. Richardson, 171 N.Y. 131, 63 N.E. 829; Bank of Albion v. Burns, 46 N.Y. 170; Price v. Dime Savings Bank, 124 Ill. 317, 15 N.E. 754, 7 Am.St.Rep. 367; *104 Rowan v. Sharps' Rifle Mfg. Co., 33 Conn. 1, 21-24. If so, he must be subject to his disabilities.

The defendant's point is good, so far as it goes, that the delivery was a bailment; but it does not touch the important features of the situation. It was a bailment, but something more; it gave the bankrupt the right to subject the property to the hazards of his own credit which a bailment does not do. When those hazards turned against the pledgor by the bankrupt's insolvency, she became subject to the limitations of all those who had assumed the chance; i.e., that what remained of his property should be subject to a trust for equal distribution. It made no difference in that aspect that the hazard was of the bankrupt's ability to redeem the pledge rather than to redeem any other of his promises. Only in case he succeeded in performing that promise could the parties resume the relation of simple bailor or bailee. This suit attacks, not the redelivery of the property bailed, which, taken alone, would have been innocent, but the necessary payment out of the bankrupt's own estate, which was a condition upon his power to redeliver. He had no right to prefer any one of all those who had parted with their property upon the equal chance that his projects might miscarry and his performances fail.
Decree reversed, and cause remanded for trial.
That's why.

If you can't read seriously dense shit, you are fucked in law school. There are cases from the 1700s written in bizarre-o English. There are big words and absurd phrasing. Cases from the last, say, 30 years are better, but it's still all dense legalese.
Last edited by rinkrat19 on Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

WanderingPondering
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby WanderingPondering » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:42 pm

quinnmittens wrote:Personally, I do not think it is fair. Don't get me wrong, my vocabulary isn't limited, but there are just some words that I don't know. Considering the test is already as difficult as it is, they don't need to make it even more difficult by putting in words that are not commonly used in everyday vernacular. The LSAT needs to stop using big words and use more commonly used words for meanings. I just don't think it is fair to all.


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Ti Malice
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Ti Malice » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:46 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:
quinnmittens wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:I don't think I ever encountered a vocab word I didn't know on an LSAT. I like to think I have a large-ish vocabulary, but it's probably only average among law students (engineering major who took exactly one literature class ever, and it was Shakespeare, in high school).

YMMV


By you saying "your milage may very" highlights my point. You may have an extensive vocabulary, but is it fair to someone who's vocabulary isn't has great has yours to be penalized for it? There are a lot of people who come from backgrounds where they are not exposed to such "words" in every day use. So why should they be punished for it? I'm just saying even it out a bit. That's all. I think it would be very magnanimous of the LSAT to do so.


Learned Hand, District Judge wrote:Opinion
If Rose Tostevin, the wife, had been a surety for the loan, it is settled that the payment would have been a preference under section 60b. Swartz v. Siegel, 117 Fed. 13, 54 C.C.A. 399; Re Lyon, 121 Fed. 723, 58 C.C.A. 143. Before insolvency the surety, by payment of the debt, gets through subrogation the status of a transferee, and that status protects him from loss. After insolvency, while he is, of course, still subrogated, his subrogation will not protect him. He must pay without recourse, and he loses to the extent of the insolvency. A payment to the creditor discharges him, therefore, precisely as though made directly to him. Hence it was inevitable that such a payment should be held a preference, whether made to the innocent creditor or to the surety; the effect was identical, whichever course was chosen.

If we now substitute a pledger of property upon the debt of another in the place of a surety, precisely the same situation arises. The pledgor will be entitled to exoneration against the principal. Robinson v. Gee, 1 Vesey, Sr., 251. If the pledge be sold, he is entitled through subrogation to the status of the principal, and upon insolvency he is certain to suffer a loss, measured by the extent of the insolvency. To the extent of the pledge he is the creditor, as much as though he had already discharged his property and taken an assignment of the claim. A payment to the creditor discharging the pledge is therefore a payment upon a claim upon which the pledgor cannot collect; his loss is equally relieved whether it is made to the pledgee or to him. The analogy is therefore perfect, and the same principle should apply to each case. It has in general been held that such a pledgor has all the rights of a surety. Dibble v. Richardson, 171 N.Y. 131, 63 N.E. 829; Bank of Albion v. Burns, 46 N.Y. 170; Price v. Dime Savings Bank, 124 Ill. 317, 15 N.E. 754, 7 Am.St.Rep. 367; *104 Rowan v. Sharps' Rifle Mfg. Co., 33 Conn. 1, 21-24. If so, he must be subject to his disabilities.

The defendant's point is good, so far as it goes, that the delivery was a bailment; but it does not touch the important features of the situation. It was a bailment, but something more; it gave the bankrupt the right to subject the property to the hazards of his own credit which a bailment does not do. When those hazards turned against the pledgor by the bankrupt's insolvency, she became subject to the limitations of all those who had assumed the chance; i.e., that what remained of his property should be subject to a trust for equal distribution. It made no difference in that aspect that the hazard was of the bankrupt's ability to redeem the pledge rather than to redeem any other of his promises. Only in case he succeeded in performing that promise could the parties resume the relation of simple bailor or bailee. This suit attacks, not the redelivery of the property bailed, which, taken alone, would have been innocent, but the necessary payment out of the bankrupt's own estate, which was a condition upon his power to redeliver. He had no right to prefer any one of all those who had parted with their property upon the equal chance that his projects might miscarry and his performances fail.
Decree reversed, and cause remanded for trial.
That's why.

If you can't read seriously dense shit, you are fucked in law school. There are cases from the 1700s written in bizarre-o English. There are big words and absurd phrasing. Cases from the last, say, 30 years are better, but it's still all dense legalese.


/thread

quinnmittens
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby quinnmittens » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:49 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:
quinnmittens wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:I don't think I ever encountered a vocab word I didn't know on an LSAT. I like to think I have a large-ish vocabulary, but it's probably only average among law students (engineering major who took exactly one literature class ever, and it was Shakespeare, in high school).

YMMV


By you saying "your milage may very" highlights my point. You may have an extensive vocabulary, but is it fair to someone who's vocabulary isn't has great has yours to be penalized for it? There are a lot of people who come from backgrounds where they are not exposed to such "words" in every day use. So why should they be punished for it? I'm just saying even it out a bit. That's all. I think it would be very magnanimous of the LSAT to do so.


Learned Hand, District Judge wrote:Opinion
If Rose Tostevin, the wife, had been a surety for the loan, it is settled that the payment would have been a preference under section 60b. Swartz v. Siegel, 117 Fed. 13, 54 C.C.A. 399; Re Lyon, 121 Fed. 723, 58 C.C.A. 143. Before insolvency the surety, by payment of the debt, gets through subrogation the status of a transferee, and that status protects him from loss. After insolvency, while he is, of course, still subrogated, his subrogation will not protect him. He must pay without recourse, and he loses to the extent of the insolvency. A payment to the creditor discharges him, therefore, precisely as though made directly to him. Hence it was inevitable that such a payment should be held a preference, whether made to the innocent creditor or to the surety; the effect was identical, whichever course was chosen.

If we now substitute a pledger of property upon the debt of another in the place of a surety, precisely the same situation arises. The pledgor will be entitled to exoneration against the principal. Robinson v. Gee, 1 Vesey, Sr., 251. If the pledge be sold, he is entitled through subrogation to the status of the principal, and upon insolvency he is certain to suffer a loss, measured by the extent of the insolvency. To the extent of the pledge he is the creditor, as much as though he had already discharged his property and taken an assignment of the claim. A payment to the creditor discharging the pledge is therefore a payment upon a claim upon which the pledgor cannot collect; his loss is equally relieved whether it is made to the pledgee or to him. The analogy is therefore perfect, and the same principle should apply to each case. It has in general been held that such a pledgor has all the rights of a surety. Dibble v. Richardson, 171 N.Y. 131, 63 N.E. 829; Bank of Albion v. Burns, 46 N.Y. 170; Price v. Dime Savings Bank, 124 Ill. 317, 15 N.E. 754, 7 Am.St.Rep. 367; *104 Rowan v. Sharps' Rifle Mfg. Co., 33 Conn. 1, 21-24. If so, he must be subject to his disabilities.

The defendant's point is good, so far as it goes, that the delivery was a bailment; but it does not touch the important features of the situation. It was a bailment, but something more; it gave the bankrupt the right to subject the property to the hazards of his own credit which a bailment does not do. When those hazards turned against the pledgor by the bankrupt's insolvency, she became subject to the limitations of all those who had assumed the chance; i.e., that what remained of his property should be subject to a trust for equal distribution. It made no difference in that aspect that the hazard was of the bankrupt's ability to redeem the pledge rather than to redeem any other of his promises. Only in case he succeeded in performing that promise could the parties resume the relation of simple bailor or bailee. This suit attacks, not the redelivery of the property bailed, which, taken alone, would have been innocent, but the necessary payment out of the bankrupt's own estate, which was a condition upon his power to redeliver. He had no right to prefer any one of all those who had parted with their property upon the equal chance that his projects might miscarry and his performances fail.
Decree reversed, and cause remanded for trial.
That's why.

If you can't read seriously dense shit, you are fucked in law school. There are cases from the 1700s written in bizarre-o English. There are big words and absurd phrasing. Cases from the last, say, 30 years are better, but it's still all dense legalese.



So are you saying if you don't know big words you don't belong in Law School? I understand your point, but you have the opportunity to grab a dictionary and look up the word for clarification when reading court opinions, briefs, etc. Everybody knows law school has a lot of reading, that isn't the point. The point is you don't need to place words that some people may find unfamiliar on the test. I feel like they are assuming people are walking dictionaries. I know I'm not.

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Davidbentley
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Davidbentley » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:50 pm

Image

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Pocahontas
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Pocahontas » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:52 pm

Davidbentley wrote:Image


^ what I was thinking

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Cerebro
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Cerebro » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:00 pm

Since the LSAT is geared toward college-educated people who are desirous of entering law school and eventually becoming lawyers, I think they may correctly assume that the people taking the test have a college-level vocabulary. To be honest, I don't think I've seen any words on the LSAT, aside from scientific or specialized terms that are proximately** defined within the passage or stimulus, which I did not encounter while preparing for the SAT, when I was in high school.


Just in case....

** prox·i·mate [prok-suh-mit] adjective
1. next; nearest; immediately before or after in order, place, occurrence, etc.
2. close; very near.
3. approximate; fairly accurate.
4. forthcoming; imminent.

proximately or proximal — adv

quinnmittens
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby quinnmittens » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:08 pm

Davidbentley wrote:Image


Wow, ya'll trying to play me with the statistics. It's a 8th grade level word, so you are implying I should be embarrassed. I am not ashamed of not being familiar with a word just because some statistics said I should. I grew up in the streets and went to a under-funded public school and then went onto college, which was public by the way. So excuse me for not knowing a 8th grade level word. My bad. All I am saying is NOT every body knows words that other people do not. Like I said before, people come different backgrounds. Foreigners even take this test. I know somebody who speaks english as a second language who doesn't know words that I do, should he not be entitled to take the test because of his limited vocabulary? The LSAT needs to reconginze this and not assume people know words even if it is seems to be rudimentary for a person with a degree. Keep it real, you know you don't go around with vocal flash cards from the 8th grade, 9th grade nor do you remember words from your 6th grade vocab test Mr. Smith gave you back in the day. I'm just saying keep it general and free of ambiguity. That is all.

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Cobretti
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Cobretti » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:12 pm

the LSAT is a differentiator among applicants. It is designed to show your weaknesses. Particularly the reading comprehension part of the LSAT is used to determine how well you can understand dense and convoluted writing. If you have difficulty understanding complex writing it is isn't only fair, it is the purpose of the LSAT, to expose that weakness.

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Cerebro
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Cerebro » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:15 pm

quinnmittens wrote:
Davidbentley wrote:Image


Wow, ya'll trying to play me with the statistics. It's a 8th grade level word, so you are implying I should be embarrassed. I am not ashamed of not being familiar with a word just because some statistics said I should. I grew up in the streets and went to a under-funded public school and then went onto college, which was public by the way. So excuse me for not knowing a 8th grade level word. My bad. All I am saying is NOT every body knows words that other people do not. Like I said before, people come different backgrounds. Foreigners even take this test. I know somebody who speaks english as a second language who doesn't know words that I do, should he not be entitled to take the test because of his limited vocabulary? The LSAT needs to reconginze this and not assume people know words even if it is seems to be rudimentary for a person with a degree. Keep it real, you know you don't go around with vocal flash cards from the 8th grade, 9th grade nor do you remember words from your 6th grade vocab test Mr. Smith gave you back in the day. I'm just saying keep it general and free of ambiguity. That is all.


It's interesting to me that 9 times out of 10, the people who complain about something (like a vocabulary word) not being fair are the same ones who blame society/circumstances/environment/whatever for their own shortcomings. Yeah, nobody walks around with vocab flashcards, but we read, we learn, and our vocabulary grows. If you struggle with vocabulary, don't demand that the test be lowered to your level. Rather, try to pull yourself up, and learn the vocabulary.

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rinkrat19
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:15 pm

quinnmittens wrote:Wow, ya'll trying to play me with the statistics. It's a 8th grade level word, so you are implying I should be embarrassed. I am not ashamed of not being familiar with a word just because some statistics said I should. I grew up in the streets and went to a under-funded public school and then went onto college, which was public by the way. So excuse me for not knowing a 8th grade level word. My bad. All I am saying is NOT every body knows words that other people do not. Like I said before, people come different backgrounds. Foreigners even take this test. I know somebody who speaks english as a second language who doesn't know words that I do, should he not be entitled to take the test because of his limited vocabulary? The LSAT needs to reconginze this and not assume people know words even if it is seems to be rudimentary for a person with a degree. Keep it real, you know you don't go around with vocal flash cards from the 8th grade, 9th grade nor do you remember words from your 6th grade vocab test Mr. Smith gave you back in the day. I'm just saying keep it general and free of ambiguity. That is all.
If it were just a general intelligence test, there would be some argument for letting people take the LSAT in a foreign language to test their innate brainpower. But the test is designed to predict how someone will do in an American law school. (It's not a perfect predictor, statistically, but it is the best one anyone has come up with.) Law school in the US is taught in English, heavily laden with legalese.

I sympathize with non-native speakers struggling to achieve the level of English fluency that the LSAT requires, but the many Chinese students in my classes didn't expect to take the LSAT in Mandarin. They studied their asses off and got there.

My vocabulary doesn't come from classes (see Engineering, Supra), it comes from reading. And I'm not talking Dostoyevsky. British fiction is great for improving the vocabulary, because their speech patterns are a bit more formal but you can still be reading a detective story or a romance.

Take a couple of a years and read everything you can get your hands on. (Scientific American and The Economist are also good, if less entertaining.) Your vocabulary and your LSAT score will thank you.

paradoxpredator
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby paradoxpredator » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:19 pm

Cerebro wrote:Since the LSAT is geared toward college-educated people who are desirous of entering law school and eventually becoming lawyers, I think they may correctly assume that the people taking the test have a college-level vocabulary. To be honest, I don't think I've seen any words on the LSAT, aside from scientific or specialized terms that are proximately** defined within the passage or stimulus, which I did not encounter while preparing for the SAT, when I was in high school.


Just in case....

** prox·i·mate [prok-suh-mit] adjective
1. next; nearest; immediately before or after in order, place, occurrence, etc.
2. close; very near.
3. approximate; fairly accurate.
4. forthcoming; imminent.

proximately or proximal — adv


That is so rude to place the definition of the word in such a condescending way. I even feel your tone is condescending and I don't even know you. Yes college educated people take the test, I agree with you on that point. I do agree about the comment of people coming from different backgrounds (A kid from the inner city vs one from suburbia). But, some people don't remember certain words nor used them as frequently as others. Hastened is a word that I may of heard of once or twice. I think what he is saying is the lsat should not use words that are NOT commonly used in conversations, no matter how rudimentary the word may be. Not saying "hastened" is a big word but, I don't walk around using big words at all in conversations. I think it is pretentious and unimpressive. "After I left from work, I hastened back to my house" PLEASE!



"I'm running through her purse like Frank Gore for the first"

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rinkrat19
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:20 pm

paradoxpredator wrote:
Cerebro wrote:Since the LSAT is geared toward college-educated people who are desirous of entering law school and eventually becoming lawyers, I think they may correctly assume that the people taking the test have a college-level vocabulary. To be honest, I don't think I've seen any words on the LSAT, aside from scientific or specialized terms that are proximately** defined within the passage or stimulus, which I did not encounter while preparing for the SAT, when I was in high school.


Just in case....

** prox·i·mate [prok-suh-mit] adjective
1. next; nearest; immediately before or after in order, place, occurrence, etc.
2. close; very near.
3. approximate; fairly accurate.
4. forthcoming; imminent.

proximately or proximal — adv


That is so rude to place the definition of the word in such a condescending way. I even feel your tone is condescending and I don't even know you. Yes college educated people take the test, I agree with you on that point. I do agree about the comment of people coming from different backgrounds (A kid from the inner city vs one from suburbia). But, some people don't remember certain words nor used them as frequently as others. Hastened is a word that I may of heard of once or twice. I think what he is saying is the lsat should not use words that are NOT commonly used in conversations, no matter how rudimentary the word may be. Not saying "hastened" is a big word but, I don't walk around using big words at all in conversations. I think it is pretentious and unimpressive. "After I left from work, I hastened back to my house" PLEASE!



"I'm running through her purse like Frank Gore for the first"
Legal opinions are not written in conversational English.

paradoxpredator
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby paradoxpredator » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:29 pm

Cerebro wrote:
quinnmittens wrote:
Davidbentley wrote:Image


Wow, ya'll trying to play me with the statistics. It's a 8th grade level word, so you are implying I should be embarrassed. I am not ashamed of not being familiar with a word just because some statistics said I should. I grew up in the streets and went to a under-funded public school and then went onto college, which was public by the way. So excuse me for not knowing a 8th grade level word. My bad. All I am saying is NOT every body knows words that other people do not. Like I said before, people come different backgrounds. Foreigners even take this test. I know somebody who speaks english as a second language who doesn't know words that I do, should he not be entitled to take the test because of his limited vocabulary? The LSAT needs to reconginze this and not assume people know words even if it is seems to be rudimentary for a person with a degree. Keep it real, you know you don't go around with vocal flash cards from the 8th grade, 9th grade nor do you remember words from your 6th grade vocab test Mr. Smith gave you back in the day. I'm just saying keep it general and free of ambiguity. That is all.


It's interesting to me that 9 times out of 10, the people who complain about something (like a vocabulary word) not being fair are the same ones who blame society/circumstances/environment/whatever for their own shortcomings. Yeah, nobody walks around with vocab flashcards, but we read, we learn, and our vocabulary grows. If you struggle with vocabulary, don't demand that the test be lowered to your level. Rather, try to pull yourself up, and learn the vocabulary.


So you remember every word you come across? You do vocab lessons in the morning bruh? Keep it real...

The commonality of certain words used on the LSAT seems to be the issue, not the word itself.

paradoxpredator
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby paradoxpredator » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:33 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:
paradoxpredator wrote:
Cerebro wrote:Since the LSAT is geared toward college-educated people who are desirous of entering law school and eventually becoming lawyers, I think they may correctly assume that the people taking the test have a college-level vocabulary. To be honest, I don't think I've seen any words on the LSAT, aside from scientific or specialized terms that are proximately** defined within the passage or stimulus, which I did not encounter while preparing for the SAT, when I was in high school.


Just in case....

** prox·i·mate [prok-suh-mit] adjective
1. next; nearest; immediately before or after in order, place, occurrence, etc.
2. close; very near.
3. approximate; fairly accurate.
4. forthcoming; imminent.

proximately or proximal — adv


That is so rude to place the definition of the word in such a condescending way. I even feel your tone is condescending and I don't even know you. Yes college educated people take the test, I agree with you on that point. I do agree about the comment of people coming from different backgrounds (A kid from the inner city vs one from suburbia). But, some people don't remember certain words nor used them as frequently as others. Hastened is a word that I may of heard of once or twice. I think what he is saying is the lsat should not use words that are NOT commonly used in conversations, no matter how rudimentary the word may be. Not saying "hastened" is a big word but, I don't walk around using big words at all in conversations. I think it is pretentious and unimpressive. "After I left from work, I hastened back to my house" PLEASE!



"I'm running through her purse like Frank Gore for the first"
Legal opinions are not written in conversational English.



True. Like the original poster said, you also can consult a dictionary as you read said opinion. You don't have that luxury for the LSAT.

"I'm running through her purse like Frank Gore for the first"

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steel_shot
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby steel_shot » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:35 pm

I know my vocabulary isn't amazing, especially for dictionary definitions. I usually understand words in context when I see it in a book, or even on exams, but there have been a few times where I missed a question because I didn't understand the vocabulary. I looked up the word, made note of it and didn't make the same mistake twice. I agree the language is a bit challenging, but I mean it takes no effort to look up the word and make a note of it...

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rinkrat19
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:35 pm

paradoxpredator wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
paradoxpredator wrote:
Cerebro wrote:Since the LSAT is geared toward college-educated people who are desirous of entering law school and eventually becoming lawyers, I think they may correctly assume that the people taking the test have a college-level vocabulary. To be honest, I don't think I've seen any words on the LSAT, aside from scientific or specialized terms that are proximately** defined within the passage or stimulus, which I did not encounter while preparing for the SAT, when I was in high school.


Just in case....

** prox·i·mate [prok-suh-mit] adjective
1. next; nearest; immediately before or after in order, place, occurrence, etc.
2. close; very near.
3. approximate; fairly accurate.
4. forthcoming; imminent.

proximately or proximal — adv


That is so rude to place the definition of the word in such a condescending way. I even feel your tone is condescending and I don't even know you. Yes college educated people take the test, I agree with you on that point. I do agree about the comment of people coming from different backgrounds (A kid from the inner city vs one from suburbia). But, some people don't remember certain words nor used them as frequently as others. Hastened is a word that I may of heard of once or twice. I think what he is saying is the lsat should not use words that are NOT commonly used in conversations, no matter how rudimentary the word may be. Not saying "hastened" is a big word but, I don't walk around using big words at all in conversations. I think it is pretentious and unimpressive. "After I left from work, I hastened back to my house" PLEASE!



"I'm running through her purse like Frank Gore for the first"
Legal opinions are not written in conversational English.



True. Like the original poster said, you also can consult a dictionary as you read said opinion. You don't have that luxury for the LSAT.
You also don't have infinite time in which to do your reading.
Going to law school with a sub-par vocabulary would be like deciding to climb Everest without oxygen. A few remarkable people successfully do it, but more often they have to use air or they fall into a crevasse and freeze to death.

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CardozoLaw09
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby CardozoLaw09 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:36 pm

I won't lie I've had to look up a word here and there as well -- nothing to be ashamed about, OP

quinnmittens
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby quinnmittens » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:38 pm

steel_shot wrote:I know my vocabulary isn't amazing, especially for dictionary definitions. I usually understand words in context when I see it in a book, or even on exams, but there have been a few times where I missed a question because I didn't understand the vocabulary. I looked up the word, made note of it and didn't make the same mistake twice. I agree the language is a bit challenging, but I mean it takes no effort to look up the word and make a note of it...


Same here. It is fairly simple to do that. But on the actual test you come across a word you don't understand, your ass is grass.

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Cerebro
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Cerebro » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:40 pm

paradoxpredator wrote:
Cerebro wrote:
quinnmittens wrote:
Davidbentley wrote:Image


Wow, ya'll trying to play me with the statistics. It's a 8th grade level word, so you are implying I should be embarrassed. I am not ashamed of not being familiar with a word just because some statistics said I should. I grew up in the streets and went to a under-funded public school and then went onto college, which was public by the way. So excuse me for not knowing a 8th grade level word. My bad. All I am saying is NOT every body knows words that other people do not. Like I said before, people come different backgrounds. Foreigners even take this test. I know somebody who speaks english as a second language who doesn't know words that I do, should he not be entitled to take the test because of his limited vocabulary? The LSAT needs to reconginze this and not assume people know words even if it is seems to be rudimentary for a person with a degree. Keep it real, you know you don't go around with vocal flash cards from the 8th grade, 9th grade nor do you remember words from your 6th grade vocab test Mr. Smith gave you back in the day. I'm just saying keep it general and free of ambiguity. That is all.


It's interesting to me that 9 times out of 10, the people who complain about something (like a vocabulary word) not being fair are the same ones who blame society/circumstances/environment/whatever for their own shortcomings. Yeah, nobody walks around with vocab flashcards, but we read, we learn, and our vocabulary grows. If you struggle with vocabulary, don't demand that the test be lowered to your level. Rather, try to pull yourself up, and learn the vocabulary.


So you remember every word you come across? You do vocab lessons in the morning bruh? Keep it real...

The commonality of certain words used on the LSAT seems to be the issue, not the word itself.


I am keeping it real, "bruh"... I read quite extensively in subjects including Technology/Engineering, English and American Literature, Philosophy, and Criticism. I don't have to do vocab lessons, because I do remember the words I read and I know how to use them.

However, you don't need to look any further than yesterday's newspaper to see an example of the word hastened being used. http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2 ... ayton.html

It can't be too uncommon a word if it is used in news headlines, eh?

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rinkrat19
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:41 pm

Cerebro wrote:
paradoxpredator wrote:
Cerebro wrote:It's interesting to me that 9 times out of 10, the people who complain about something (like a vocabulary word) not being fair are the same ones who blame society/circumstances/environment/whatever for their own shortcomings. Yeah, nobody walks around with vocab flashcards, but we read, we learn, and our vocabulary grows. If you struggle with vocabulary, don't demand that the test be lowered to your level. Rather, try to pull yourself up, and learn the vocabulary.


So you remember every word you come across? You do vocab lessons in the morning bruh? Keep it real...

The commonality of certain words used on the LSAT seems to be the issue, not the word itself.


I am keeping it real, "bruh"... I read quite extensively in subjects including Technology/Engineering, English and American Literature, Philosophy, and Criticism. I don't have to do vocab lessons, because I do remember the words I read and I know how to use them.

However, you don't need to look any further than yesterday's newspaper to see an example of the word hastened being used. http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2 ... ayton.html

It can't be too uncommon a word if it is used in news headlines, eh?
Pfft, that's a Canadian news site. They don't speak American!

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Cerebro
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Re: LSAT vocabulary words.

Postby Cerebro » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:47 pm

paradoxpredator wrote:
Cerebro wrote:Since the LSAT is geared toward college-educated people who are desirous of entering law school and eventually becoming lawyers, I think they may correctly assume that the people taking the test have a college-level vocabulary. To be honest, I don't think I've seen any words on the LSAT, aside from scientific or specialized terms that are proximately** defined within the passage or stimulus, which I did not encounter while preparing for the SAT, when I was in high school.


Just in case....

** prox·i·mate [prok-suh-mit] adjective
1. next; nearest; immediately before or after in order, place, occurrence, etc.
2. close; very near.
3. approximate; fairly accurate.
4. forthcoming; imminent.

proximately or proximal — adv


That is so rude to place the definition of the word in such a condescending way. I even feel your tone is condescending and I don't even know you. Yes college educated people take the test, I agree with you on that point. I do agree about the comment of people coming from different backgrounds (A kid from the inner city vs one from suburbia). But, some people don't remember certain words nor used them as frequently as others. Hastened is a word that I may of heard of once or twice. I think what he is saying is the lsat should not use words that are NOT commonly used in conversations, no matter how rudimentary the word may be. Not saying "hastened" is a big word but, I don't walk around using big words at all in conversations. I think it is pretentious and unimpressive. "After I left from work, I hastened back to my house" PLEASE!



"I'm running through her purse like Frank Gore for the first"


Wow. And, I thought I was being helpful.




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