A LR question.

sarahpp99
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A LR question.

Postby sarahpp99 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 7:42 am

PT46 Section 3 24

The correct answer is A.

Why? I think the assumption is that anything that exists would stop existing if everyone stopped believing in it.
What does A mean?
Last edited by sarahpp99 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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DH87
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Re: A LR question.

Postby DH87 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:21 am

It means that anything that truly exists (existence being independent of our perception of it) would continue to exist even if we didn't believe in it. Money, according to the author, is the opposite. Meaning, it does not exist, therefore if we didn't believe in it, it would disappear.

sarahpp99
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Re: A LR question.

Postby sarahpp99 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:03 am

DH87 wrote:It means that anything that truly exists (existence being independent of our perception of it) would continue to exist even if we didn't believe in it. Money, according to the author, is the opposite. Meaning, it does not exist, therefore if we didn't believe in it, it would disappear.

Oh, I see.
Thank you.

sarahpp99
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Re: A LR question.

Postby sarahpp99 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:34 am

Sep 2007, Section 3, #16

The correct answer is C. Why? What does "tend to be treated for different illnesses" mean? Doesn't the argument say recovery rates at the two hospitals are similar for patients with similar illnesses?
Last edited by sarahpp99 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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elterrible78
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Re: A LR question.

Postby elterrible78 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:55 am

sarahpp99 wrote:Sep 2007, Section 3, #16

The correct answer is C. Why? What does "tend to be treated for different illnesses" mean? Doesn't the argument say recovery rates at the two hospitals are similar for patients with similar illnesses?


Why, it certainly does. But there is no reason to believe they only treat patients with similar illnesses. The average length of stay at University is 6 days...but University could, on average, treat far more difficult cases. Hope that makes sense.
Last edited by elterrible78 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

honeycomb
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Re: A LR question.

Postby honeycomb » Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:56 am

First of all, I'm pretty sure you can get in trouble for posting full LSAT questions on here so be careful.

As to the above question. Yes, they can treat similar illnesses at the same rate, but nowhere in the argument does it actually say that they see patients with similar illnesses. Maybe Edgewater Hospital is where everybody goes when they have a cold, while University Hospital is known for treating traumatic brain injuries. If that is the case, University Hospital could not decrease its average length of stay without affecting quality of care. That isn't to say that when University Hospital sees a patient who has a cold they can't treat it as quickly as Edgewater, we just don't know if they frequently see similar cases. For those reasons, C is correct.

sarahpp99
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Re: A LR question.

Postby sarahpp99 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:31 am

honeycomb wrote:First of all, I'm pretty sure you can get in trouble for posting full LSAT questions on here so be careful.

As to the above question. Yes, they can treat similar illnesses at the same rate, but nowhere in the argument does it actually say that they see patients with similar illnesses. Maybe Edgewater Hospital is where everybody goes when they have a cold, while University Hospital is known for treating traumatic brain injuries. If that is the case, University Hospital could not decrease its average length of stay without affecting quality of care. That isn't to say that when University Hospital sees a patient who has a cold they can't treat it as quickly as Edgewater, we just don't know if they frequently see similar cases. For those reasons, C is correct.


Oh, I figured it out. Thank you for your explanation.

And I don't know people can get in trouble for posting full questions on here. It's my first post of this sort. The hospital question really perplexed me for a long time.

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rinkrat19
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Re: A LR question.

Postby rinkrat19 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:33 am

sarahpp99 wrote:
honeycomb wrote:First of all, I'm pretty sure you can get in trouble for posting full LSAT questions on here so be careful.

As to the above question. Yes, they can treat similar illnesses at the same rate, but nowhere in the argument does it actually say that they see patients with similar illnesses. Maybe Edgewater Hospital is where everybody goes when they have a cold, while University Hospital is known for treating traumatic brain injuries. If that is the case, University Hospital could not decrease its average length of stay without affecting quality of care. That isn't to say that when University Hospital sees a patient who has a cold they can't treat it as quickly as Edgewater, we just don't know if they frequently see similar cases. For those reasons, C is correct.


Oh, I figured it out. Thank you for your explanation.

And I don't know people can get in trouble for posting full questions on here. It's my first post of this sort. The hospital question really perplexed me for a long time.
Yes, people can get in trouble for posting LSAT questions. You should delete it from your post and refer to it by test #/section/question

sarahpp99
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Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2010 3:52 pm

Re: A LR question.

Postby sarahpp99 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:37 am

rinkrat19 wrote:
sarahpp99 wrote:
honeycomb wrote:First of all, I'm pretty sure you can get in trouble for posting full LSAT questions on here so be careful.

As to the above question. Yes, they can treat similar illnesses at the same rate, but nowhere in the argument does it actually say that they see patients with similar illnesses. Maybe Edgewater Hospital is where everybody goes when they have a cold, while University Hospital is known for treating traumatic brain injuries. If that is the case, University Hospital could not decrease its average length of stay without affecting quality of care. That isn't to say that when University Hospital sees a patient who has a cold they can't treat it as quickly as Edgewater, we just don't know if they frequently see similar cases. For those reasons, C is correct.


Oh, I figured it out. Thank you for your explanation.

And I don't know people can get in trouble for posting full questions on here. It's my first post of this sort. The hospital question really perplexed me for a long time.
Yes, people can get in trouble for posting LSAT questions. You should delete it from your post and refer to it by test #/section/question

Deleted them already. Thanks for your tips.




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