games games games :@

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games games games :@

Postby armysgt » Fri Sep 28, 2012 10:59 am

I've been drilling and drilling games, but I just can't seem to get the difficult ones down..

I've never finished a game section with complete confidence (unless it was a repeat).

Drilling has enabled me to cut down time on the easier ones, and I often have 10~13 minutes for that toughest problem. Most often I just struggle through by elimination and plugging in elements as quickly as I can instead of finding those crucial inferences and run out of time.

For example, I just finished the game section PT 61 and wasn't able to finish the last game (1 left). With only 1 week to go, I just don't feel that I am at the level that I need to be with games... it baffles me that everyone says the games are the easiest :@... I just don't know what else I can do besides continuing to drill, and if that is going to help.

I am usually at around -0~-4 in LR, -0~-4 in RC. Games are all over the board - I either get it or don't get it. When I get them, I get around -0~-2, but there are those occasional -5 or more :(
(I get anomalies in other sections too, but games are far more unstable)

Games experts, just what can I do??

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Re: games games games :@

Postby defdef » Fri Sep 28, 2012 11:02 am

what method have you studied to attack them? how do you drill?

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Re: games games games :@

Postby eyescream » Fri Sep 28, 2012 11:09 am

When do you plan on taking the test? If this October, go with whatever you are most comfortable with. If later (or if you think you can adapt in the coming days), here's what I find works very well, at least for me:

Pre-game like mad. After reading the rules and transcribing them, try to write down different adaptations of the rules. Try to focus on rules that place variables in specific positions. For sequencing games, this can be rules like A > B > C on a game with five openings. B and A obviously won't be in the fifth spot, nor will B and C be in the first spot. Thus, they can only be in a specific amount of spots which may further be narrowed down by other rules.

One reason why I suggest doing this is because it's a quick way to familiarize yourself with the rules beyond reading and transcribing. Additionally, you may answer some of the questions at the very beginning.

Furthermore, it helps you to uncover some key deductions before you even begin.

Even though writing down adaptations may take up anywhere from a minute to two, I find that it saves me more time than going through each question individually and plugging and chugging. I also find the latter is easier if I have to do it, as I already have some adaptation of the rules plotted out and can remove wrong answer choices relative to those adaptations.

Anyway, this is what works pretty well for me. I found a lot of success in 40's and 50's tests, and it has still proven successful for me into the 60's.

Good luck.

EDIT: Just noticed you mentioned you'd be taking the test in the coming week (like me). Again, stick with what you're most comfortable with; however, if you think you can learn a new strategy between now and then, and be familiar with it on test day, go with whichever person's suggestion appeals most to you.

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Re: games games games :@

Postby toothbrush » Fri Sep 28, 2012 11:42 am


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