Extra time?

sr215
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:25 am

Extra time?

Postby sr215 » Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:32 am

I am asking to to see if it would behoove me to apply for extra time. I have a 3.75 GPA, great recommendations, and good work experience for a pre-law undergrad. However, I have a long history of abnormally low standardized test scores. I have had ADHD since I was 6, and never sought extra time in the past. However, during practice LSATs I find that I cannot finish on time, and when I re-do problems on my own, I get far more correct than I do during the actual test (obviously I have to guess on many when my time runs out) but I also get many more correct that I answered incorrectly during the test (subconscious test stress perhaps). I know my score would significantly increase with extra time, but is it worth getting my score flagged (I am applying to mainly t20 schools, and as of now my current scores do not suffice)? I would really appreciate any advice on this matter.

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Nova
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Re: Extra time?

Postby Nova » Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:50 am

sr215 wrote:I never sought extra time in the past.

That will hurt your petition.
sr215 wrote:However, I have a long history of abnormally low standardized test scores.

So do many test takers
However, during practice LSATs I find that I cannot finish on time, and when I re-do problems on my own, I get far more correct than I do during the actual test (obviously I have to guess on many when my time runs out) but I also get many more correct that I answered incorrectly during the test (subconscious test stress perhaps).

So do many test takers.
I know my score would significantly increase with extra time,

So would EVERYONE'S

RickyDnwhyc
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Re: Extra time?

Postby RickyDnwhyc » Mon Sep 10, 2012 11:02 am

sr215 wrote:I am asking to to see if it would behoove me to apply for extra time. I have a 3.75 GPA, great recommendations, and good work experience for a pre-law undergrad. However, I have a long history of abnormally low standardized test scores. I have had ADHD since I was 6, and never sought extra time in the past. However, during practice LSATs I find that I cannot finish on time, and when I re-do problems on my own, I get far more correct than I do during the actual test (obviously I have to guess on many when my time runs out) but I also get many more correct that I answered incorrectly during the test (subconscious test stress perhaps). I know my score would significantly increase with extra time, but is it worth getting my score flagged (I am applying to mainly t20 schools, and as of now my current scores do not suffice)? I would really appreciate any advice on this matter.


I don't see the harm in applying... Why not give it a shot and see what they offer you?

As for your score getting "flagged" I'm pretty sure it's illegal for Law Schools to discriminate based on disabilities/accomodated testing... Not sure if they still do.

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TopHatToad
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Re: Extra time?

Postby TopHatToad » Mon Sep 10, 2012 11:17 am

Having never sought test accommodations in the past will weigh heavily against you when LSAC reviews your petition. It's not impossible that they'll rule in your favor, but the thinking will be,
"Well if he was fine without extra time on the SAT, and his undergrad grades didn't suffer, why should we allow this now?"

This is one of those situations where any outcome is unfair to someone; just buckle down and work twice as hard in LSAT prep.

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Charlie.Home
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Re: Extra time?

Postby Charlie.Home » Mon Sep 10, 2012 12:46 pm

To me these seem like normal problems that everyone has on the LSAT

bp shinners
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Re: Extra time?

Postby bp shinners » Mon Sep 10, 2012 1:18 pm

RickyDnwhyc wrote:I don't see the harm in applying... Why not give it a shot and see what they offer you?

As for your score getting "flagged" I'm pretty sure it's illegal for Law Schools to discriminate based on disabilities/accomodated testing... Not sure if they still do.


They still flag. It's actually being challenged now by an ADA watchdog group, and the Justice Dept. just picked up the case to help out.

To OP - with what little I know of your background, you probably won't be given extra time. Never having applied for it before, and receiving a 3.75 undergrad GPA, will weigh heavily against you, as you managed to excel without the extra time.

Also, what you describe applies to almost everyone who studies for the LSAT - extra time always helps, and people usually notice their dumb mistakes when they go back and review.

Not saying anything in particular here; however, what I posted here is what I think will be the LSAC's argument, based on reading their briefs for a number of cases while researching this issue for an article.

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aw45
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Re: Extra time?

Postby aw45 » Mon Sep 10, 2012 6:34 pm

The only person I know that has been allowed extra time on the LSAT is registered with DARS and has been allowed extra time on every single standardized test taken in the past, and has legitimately needed it.

And even then, that person had to jump through hoops to be granted extra time.

sr215
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Re: Extra time?

Postby sr215 » Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:17 am

TopHatToad wrote:Having never sought test accommodations in the past will weigh heavily against you when LSAC reviews your petition. It's not impossible that they'll rule in your favor, but the thinking will be,
"Well if he was fine without extra time on the SAT, and his undergrad grades didn't suffer, why should we allow this now?"

This is one of those situations where any outcome is unfair to someone; just buckle down and work twice as hard in LSAT prep.

I did horribly on the SAT, even after intensive preparation. Would that factor in?

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Nova
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Re: Extra time?

Postby Nova » Wed Sep 12, 2012 10:26 am

sr215 wrote:
TopHatToad wrote:Having never sought test accommodations in the past will weigh heavily against you when LSAC reviews your petition. It's not impossible that they'll rule in your favor, but the thinking will be,
"Well if he was fine without extra time on the SAT, and his undergrad grades didn't suffer, why should we allow this now?"

This is one of those situations where any outcome is unfair to someone; just buckle down and work twice as hard in LSAT prep.

I did horribly on the SAT, even after intensive preparation. Would that factor in?


Go apply and see what happens.

piney
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 8:06 pm

Re: Extra time?

Postby piney » Wed Sep 12, 2012 11:18 am

It was my understanding that LSAC is very strict about their requirements for extra time. If you're legally blind or physically handicapped, you might have a shot, but LSAC doesn't normally give extra time for ADHD, even when it's been diagnosed by a medical health professional, and that doesn't seem to be the case here. The theory is that mdeications can be expected to level the playing field, even though that's not the case for people whose bodies won't tolerate ADHD medications.

Something else to consider. If the planets alligned and you were given extra time, you're LSAC report would include an asterisk next to your score. You might get a180, but every school will know you received extra time. This is different from the SATs, for example, where your school isn't flagged. I've also heard that flagged scores aren't factored into the schools admissions statistics, so your 180 isn't going to improve the schools ratings the same way a timed 170 might. Just something to consider.

bp shinners
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Re: Extra time?

Postby bp shinners » Wed Sep 12, 2012 12:07 pm

sr215 wrote:
TopHatToad wrote:Having never sought test accommodations in the past will weigh heavily against you when LSAC reviews your petition. It's not impossible that they'll rule in your favor, but the thinking will be,
"Well if he was fine without extra time on the SAT, and his undergrad grades didn't suffer, why should we allow this now?"

This is one of those situations where any outcome is unfair to someone; just buckle down and work twice as hard in LSAT prep.

I did horribly on the SAT, even after intensive preparation. Would that factor in?


There needs to be a counterpoint to a low SAT score in order for it to hold weight. So you'd need a very low SAT, but then excellent grades in a well-known, rigorous academic program to prove that the SAT wasn't a good indicator of your performance. If you just have a low SAT score, the LSAC will say you're simply a person with a low score.




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