Raising your score

andreasmommy
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Raising your score

Postby andreasmommy » Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:00 pm

Any advice on raising an LSAT score, it seems no amount of studying is raising my score.

What specific details to certain LR questions do I need to be able to recognize to become more efficient. Or any help with Reading comp would be amazing. Thank you!

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NoodleyOne
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Re: Raising your score

Postby NoodleyOne » Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:20 pm

Your post is really vague, so I'll just suggest getting guides (Manhattan LR/LG or Powerscore Bibles) and going through those, paired with questions grouped by type (I prefer Cambridge LSAT myself), and drilling individual types along with the book work. When you review PTs, review them thoroughly, and not just incorrect but also correct and difficult questions. The key to being a high scorer in my opinion is really *knowing* the test. The most you understand the questions and the logic behind them, the better off you'll be. Drilling and in depth review really assist with that.

nothblake
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Re: Raising your score

Postby nothblake » Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:07 am

The most consistent piece of advise around here is to take as many practice tests as possible.

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Nova
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Re: Raising your score

Postby Nova » Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:28 am

This should help, viewtopic.php?f=6&t=396

The Manhattan guides really helped me. You can bundle them for $70 on Amazon. Pattern recognition and repetition are key for LR/AR. Its all basically the same stuff recycled over and over with different variables. Build your foundation and then drill + PT + review like crazy

andreasmommy
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Re: Raising your score

Postby andreasmommy » Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:22 am

NoodleyOne wrote:Your post is really vague, so I'll just suggest getting guides (Manhattan LR/LG or Powerscore Bibles) and going through those, paired with questions grouped by type (I prefer Cambridge LSAT myself), and drilling individual types along with the book work. When you review PTs, review them thoroughly, and not just incorrect but also correct and difficult questions. The key to being a high scorer in my opinion is really *knowing* the test. The most you understand the questions and the logic behind them, the better off you'll be. Drilling and in depth review really assist with that.



Sorry, I didn't want to create a post with several paragraphs. I am having trouble with reading comp, I know while reading look for the thesis, the examples given in the passage are to support the thesis, look for past present language, language that indicate compare/contrast, any other tips to being able to answer the questions correctly, and efficiently?

Second, for logical reasoning: I understand how to identify every question type, however I have to read the passage 4 times until I am actually able to understand the passage, then I can attack. Which slows me down significantly. When I understand what the passage says then I know the nec. assump, inference, suff assum, and streng/weaken is all about asserting the nec. assum. According to logical reasoning bible, I should only read the passage once then attack my answer choices. How does a test taker get to that point?

andreasmommy
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Re: Raising your score

Postby andreasmommy » Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:32 am

nothblake wrote:The most consistent piece of advise around here is to take as many practice tests as possible.


I have taken over 30 practice tests (last 30 days), with same scores, still cannot seem to finish each section with confidence. Quality over quantity, I had to find out the hard way.

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NoodleyOne
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Re: Raising your score

Postby NoodleyOne » Mon Aug 20, 2012 7:08 am

Then yeah, sounds like my advice could help. I would read a little more slowly for comprehension instead of worrying so much about the clock. Some stims you'll have to go to multiple times, but on most questions that shouldn't be happening. You may consider reading the stem first so you know specifically what you're looking for. That's not my favorite approach, but many have used it with success, and if retention is a problem it may help. Also you might want to underline the conclusion the first time through a question (assuming it has one). This small thing could help you stay focused on the core of the argument, which could greatly benefit multiple question types.

For RC... ugh, tricky. If you've taken that many tests, you probably know the general type of questions the LSAT is going to throw at you. After you know the general question types, start reading with those in mind (note: I'm not suggesting go over the questions first, as that is counter-intuitive). I heard one good piece of advice for main point questions, which says the answer is going to have something that pertains to each paragraph, which helped me with that type. In general, I would just review the hell out of RC and see what you're getting wrong and why, and try to fix it. I don't think there is as "elegant" an approach to getting good at RC as there is at LR and LG, you're just going to have to work at it.

Also, if you haven't considered it, think about getting the Manhattan guides (especially the LR). I was a guy PTing in low 170s consistently, but wasn't consistent, but going through the LR guide has been an eye opener on a lot of things, and now I average right around -1 per section on LR with that hopefully improving further by test day.

unitball
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Re: Raising your score

Postby unitball » Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:27 am

nothblake wrote:The most consistent piece of advise around here is to take as many practice tests as possible.



one of the worst pieces of advice given on this forum without qualification....


do lots of practice tests, but after each practice section/test review the problems that you gotwrong or had difficulty with. Identify the error you made and try to never make the same error again. note the types of questions you tend to getwrong, then go study that specific question type. Taking lots of practice tests is nearly pointless if you're not correcting your errors along the way.

andreasmommy
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Re: Raising your score

Postby andreasmommy » Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:37 am

NoodleyOne wrote:Then yeah, sounds like my advice could help. I would read a little more slowly for comprehension instead of worrying so much about the clock. Some stims you'll have to go to multiple times, but on most questions that shouldn't be happening. You may consider reading the stem first so you know specifically what you're looking for. That's not my favorite approach, but many have used it with success, and if retention is a problem it may help. Also you might want to underline the conclusion the first time through a question (assuming it has one). This small thing could help you stay focused on the core of the argument, which could greatly benefit multiple question types.

For RC... ugh, tricky. If you've taken that many tests, you probably know the general type of questions the LSAT is going to throw at you. After you know the general question types, start reading with those in mind (note: I'm not suggesting go over the questions first, as that is counter-intuitive). I heard one good piece of advice for main point questions, which says the answer is going to have something that pertains to each paragraph, which helped me with that type. In general, I would just review the hell out of RC and see what you're getting wrong and why, and try to fix it. I don't think there is as "elegant" an approach to getting good at RC as there is at LR and LG, you're just going to have to work at it.

Also, if you haven't considered it, think about getting the Manhattan guides (especially the LR). I was a guy PTing in low 170s consistently, but wasn't consistent, but going through the LR guide has been an eye opener on a lot of things, and now I average right around -1 per section on LR with that hopefully improving further by test day.



Now, I will just sound dumb. I do read the passage slowly, and I always bracket the conclusion (when there is one). Even though I read slowly, I will have to reread several (4) times. And even though I bracket the conclusion I am still PTing low 160's. Which I am trying to raise to low 170s. Is there any indicator clues for you for what to look for in your answers with specific question types. Like for example, Flaw types, answer choices that have "presumes without providing justification that...(will put the necessary assumption here, if it is not the necessary assumption, it is wrong).

As for RC, I am quite familiar with the questions that will be asked but I noticed I get so focused on trying to read the passage and retain the information I get bogged down and the reading just goes over my head. When did you start reading passages, and not have the information just go straight over your head?

Thank you so much for all the helpful tips/advice. I will definitely be looking into the Manhattan LR and RC.

albanach
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Re: Raising your score

Postby albanach » Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:43 am

If RC is your trouble, are you trying to do all the passages within the time limit or did you start slow then speed up?

It's important that you work on accuracy before you work on speed. Particularly if a section is giving you trouble. Start untimed. Do the passage, then grade it. See what you got wrong and work out why.

Once you're getting good accuracy, start giving yourself an extra couple of minutes per passage and gradually bring it down until you can do a passage inside the available time.

There's an MCAT book http://www.amazon.com/Examkrackers-Pass ... b_title_bk of verbal reasoning passages. These are similar to LSAT RC passages.

It'd work through the MCAT book so you can boost accuracy and speed without wasting any more actual practice tests, especially if you've been using up recent tests.

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NoodleyOne
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Re: Raising your score

Postby NoodleyOne » Mon Aug 20, 2012 11:03 am

My major is one where I read a lot of journal articles and I read dense stuff pretty often so Rc was pretty natural for me.

bp shinners
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Re: Raising your score

Postby bp shinners » Mon Aug 20, 2012 11:56 am

andreasmommy wrote:
nothblake wrote:The most consistent piece of advise around here is to take as many practice tests as possible.


I have taken over 30 practice tests (last 30 days), with same scores, still cannot seem to finish each section with confidence. Quality over quantity, I had to find out the hard way.


Wait, you took one test/day over the past month? Wow. That's crazy and not very effective. That leaves you with almost no time to review your mistakes, which is the important part of taking a PT. And no, I'm not assuming anything here - if you were taking a test every day, you DID NOT have enough time to properly review your mistakes (unless you were scoring 165+).

Slow down, go back over some of your more recent tests, and spend as much time reviewing your mistakes, redoing questions, and finding out how to approach the problems as you did taking the tests to begin with. Also, pick up some guides that will teach you some methods - some people end up developing them as they take the tests/review, but some people learn a lot better having it laid out for them in a book.

andreasmommy
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Re: Raising your score

Postby andreasmommy » Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:02 pm

albanach wrote:If RC is your trouble, are you trying to do all the passages within the time limit or did you start slow then speed up?

It's important that you work on accuracy before you work on speed. Particularly if a section is giving you trouble. Start untimed. Do the passage, then grade it. See what you got wrong and work out why.

Once you're getting good accuracy, start giving yourself an extra couple of minutes per passage and gradually bring it down until you can do a passage inside the available time.

There's an MCAT book http://www.amazon.com/Examkrackers-Pass ... b_title_bk of verbal reasoning passages. These are similar to LSAT RC passages.

It'd work through the MCAT book so you can boost accuracy and speed without wasting any more actual practice tests, especially if you've been using up recent tests.



As sad as it sounds, I take my time during the reading and don't rush yet I am still making a lot of mistakes. I am actually slowing down on my RC sections. So I started timing myself to speed myself up, then that just caused me to read a passage and have no clue what I read, and pick answers but not feel confident they were correct.

andreasmommy
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Re: Raising your score

Postby andreasmommy » Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:06 pm

bp shinners wrote:
andreasmommy wrote:
nothblake wrote:The most consistent piece of advise around here is to take as many practice tests as possible.


I have taken over 30 practice tests (last 30 days), with same scores, still cannot seem to finish each section with confidence. Quality over quantity, I had to find out the hard way.


Wait, you took one test/day over the past month? Wow. That's crazy and not very effective. That leaves you with almost no time to review your mistakes, which is the important part of taking a PT. And no, I'm not assuming anything here - if you were taking a test every day, you DID NOT have enough time to properly review your mistakes (unless you were scoring 165+).

Slow down, go back over some of your more recent tests, and spend as much time reviewing your mistakes, redoing questions, and finding out how to approach the problems as you did taking the tests to begin with. Also, pick up some guides that will teach you some methods - some people end up developing them as they take the tests/review, but some people learn a lot better having it laid out for them in a book.



you are completely right. Thats what I said "quality over quantity." And after every practice test I went over the questions I got wrong and why I got them wrong..however there is no direct pattern to why I am still getting them wrong it is always different ones. One test I will get it right, next test I won't. I just cannot seem to grasp the passages. I read it twice and the words just shoot over my head. I am taking a course, and I have the LR bible, which confused me because my teacher has a different method. I understand how to identify question types and what each question type asks for (ex: inference "what can you prove"... ect.) But is there anything you recognized in certain question types that signaled you to your answer right away?

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312ldn
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Re: Raising your score

Postby 312ldn » Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:25 pm

andreasmommy wrote:
nothblake wrote:The most consistent piece of advise around here is to take as many practice tests as possible.


I have taken over 30 practice tests (last 30 days), with same scores, still cannot seem to finish each section with confidence. Quality over quantity, I had to find out the hard way.


I think you're falling into the same trap I was in last year. I know it's exasperating when you take test after test and you don't see any improvement. Then you decide to take another hoping to see some sort of score increase. I would suggest what most of TLS is going to suggest and that is to REVIEW your PTs. Make sure you understand why you consistently get certain questions wrong. Evaluate your weaknesses and your strengths and adjust your studying to address the problems you're having. I think that once you improve your accuracy, you can then work on your speed and those two combined should help you to see an increase in your scores. hth

albanach
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Re: Raising your score

Postby albanach » Mon Aug 20, 2012 3:05 pm

andreasmommy wrote:
As sad as it sounds, I take my time during the reading and don't rush yet I am still making a lot of mistakes. I am actually slowing down on my RC sections. So I started timing myself to speed myself up, then that just caused me to read a passage and have no clue what I read, and pick answers but not feel confident they were correct.


You need to treat each passage like it is valuable.

Start off un-timed. Take as long as you need to work through the passage and answer the questions. Then review. You need to understand _both_ why the ones you got wrong were incorrect and also why the ones you got right were correct.

Only once you're comfortable with that should you worry about timing.

bp shinners
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Re: Raising your score

Postby bp shinners » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:50 am

andreasmommy wrote: But is there anything you recognized in certain question types that signaled you to your answer right away?


I could write a whole book on this subject!

But the important thing to recognize is that there is a pattern to what you're getting wrong. If it's not the question type, then it's another feature of different question types that keeps tripping you up.

So when you review, make sure that you figure out not only why the right answer is right and the wrong answer is wrong, but also what made you think the wrong answer was right and the right answer was wrong. The LSAT uses the same tricks over and over to make the wrong answer enticing, and it uses the same tricks over and over to make the right answer look bad. The pattern in your incorrect answers is probably related to these tricks - you keep falling for the same ones, regardless of question type. Try to figure out what that is (are they messing with logical force? are they changing up the wording to something that means the same thing? are the using intentionally obtuse language that you don't understand?), and you'll be able to stop falling for those tricks.




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