Principle Q's are bs

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05062014
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Principle Q's are bs

Postby 05062014 » Fri Jul 27, 2012 7:46 pm

I now have a pretty clear idea what I am supposed to be doing for all LR questions except Principle questions in all of its forms. What I mean is, I know what type of answer I am supposed to be looking for for all Q's except principle Q's (especially ones requiring formal logic and/or the difficult ones in general).

For example: "which proposition/principle most conforms..." vs. "which principle is most similarly underlying the argument" vs. "which principle most justifies the conclusion"....For me, the justifies the conclusion variant of principle questions makes the most sense, but I still don't know what I am looking for. Is most conforms the same thing as justify the conclusion?

Are principle Q's more similar to Must be true or most strongly supported questions? Can you even relate principle Q's to either?

Maybe it is some of these old questions are different? I have not had problems on newer principle Q's. Any help would be much appreciating. Thank You.

tomwatts
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Re: Principle Q's are bs

Postby tomwatts » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:03 pm

Basically, Principle questions ask you to do one of three things.

"Which of the following principles, if established, most strongly supports the argument?"

Take this as a Strengthen question. The principle is supposed to support the argument. That means the argument has some sort of weakness initially. Presumably it assumes something about how the premises relate to the conclusion, and the principle will link the two (at least, usually). So if the premise is that Bob is an evil clown and the conclusion is that Susie shouldn't date Bob, then the principle is probably that Susie shouldn't date evil clowns. (Connect premise to conclusion.)

"Which of the following judgments conforms to the principle stated above?"

The principle in this question is already given to you. It's the stuff above the stem. It's almost always a conditional statement (or two). You're looking for a direct application of that conditional statement in the answers. So if the principle is that no one should date evil clowns, you're looking for an answer that says: Bob is an evil clown. Thus, Susie shouldn't date Bob. (Note also that these questions tend to be LOOOONG. Each answer choice is generally several sentences long, making the question large.)

"The argument most closely conforms to which one of the following principles?"

Now you're looking to pull out a generalization that describes what happened in the description above. This is sort of — but only sort of — like an Inference question, because you're matching an answer to the information that you were given. The difference is that you're not looking for the weakest, most definitely has to be true answer possible (the way you would on a "must be true" or "most strongly supported" Inference question). You're instead looking for a generalization that says that what happened above is what usually happens. So if the information above says, "Bob is an evil clown. After a long courtship, Susie decided not to be with Bob," you might find an answer that says, "Women are often tempted by — but do not end up with — evil clowns." It's a generalization that describes what happened in the situation you were given.

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05062014
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Re: Principle Q's are bs

Postby 05062014 » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:12 pm

tomwatts wrote:Basically, Principle questions ask you to do one of three things.

"Which of the following principles, if established, most strongly supports the argument?"

Take this as a Strengthen question. The principle is supposed to support the argument. That means the argument has some sort of weakness initially. Presumably it assumes something about how the premises relate to the conclusion, and the principle will link the two (at least, usually). So if the premise is that Bob is an evil clown and the conclusion is that Susie shouldn't date Bob, then the principle is probably that Susie shouldn't date evil clowns. (Connect premise to conclusion.)

"Which of the following judgments conforms to the principle stated above?"

The principle in this question is already given to you. It's the stuff above the stem. It's almost always a conditional statement (or two). You're looking for a direct application of that conditional statement in the answers. So if the principle is that no one should date evil clowns, you're looking for an answer that says: Bob is an evil clown. Thus, Susie shouldn't date Bob. (Note also that these questions tend to be LOOOONG. Each answer choice is generally several sentences long, making the question large.)

"The argument most closely conforms to which one of the following principles?"

Now you're looking to pull out a generalization that describes what happened in the description above. This is sort of — but only sort of — like an Inference question, because you're matching an answer to the information that you were given. The difference is that you're not looking for the weakest, most definitely has to be true answer possible (the way you would on a "must be true" or "most strongly supported" Inference question). You're instead looking for a generalization that says that what happened above is what usually happens. So if the information above says, "Bob is an evil clown. After a long courtship, Susie decided not to be with Bob," you might find an answer that says, "Women are often tempted by — but do not end up with — evil clowns." It's a generalization that describes what happened in the situation you were given.


1) This helped a lot, thank you.

2) For the which situation most conforms to the principle above -- do all of the conditionals in the stimulus need to be satisfied in the correct AC, or, does at least one of the conditionals need to be satisfied -- without contradicting any of the conditionals in the stimulus?

Mal Reynolds
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Re: Principle Q's are bs

Postby Mal Reynolds » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:16 pm

I never, ever miss principle questions. The trick is to always have a Plan B. Wait, you might have issues with that. You're screwed.

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05062014
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Re: Principle Q's are bs

Postby 05062014 » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:25 pm

Thanks

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PeanutsNJam
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Re: Principle Q's are bs

Postby PeanutsNJam » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:27 pm

My plan B is to be a spy and get mad honies.

tomwatts
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Re: Principle Q's are bs

Postby tomwatts » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:31 pm

abdistotle wrote:2) For the which situation most conforms to the principle above -- do all of the conditionals in the stimulus need to be satisfied in the correct AC, or, does at least one of the conditionals need to be satisfied -- without contradicting any of the conditionals in the stimulus?

Just one, without contradicting the others. (Usually. It depends on the exact phrasing. I can't recall off the top of my head needing both satisfied, but it may have happened — but either the stem or the conditionals would be worded strangely.)

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05062014
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Re: Principle Q's are bs

Postby 05062014 » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:39 pm

tomwatts wrote:
abdistotle wrote:2) For the which situation most conforms to the principle above -- do all of the conditionals in the stimulus need to be satisfied in the correct AC, or, does at least one of the conditionals need to be satisfied -- without contradicting any of the conditionals in the stimulus?

Just one, without contradicting the others. (Usually. It depends on the exact phrasing. I can't recall off the top of my head needing both satisfied, but it may have happened — but either the stem or the conditionals would be worded strangely.)


Alright, thanks. That makes more sense. You're right these stimuli are very long and annoying.




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