Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

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PeanutsNJam
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Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:57 pm

Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

Postby PeanutsNJam » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:08 pm

Hey all, I've been browsing the forums a lot as I prepare for the Oct 2012 LSAT (first time taker, rising senior undergrad student). I just have a question with something that I've been struggling with.

I've done 2 timed logic games sections and gotten -0 (I consistently got all the Kaplan LSAT 180 logic games questions all right after the first few also). I love knowing the answer, and being able to logically prove that the other ones are wrong.

However, as a person shooting for 180, I have to get every question right (or aim to).

Enter LR/RC-CR (comparative reading? supposed to be something new; scared by it).

I can no longer feel certain about all the questions and answer choices. I almost always reduce it down to two answer choices on the ones I'm not sure, and I'm getting upwards of -4 on these sections. What am I doing wrong? I know it's illegal to post questions, but I'll provide an example of two answer choices that got me stumped:

"professional drivers will drive within the legal speed limit if that limit is reduced"
"reducing the speed limit on major highways would cause some professional drivers to break the law"

I just couldn't differentiate between the two. It feels like in LR/RC-CR, it's more "best answer" and less of "absolutely correct answer" as found in logic games.

Also, if I take 20-30 prep tests between now and the test date, am I guaranteed to build up a solid endurance? I swear I have ADD and it gets hard to focus, especially when it's LR-CR-LR.

Thanks for taking the time to read and help out!
Last edited by PeanutsNJam on Tue Jul 10, 2012 3:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Oscar85
Posts: 71
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2012 2:53 pm

Re: Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

Postby Oscar85 » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:13 pm

PeanutsNJam wrote:Hey all, I've been browsing the forums a lot as I prepare for the Oct 2012 LSAT (first time taker, rising senior undergrad student). I just have a question with something that I've been struggling with.

I've done 2 timed logic games sections and gotten -0 (I consistently got all the Kaplan LSAT 180 logic games questions all right after the first few also). I love knowing the answer, and being able to logically prove that the other ones are wrong.

However, as a person shooting for 180, I have to get every question right (or aim to).

Enter LR/RC-CR (comparative reading? supposed to be something new; scared by it).

I can no longer feel certain about all the questions and answer choices. I almost always reduce it down to two answer choices on the ones I'm not sure, and I'm getting upwards of -4 on these sections. What am I doing wrong? I know it's illegal to post questions, but I'll provide an example of two answer choices that got me stumped (they're assumptions):

"professional drivers will drive within the legal speed limit if that limit is reduced"
"reducing the speed limit on major highways would cause some professional drivers to break the law"

I just couldn't differentiate between the two. It feels like in LR/RC-CR, it's more "best answer" and less of "absolutely correct answer" as found in logic games.

Also, if I take 20-30 prep tests between now and the test date, am I guaranteed to build up a sold endurance? I swear I have ADD and it gets hard to focus, especially when it's LR-CR-LR.

Thanks for taking the time to read and help out!

They're not the same. One is a causation statement and the other is a conditional statement. The first one is saying If A-->B (when A occurs, B occurs). The second statement is saying that A will definitely cause B. Causal statements, if they are a conclusion, are flawed. Causal premises are not flawed.

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PeanutsNJam
Posts: 3699
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:57 pm

Re: Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

Postby PeanutsNJam » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:15 pm

Oscar85 wrote:
PeanutsNJam wrote:Hey all, I've been browsing the forums a lot as I prepare for the Oct 2012 LSAT (first time taker, rising senior undergrad student). I just have a question with something that I've been struggling with.

I've done 2 timed logic games sections and gotten -0 (I consistently got all the Kaplan LSAT 180 logic games questions all right after the first few also). I love knowing the answer, and being able to logically prove that the other ones are wrong.

However, as a person shooting for 180, I have to get every question right (or aim to).

Enter LR/RC-CR (comparative reading? supposed to be something new; scared by it).

I can no longer feel certain about all the questions and answer choices. I almost always reduce it down to two answer choices on the ones I'm not sure, and I'm getting upwards of -4 on these sections. What am I doing wrong? I know it's illegal to post questions, but I'll provide an example of two answer choices that got me stumped (they're assumptions):

"professional drivers will drive within the legal speed limit if that limit is reduced"
"reducing the speed limit on major highways would cause some professional drivers to break the law"

I just couldn't differentiate between the two. It feels like in LR/RC-CR, it's more "best answer" and less of "absolutely correct answer" as found in logic games.

Also, if I take 20-30 prep tests between now and the test date, am I guaranteed to build up a sold endurance? I swear I have ADD and it gets hard to focus, especially when it's LR-CR-LR.

Thanks for taking the time to read and help out!

They're not the same. One is a causation statement and the other is a conditional statement. The first one is saying If A-->B (when A occurs, B occurs). The second statement is saying that A will definitely cause B. Causal statements, if they are a conclusion, are flawed. Causal premises are not flawed.


The second statement was the right one. I picked the first one. The question was: "The point at issue between the X and teh Y is whether:" I never seen that before to be honest, so I wasn't sure how to approach answering it.
Last edited by PeanutsNJam on Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:23 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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NoodleyOne
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Re: Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

Postby NoodleyOne » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:15 pm

I kind of view Logic Games as a break in the test, because they are actually pretty fun (nerd alert). RC and LR I kind of tackle the same way, and treat the RC as just a really long LR stimulus.

LR is... well, that's a tricky section. The test creators are very clever and many of those questions WILL trip you up. I tend to range anywhere from -0 to -4 on a single LR section (although thankfully those -4s are becoming more and more rare), but there are a ton of question types. My suggestion would be to get the Powergames LR Bible and/or the Manhattan LR guide, and combine that with the Cambridge LR bundle and Drill baby Drill. RC is a different beast, as I think people have the hardest time improving that (over LR and LG). You may want to grab the Manhattan RC guide and also drill like crazy, going over the answers you got wrong/had trouble with in detail.

If you haven't done any prep and are already getting -0s on LG sections, you're ahead of the game. But don't slack off on LG prep. I did that before the June test because I was rocking LG sections with ease, but that test through me a big curveball and I ended up with a -5 on that section. Keep drilling LG regularly, and target your weakpoints.

Also, for in depth analysis of particular questions, be they RC or LR or LG, Manhattan's website is an excellent source. And while you can't write a question in full detail here on TLS, you can give the test and question # and your general feelings about individual answer choices or why you got an answer wrong. And PT a lot, but also drill individual sections and be careful of burnout (it will happen).

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05062014
Posts: 437
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Re: Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

Postby 05062014 » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:20 pm

I would do more Reading comprehension passages. Burn through the older ones without remorse to get a feel for the RC section. The newer RC passages and questions are getting harder in general but I am finding the more passages I go through - "easy" ones or "hard" ones - the more I comfortable I get with the section in general. Also, I am finding that the RC section in particular accounts for time constraints on test takers. What I mean is, the section gets easier for me if I take it timed as opposed to untimed. Overthinking will kill you on LR and RC.

Keep in mind that you need to reform your "gut" studying by practicing untimed occasionally, but eventually you need to trust your training and pull the trigger in timed sections. You may find, like I did, that things are not so bad if you just trust your instincts, especially after studying for a while.

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PeanutsNJam
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Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:57 pm

Re: Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

Postby PeanutsNJam » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:21 pm

NoodleyOne wrote:I kind of view Logic Games as a break in the test, because they are actually pretty fun (nerd alert). RC and LR I kind of tackle the same way, and treat the RC as just a really long LR stimulus.

LR is... well, that's a tricky section. The test creators are very clever and many of those questions WILL trip you up. I tend to range anywhere from -0 to -4 on a single LR section (although thankfully those -4s are becoming more and more rare), but there are a ton of question types. My suggestion would be to get the Powergames LR Bible and/or the Manhattan LR guide, and combine that with the Cambridge LR bundle and Drill baby Drill. RC is a different beast, as I think people have the hardest time improving that (over LR and LG). You may want to grab the Manhattan RC guide and also drill like crazy, going over the answers you got wrong/had trouble with in detail.

If you haven't done any prep and are already getting -0s on LG sections, you're ahead of the game. But don't slack off on LG prep. I did that before the June test because I was rocking LG sections with ease, but that test through me a big curveball and I ended up with a -5 on that section. Keep drilling LG regularly, and target your weakpoints.

Also, for in depth analysis of particular questions, be they RC or LR or LG, Manhattan's website is an excellent source. And while you can't write a question in full detail here on TLS, you can give the test and question # and your general feelings about individual answer choices or why you got an answer wrong. And PT a lot, but also drill individual sections and be careful of burnout (it will happen).


Thanks! I did go through all of the Kaplan 180 book so I'm not doing this without any prep. I actually gave up halfway through the Kaplan critical reading section because it was so full of typos... one passage consistently said "crystal" instead of "crustal." Had me punching electric fences. I'm ordering the powergames bible. Thanks for the help, and it's nice knowing I'm not the only one who struggles with reading long passages.

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cc.celina
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Re: Mindset shift for LR/RC-CR?

Postby cc.celina » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:53 pm

PeanutsNJam wrote:The second statement was the right one. I picked the first one. The question was: "The point at issue between the X and teh Y is whether:" I never seen that before to be honest, so I wasn't sure how to approach answering it.

If you'd never seen a point at issue question before, this is probably more of a familiarity issue than anything else. Learning strategy from prep books will definitely help, but so will sheer repetition.

You are correct: there is often no absolutely provably correct answer choice in LR or RC. (there are some exceptions - assumptions, parallel reasoning, etc that are easy to affirmatively prove, but there are many others, such as main point, strengthen/weaken, etc that you may find less straightforward.) The correct AC will sometimes match your prephrase exactly and sometimes be completely unrelated to what you thought the answer would be. But there are ALWAYS four provably incorrect answer choices. There is not a single uncredited response that could be the answer. When you're stuck between two at the end, focus on finding a reason one of them is wrong.

And ditto what noodles said about LG prep. I did really well on older LG because I'm good at inferences, and then about a week before the test I did some newer sections and I was completely rammed by the massive amount of hypos I had to draw out. During PTs in the 20s, 30s and mostly 40s I could finish the section with like 8+ min left, but I barely finished on time on test day.




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