When does LSAT prep get easier?

ar1656
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 5:58 pm

When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby ar1656 » Sat Jun 09, 2012 6:04 pm

I'm in need of a little moral support. I started my LSAT prep about two weeks ago with Kaplan and so far, I've only improved a small amount on each section. I'm taking the LSAT in October (which I know leaves plenty of time for improvement). I'm frightened that it's not going to get easier and I'm not going to make a large leap from my 150 "Diagnostic Score."

How did you prep?
How can I focus less on the score and more on improvement?
How much should I be studying everyday in order to be prepared four months from now?
Did any of you start with a low score and end up with a high one?

User avatar
Mr.Binks
Posts: 574
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:49 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby Mr.Binks » Sat Jun 09, 2012 6:27 pm

First off, the general consensus is that Kaplan is a pretty shitty prep company and is generally not intended for the top scorers. I found a lot of their methods were very inefficient, though I'm sure there are some things they do well also.

My prep materials consisted of Powerscore LG and LR Bibles, Manhattan for RC, and then used Velocity to give me the extra bump. While I saw significant improvement through self-studying and using those books, I preferred Velocity's methods the most. They were the most intuitive, in my opinion.

Four months is plenty of time to boost your score significant, especially if you devote enough time and effort into it. The key, though, isn't really how much time you spend studying, but how you study. It's important that you have a firm grasp on the fundamentals of how to approach each question/game type so that you're consistent. When you learn more about the questions, you'll start seeing increases in your scores.

User avatar
Micdiddy
Posts: 2190
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 3:38 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby Micdiddy » Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:00 pm

Kaplan sucks, withdraw now and get as much money back as you can.

I self studied with books and pt's, and it gets easier once you are used to the test and each section and then just have to fill in your certain flaws. After you know each LR question type you can drill the ones you are worst at. After you know every LG set-up you can figure out most games and work on speed. etc. etc. Once you've had enough experience with it, you won't feel lost among all the questions and conditionals and answer choices.

It'll still be hard after that, and for most people there are things they struggle with up to test day, but it'll at least be easier.

ar1656
Posts: 27
Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2012 5:58 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby ar1656 » Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:31 pm

Should I just start taking pt's and completely ignore what Kaplan says?

User avatar
dowu
Posts: 8334
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 9:47 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby dowu » Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:33 pm

:shock: :shock:
Last edited by dowu on Mon Apr 18, 2016 10:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Micdiddy
Posts: 2190
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 3:38 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby Micdiddy » Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:36 pm

ar1656 wrote:Should I just start taking pt's and completely ignore what Kaplan says?


Yes-ish and no.

You do not have to "completely ignore what Kaplan says." I am sure, by virtue of their being able to state the obvious, some of what they have told you is correct. But generally they're considered rather poor because their instructors don't need great scores to teach, and often don't know the answer to more difficult questions. They can still teach you the different types of question in LR, but so can the Powerscore Bible for much cheaper. So whereas Kaplan sucks, it sucks compared to all other test prep companies and definitely sucks compared to the money spent, but if you can't get a refund might as well go and listen and take what's handed to you, just be ready to do a LOT LOT LOT more on top of that.

Get the Powerscore bible in LR and LG, get prob the Manhattan guide to RC and get PT's and start figuring out where you're at what your weaknesses are. Make a study plan, stick to it, and TLS like a crazy person.

User avatar
TheThriller
Posts: 2285
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 10:12 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby TheThriller » Sat Jun 09, 2012 7:59 pm

Greg Lemond on his training: "It doesn't get easier, you just go faster"

In otherwords, it doesn't get easier, you just get better.

User avatar
flippacious
Posts: 78
Joined: Fri May 11, 2012 3:54 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby flippacious » Sat Jun 09, 2012 8:14 pm

Micdiddy wrote:
ar1656 wrote:Should I just start taking pt's and completely ignore what Kaplan says?


Yes-ish and no.

You do not have to "completely ignore what Kaplan says." I am sure, by virtue of their being able to state the obvious, some of what they have told you is correct. But generally they're considered rather poor because their instructors don't need great scores to teach, and often don't know the answer to more difficult questions. They can still teach you the different types of question in LR, but so can the Powerscore Bible for much cheaper. So whereas Kaplan sucks, it sucks compared to all other test prep companies and definitely sucks compared to the money spent, but if you can't get a refund might as well go and listen and take what's handed to you, just be ready to do a LOT LOT LOT more on top of that.

Get the Powerscore bible in LR and LG, get prob the Manhattan guide to RC and get PT's and start figuring out where you're at what your weaknesses are. Make a study plan, stick to it, and TLS like a crazy person.


Agreed. Kaplan is not going to give you misinformation, they are just not going to address the more difficult concepts that you need to master in order to get a top score.

I signed up for a Kaplan course when I was in undergrad before I realized that it wasn't the best idea. Kaplan was pretty stubborn about not giving me a refund, so I went ahead and took the course. I read the PS Bibles before my course started, then did three months of the Kaplan course, and I'm now rereading the PS Bibles and doing self-study. Anyway, if Kaplan won't give you your money back, don't panic! Here's what I would do: attend the classes (and especially the proctored tests), but use the course as more of a (very expensive) study guide. Don't bother with most of their "homework" videos. I work full time so I need to manage my study time wisely, and my biggest frustration was wasting so much time on the damn videos. Instead of watching all of them, follow along in the PS Bibles and/or Manhattan books. For example, for the week that your Kaplan class focuses on Assumption questions, read the Assumption chapter in Powerscore LRB and drill that question type. Basically, Kaplan is a decent introduction to most things on the LSAT, but since they are not aimed at top scorers they over simplify everything. Use them as an introduction and then use other materials to approach the more complex aspects of every question type. If you supplement Kaplan with other material (and take way more Preptests than they suggest), it could end up being helpful.

I recognize everyone has different needs when it comes to LSAT study, but in retrospect this is what I wish I had done with my Kaplan class. Hope this helps!

User avatar
Br3v
Posts: 4174
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 7:18 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby Br3v » Sat Jun 09, 2012 8:14 pm

It doesn't get easier, you just get better

User avatar
Micdiddy
Posts: 2190
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 3:38 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby Micdiddy » Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:38 am

flippacious wrote:
Micdiddy wrote:
ar1656 wrote:Should I just start taking pt's and completely ignore what Kaplan says?


Yes-ish and no.

You do not have to "completely ignore what Kaplan says." I am sure, by virtue of their being able to state the obvious, some of what they have told you is correct. But generally they're considered rather poor because their instructors don't need great scores to teach, and often don't know the answer to more difficult questions. They can still teach you the different types of question in LR, but so can the Powerscore Bible for much cheaper. So whereas Kaplan sucks, it sucks compared to all other test prep companies and definitely sucks compared to the money spent, but if you can't get a refund might as well go and listen and take what's handed to you, just be ready to do a LOT LOT LOT more on top of that.

Get the Powerscore bible in LR and LG, get prob the Manhattan guide to RC and get PT's and start figuring out where you're at what your weaknesses are. Make a study plan, stick to it, and TLS like a crazy person.


Agreed. Kaplan is not going to give you misinformation, they are just not going to address the more difficult concepts that you need to master in order to get a top score.

I signed up for a Kaplan course when I was in undergrad before I realized that it wasn't the best idea. Kaplan was pretty stubborn about not giving me a refund, so I went ahead and took the course. I read the PS Bibles before my course started, then did three months of the Kaplan course, and I'm now rereading the PS Bibles and doing self-study. Anyway, if Kaplan won't give you your money back, don't panic! Here's what I would do: attend the classes (and especially the proctored tests), but use the course as more of a (very expensive) study guide. Don't bother with most of their "homework" videos. I work full time so I need to manage my study time wisely, and my biggest frustration was wasting so much time on the damn videos. Instead of watching all of them, follow along in the PS Bibles and/or Manhattan books. For example, for the week that your Kaplan class focuses on Assumption questions, read the Assumption chapter in Powerscore LRB and drill that question type. Basically, Kaplan is a decent introduction to most things on the LSAT, but since they are not aimed at top scorers they over simplify everything. Use them as an introduction and then use other materials to approach the more complex aspects of every question type. If you supplement Kaplan with other material (and take way more Preptests than they suggest), it could end up being helpful.

I recognize everyone has different needs when it comes to LSAT study, but in retrospect this is what I wish I had done with my Kaplan class. Hope this helps!


This is awesome advice. Where have you been with just those 4 measly posts? Keep it up!

bp shinners
Posts: 3091
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 7:05 pm

Re: When does LSAT prep get easier?

Postby bp shinners » Sun Jun 10, 2012 12:54 pm

ar1656 wrote:I started my LSAT prep about two weeks ago with Kaplan and so far, I've only improved a small amount on each section.


Improving a small amount on each section over a 2 week period is exactly what you should expect to see. The LSAT isn't a test where you go up by leaps and bounds - you get a little better here, a little better there, and all those 1-2 point gains add up over the course of weeks and months to give you the score you want. Give it time - it sounds like you're heading in the right direction.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Alexandros, cherrygalore, dj9i27, Instrumental, TAD and 6 guests