Drilling vs. Full PTs

PurpleMustang
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 8:53 pm

Drilling vs. Full PTs

Postby PurpleMustang » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:09 pm

How would you recommend studying? What's most effective?

I have:

- all of the 10 Actual, 10 More Actual, The Next 10 Actual, and 10 New Actual
- SuperPrep
- PT 62-64 individually
- Powerscore LG and LR Bibles
- Manhattan RC Guide

1) I'm looking to get PT 39-51 because they aren't in a book form. I have to buy these individually, right?
2) PT 1-6, 8, and 17 are also not included in a book form. Are these worth getting?
3) Would you recommend that I purchase any books like "LR by type" or should I just stick to full PTs?


*If you have any prep book recommendations aside from my current list, I'd appreciate it!

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dowu
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Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 9:47 pm

Re: Drilling vs. Full PTs

Postby dowu » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:15 pm

I'd say start with the bibles first, in which the order does not matter.

Then, read superprep (every word in it) and do the corresponding tests within.

From there, I would see if I have any weaknesses and find bundles of questions that I have trouble with to drill those.

Then, PT and REVIEW. Reviewing is crucial.

When you miss a question, ask yourself (creating a log of these questions/answers is helpful):

1) What is this question asking from me?
2) Why did I choose the wrong answer?
3) What about the right answer made me think it was wrong?
4) What makes the other 4 answer choices wrong?
5) What makes the answer choice right?
6) What does this answer do for the question/argument?

Good luck!

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Tiago Splitter
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Re: Drilling vs. Full PTs

Postby Tiago Splitter » Thu Apr 12, 2012 6:55 pm

You really don't need to do more than 10-15 full length tests. Figure out where your weak points are as you go along, and then drill those weak points like crazy.

In total I did about 12 PTs but saw at least 75% of the total released questions. Taking PTs early just wastes questions and will probably lead to you spinning your wheels.

PurpleMustang
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 8:53 pm

Re: Drilling vs. Full PTs

Postby PurpleMustang » Thu Apr 12, 2012 6:59 pm

Tiago Splitter wrote:You really don't need to do more than 10-15 full length tests. Figure out where your weak points are as you go along, and then drill those weak points like crazy.

In total I did about 12 PTs but saw at least 75% of the total released questions. Taking PTs early just wastes questions and will probably lead to you spinning your wheels.


If you saw 75% of the total released questions, how did you not waste PTs/questions? Did you do them untimed? Or did you get a book of Grouped Questions?

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Tiago Splitter
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Re: Drilling vs. Full PTs

Postby Tiago Splitter » Thu Apr 12, 2012 7:09 pm

PurpleMustang wrote:
Tiago Splitter wrote:You really don't need to do more than 10-15 full length tests. Figure out where your weak points are as you go along, and then drill those weak points like crazy.

In total I did about 12 PTs but saw at least 75% of the total released questions. Taking PTs early just wastes questions and will probably lead to you spinning your wheels.


If you saw 75% of the total released questions, how did you not waste PTs/questions? Did you do them untimed? Or did you get a book of Grouped Questions?


I went through a Testmasters class, where the questions are grouped by type. This made drilling very easy, especially toward the end when I had already gone through the class lessons and had a firm grasp of the material. For example if I missed a weakening question on a PT, I'd go back and do 10-15 weaken questions that I hadn't seen before. All of the PTs they give were made up of questions that were no where else in the training material, so I never had to worry about repeating questions.

As to your timing question, I wouldn't worry about timing until you've proven an ability to get most of the questions right in an untimed setting. Trying to time yourself when you are doing, say, 20 straight strengthen LR questions isn't that helpful anyways because you'll never actually see that on a real test. As you do more drilling you'll start to develop an internal clock and realize how quickly you need to go on the real test. And as your understanding of the test improves you'll naturally go faster and faster. You can always keep a stopwatch close by as you practice to see how long things take, but don't get too caught up in timing early on.

Once you have learned the question types and developed the ability to answer most questions accurately, start taking PTs with questions you haven't seen before in order to learn pacing.




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