For those of you using Manhattan LR Book - Question

dkb17xzx
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Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:25 pm

For those of you using Manhattan LR Book - Question

Postby dkb17xzx » Mon Apr 09, 2012 2:06 pm

Pg 449:

What does this statement mean in plain English:

"At least some voters who prefer Candidate B do not share at least one common concern with at least one voter who prefers Candidate A"

My understanding: At least some voters who prefer Candidate B do not share even one common concern with even one voter who prefers Candidate A" - that's the only I think it makes sense for it to be non-inferable.


And, and if my understanding is correct, can we use 'at least' and 'even' interchangeably?

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LexLeon
Posts: 400
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Re: For those of you using Manhattan LR Book - Question

Postby LexLeon » Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:06 pm

The way I'd read it is:

There is at least one voter who prefers B that shares no concerns with at least one voter than prefers A.

And this is consistent with all other voters who prefer B sharing concerns with all other voters that prefer A.

I'm not sure if the word "even" entails the concept of "at minimum", so I'd be careful in interchanging them. It sounds kind of awkward at times when one does, as well.

Disclaimer: It's possible that I'm entirely incorrect.

Manhattan LSAT Noah
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Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 8:43 am

Re: For those of you using Manhattan LR Book - Question

Postby Manhattan LSAT Noah » Mon Apr 09, 2012 11:51 pm

dkb17xzx wrote:Pg 449:

What does this statement mean in plain English:

"At least some voters who prefer Candidate B do not share at least one common concern with at least one voter who prefers Candidate A"

My understanding: At least some voters who prefer Candidate B do not share even one common concern with even one voter who prefers Candidate A" - that's the only I think it makes sense for it to be non-inferable.


And, and if my understanding is correct, can we use 'at least' and 'even' interchangeably?

It's quite a brain-twister there. But you got it. I think you can summarize it even more: there are some B people that don't share any concerns with candidate A people. And, that might be true, but it could be that all the B people care about school budgeting (the stimulus is about what's the most important issue, and this answer is more broadly about a concern).

I hope that helps.

As for "at least" and "even", in this context it works. Off the top of my head, "even" is used for quantification only in the sense of "not even" some amount. So, not at least one. Sort of strange, but equivalent. From the clarity of your question, it seems like something you don't have to worry about.




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