Question

Rickjames11
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 12:29 pm

Question

Postby Rickjames11 » Fri Feb 10, 2012 7:00 am

I have been studying for the June LSAT since September. I have gone through several problems from the Kaplan books I recieved when I took the Kaplan Extreme course a year ago.

Also, I finished Powerscore bible: LG, yesterday. Now I am going through Powerscore bible: LR. After, I am going to go through PSB: RC and retake the Kaplan course.

Does going through the PSB's now make sense when I am 4 months from retaking?

I thought it wise to use the ample time and go to back to basics.

Once finished with the PSB's, drill-drill-drill from the Kaplan books. Then take the Kaplan course, which will be rudimentary/redundant, however I would be more looking to maximize the one-on-one tutoring time, of which I will have a few private sessions. I have already started to mark the most troublesome problems for those sessions.

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Scotusnerd
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Re: Question

Postby Scotusnerd » Fri Feb 10, 2012 10:39 am

There's too many unanswered questions for me to give you good advice.

What are you currently PTing at? Where are your trouble areas? What's your goal score? Are you taking timed tests yet?

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Mr.Binks
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Re: Question

Postby Mr.Binks » Fri Feb 10, 2012 3:41 pm

Scotusnerd wrote:There's too many unanswered questions for me to give you good advice.

What are you currently PTing at? Where are your trouble areas? What's your goal score? Are you taking timed tests yet?


All of this is true. And if you've been prepping for so long and have gone through the necessary materials (LGB, LRB, Manhattan RC, etc), then I think you would find it a huge waste of your time to take a Kaplan course. They will not tell you anything you don't already know. The key is to drill and take a lot of PTs in order to identify your weaknesses and be able to work on those.

A private tutor is probably much more useful if you are still having troubles with certain areas after PTing and going through the said materials.

Rickjames11
Posts: 38
Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 12:29 pm

Re: Question

Postby Rickjames11 » Fri Feb 10, 2012 6:26 pm

I haven't really started to PT yet.

Doesn't this flow make sense? PSB->Drill->PT?

I can understand that the Kaplan course would be a waste of time. Is it really worth not taking again? I feel it could be useful. But I do feel like I am at a higher level. Not based off PT scores, but just from doing sections and missing a few only.

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bdeebs
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Re: Question

Postby bdeebs » Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:32 pm

I personally feel like doing the entire PSB-->Drill is an inefficient use of time. This is how I did the first stage of my prep, and now I find myself rereading the bibles to pick out the finer points because I'm testing at a range that varies +/-5 points which is pretty huge, and it's also a little lower than I'd like it. You could skip this stage since I'm assuming you already know the basics, and just go straight into drilling and identifying techniques you like for each particular problem type. So I would just pick a particular question type, read the corresponding section in PSB for more detailed tips/tricks (if that is the way you're going), and then drill/review that particular section.

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Scotusnerd
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Re: Question

Postby Scotusnerd » Sat Feb 11, 2012 1:57 am

You need to start taking untimed tests now instead of putzing around with drills. If what you're saying is true, you've spent September, October, November, December, January and part of February working on drills. That is more than enough time. You have four months to work on the really important stuff.

Put that drill crap aside for now and start working on your mental endurance and ability to take an entire test. You'll have an accurate picture of what needs to be drilled and how much you need to work on what after you've taken a full PT or two.

Work your way up to full timed exams. It should take you about a month to get fully comfortable, I suspect. Doing an entire exam in one sitting is hard.

That way, you can spend the next three months working and improving your scores using the knowledge you've hopefully gained from measuring your progress.

A side note: You haven't encountered what makes this test truly hard yet...timing and endurance. That's what you need to focus on now. Most of us could probably score a 165+ if they studied for a month or two and had no time limit. But we have a strict 35-minute time limit, and that's where the difficulty is.




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