I called LSAC about accommodated scores

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:18 am

suspicious android wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:That was the main reason I needed my extra time in one class last semester. If I could have typed it I could have finished almost on time.


So you don't generally need extra time for your college classes, and it sounds like you don't need extra time for the LSAT either, since you already showed you can outscore the majority of testtakers. Good job, sounds like things are working out for you.


I do need extra time on exams, maybe about half of the time (it varies from one semester to another and I'm just speaking about fall 2011). Most of that need is due to slow processing speed but a significant obstacle can also be my handwriting problems if an exam requires a lot of writing.

emkay625 wrote:I'm also shocked about this special-education high school you went to. That's a blatant violation of IDEA as it is by far the MOST restrictive environment, and for schools to be in compliance with federal regulations, students are required to be placed in the least-restrictive educational environment. Would you mind elaborating a bit more on that situation? (This is not a gotcha kind of question - as a teacher with a dual sped/math 8 - 12 certification i really am curious and also a little horrified that your school district did this).


What are you talking about?! Please explain further. My school was not too restrictive!
Last edited by Philosopher King on Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

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topper10s
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby topper10s » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:18 am

Has anyone ever read "A Confederacy of Dunces"?

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birdlaw117
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby birdlaw117 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:19 am

Philosopher King wrote:
birdlaw117 wrote:Actually, I retract my previous comment. Diagramming games can be writing-intensive, so I can see why that would be necessary. But this seems to be a physical issue rather than due to your slow processing speed, no? I just feel like you're changing your story a little bit as more questions are asked.


No I'm not changing my story but something was mentioned that caused me to explain my problem with handwriting. My slow processing speed can seem worse than it really is with a writing intensive exam that I can't use a computer for. That has little, if anything, to do with the LSAT. For law school final exams this would be a factor. I probably wouldn't need time-and-half if I could use a computer BUT I would still need SOME extra time. Also, my arthritis pain still affects typing after a real lot of typing.

Wouldn't slow processing speed no be a limiting factor if it's a non-issue when you're going faster (typing) it's not an issue but it supposedly is when you're going slower (writing). That seems more like a working memory issue than a processing speed issue (I'm no psychologist, so I could be wrong here). That just seems inconsistent to me.

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:22 am

birdlaw117 wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:
birdlaw117 wrote:Actually, I retract my previous comment. Diagramming games can be writing-intensive, so I can see why that would be necessary. But this seems to be a physical issue rather than due to your slow processing speed, no? I just feel like you're changing your story a little bit as more questions are asked.


No I'm not changing my story but something was mentioned that caused me to explain my problem with handwriting. My slow processing speed can seem worse than it really is with a writing intensive exam that I can't use a computer for. That has little, if anything, to do with the LSAT. For law school final exams this would be a factor. I probably wouldn't need time-and-half if I could use a computer BUT I would still need SOME extra time. Also, my arthritis pain still affects typing after a real lot of typing.

Wouldn't slow processing speed no be a limiting factor if it's a non-issue when you're going faster (typing) it's not an issue but it supposedly is when you're going slower (writing). That seems more like a working memory issue than a processing speed issue (I'm no psychologist, so I could be wrong here). That just seems inconsistent to me.


There's two problems: slow processing speed and trouble handwriting. So a computer will solve one part but not the other. I do have bad working memory too. I'm insanely forgetful. and oftentimes use scrap paper during exams to write stuff down because if I think of something I need to know I will instantly forget many times.

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emkay625
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby emkay625 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:23 am

Philosopher King wrote:
suspicious android wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:That was the main reason I needed my extra time in one class last semester. If I could have typed it I could have finished almost on time.


So you don't generally need extra time for your college classes, and it sounds like you don't need extra time for the LSAT either, since you already showed you can outscore the majority of testtakers. Good job, sounds like things are working out for you.


I do need extra time on exams, maybe about half of the time (it varies from one semester to another and I'm just speaking about fall 2011). Most of that need is due to slow processing speed but a significant obstacle can also be my handwriting problems if an exam requires a lot of writing.

emkay625 wrote:I'm also shocked about this special-education high school you went to. That's a blatant violation of IDEA as it is by far the MOST restrictive environment, and for schools to be in compliance with federal regulations, students are required to be placed in the least-restrictive educational environment. Would you mind elaborating a bit more on that situation? (This is not a gotcha kind of question - as a teacher with a dual sped/math 8 - 12 certification i really am curious and also a little horrified that your school district did this).


What are you talking about?! Please explain further. My school was not too restrictive!


Under IDEA, schools are required to place special-education students in the least-restrictive educational setting. Restrictive in this case does not mean teachers are mean, etc. Restrictive, in terms of special-education history and policy, means segregated from general education students. Putting all of your special education students at one high school is HIGHLY illegal. You can only do that for students with incredibly severe disabilities - such as mentally retarded students or students who would somehow endanger other students, Also blind or deaf students may be placed in a separate school. Students who can function in a gen ed classroom are required by law to be placed in one and given accommodations to help them succeed. See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Rest ... nvironment

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:28 am

emkay625 wrote:Under IDEA, schools are required to place special-education students in the least-restrictive educational setting. Restrictive in this case does not mean teachers are mean, etc. Restrictive, in terms of special-education history and policy, means segregated from general education students. Putting all of your special education students at one high school is HIGHLY illegal. See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Rest ... nvironment


What?! Special ed schools are illegal? That doesn't make any sense. Trust me, I'm glad I didn't have to go to my public high school because the school district we are in isn't good. They paid the tuition and transportation for the school I went to. From what I've hear, this is pretty common and oftentimes school districts resist doing this and instead insist special ed students attend the public schools.

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emkay625
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby emkay625 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:32 am

Philosopher King wrote:
emkay625 wrote:Under IDEA, schools are required to place special-education students in the least-restrictive educational setting. Restrictive in this case does not mean teachers are mean, etc. Restrictive, in terms of special-education history and policy, means segregated from general education students. Putting all of your special education students at one high school is HIGHLY illegal. See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Rest ... nvironment


What?! Special ed schools are illegal? That doesn't make any sense. Trust me, I'm glad I didn't have to go to my public high school because the school district we are in isn't good. They paid the tuition and transportation for the school I went to. From what I've hear, this is pretty common and oftentimes school districts resist doing this and instead insist special ed students attend the public schools.


It is an attempt to combat years of segregation and unequal education. (For decades, all special-education students were sent to separate schools were no one actually taught them/assumed they could succeed).

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emkay625
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby emkay625 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:35 am

Philosopher King wrote:
emkay625 wrote:Under IDEA, schools are required to place special-education students in the least-restrictive educational setting. Restrictive in this case does not mean teachers are mean, etc. Restrictive, in terms of special-education history and policy, means segregated from general education students. Putting all of your special education students at one high school is HIGHLY illegal. See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Rest ... nvironment


What?! Special ed schools are illegal? That doesn't make any sense. Trust me, I'm glad I didn't have to go to my public high school because the school district we are in isn't good. They paid the tuition and transportation for the school I went to. From what I've hear, this is pretty common and oftentimes school districts resist doing this and instead insist special ed students attend the public schools.


This would only make sense in a situation where the student is unable to succeed in a general education environment. For example, a school will often pay for a deaf or blind student to attend a special school, since there's no way all of the teachers at the regular school would know sign language.

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:35 am

emkay625 wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:
emkay625 wrote:Under IDEA, schools are required to place special-education students in the least-restrictive educational setting. Restrictive in this case does not mean teachers are mean, etc. Restrictive, in terms of special-education history and policy, means segregated from general education students. Putting all of your special education students at one high school is HIGHLY illegal. See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Rest ... nvironment


What?! Special ed schools are illegal? That doesn't make any sense. Trust me, I'm glad I didn't have to go to my public high school because the school district we are in isn't good. They paid the tuition and transportation for the school I went to. From what I've hear, this is pretty common and oftentimes school districts resist doing this and instead insist special ed students attend the public schools.


It is an attempt to combat years of segregation and unequal education. (For decades, all special-education students were sent to separate schools were no one actually taught them/assumed they could succeed).


But my school is a designated special ed school. They teach students with disabilities. That's what they do. I never knew that was illegal. Looks like I'll have to sue them too... The law is the law after all.

emkay625 wrote:This would only make sense in a situation where the student is unable to succeed in a general education environment. For example, a school will often pay for a deaf or blind student to attend a special school, since there's no way all of the teachers at the regular school would know sign language.


Hmm, I don't know about this. I mean, my school allowed me to be with others like me and it was a relief not to be bullied anymore. I was always viciously bullied when I went to Catholic School.

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emkay625
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby emkay625 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:41 am

Philosopher King wrote:
emkay625 wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:
emkay625 wrote:Under IDEA, schools are required to place special-education students in the least-restrictive educational setting. Restrictive in this case does not mean teachers are mean, etc. Restrictive, in terms of special-education history and policy, means segregated from general education students. Putting all of your special education students at one high school is HIGHLY illegal. See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Rest ... nvironment


What?! Special ed schools are illegal? That doesn't make any sense. Trust me, I'm glad I didn't have to go to my public high school because the school district we are in isn't good. They paid the tuition and transportation for the school I went to. From what I've hear, this is pretty common and oftentimes school districts resist doing this and instead insist special ed students attend the public schools.


It is an attempt to combat years of segregation and unequal education. (For decades, all special-education students were sent to separate schools were no one actually taught them/assumed they could succeed).


But my school is a designated special ed school. They teach students with disabilities. That's what they do. I never knew that was illegal. Looks like I'll have to sue them too... The law is the law after all.

emkay625 wrote:This would only make sense in a situation where the student is unable to succeed in a general education environment. For example, a school will often pay for a deaf or blind student to attend a special school, since there's no way all of the teachers at the regular school would know sign language.


Hmm, I don't know about this. I mean, my school allowed me to be with others like me and it was a relief not to be bullied anymore. I was always viciously bullied when I went to Catholic School.


Was it maybe a charter school or private school your parents requested you go to? That would be perfectly legal.

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birdlaw117
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby birdlaw117 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:42 am

Asperger's - Arthritis
Slow Processing - Can't handwrite length exams
Public School - Catholic School

You haven't changed your story at all...

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:42 am

emkay625 wrote:Was it maybe a charter school or private school your parents requested you go to? That would be perfectly legal.

Yes it was a private school of course. And yes my parents requested I go there. There's no way the school district would have volunteered to send me there. We're lucky we didn't have to fight them. The parents of another kid with Asperger's my mom knows had to take their school district to court to get a similar arrangement.

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:46 am

birdlaw117 wrote:Asperger's - Arthritis
Slow Processing - Can't handwrite length exams
Public School - Catholic School

You haven't changed your story at all...


I'll address your points:

1. I have both Asperger's and Arthritis (why wouldn't this be possible?)

2. I have slow processing speed and trouble handwriting lengthy paragraphs (again, why couldn't both be true?)

3. I went to a Catholic School for grades K-5 and then a private school. I never went to a public school nor did I ever claim I did.

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birdlaw117
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby birdlaw117 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:51 am

Philosopher King wrote:
birdlaw117 wrote:Asperger's - Arthritis
Slow Processing - Can't handwrite length exams
Public School - Catholic School

You haven't changed your story at all...


I'll address your points:

1. I have both Asperger's and Arthritis (why wouldn't this be possible?)

2. I have slow processing speed and trouble handwriting lengthy paragraphs (again, why couldn't both be true?)

3. I went to a Catholic School for grades K-5 and then a private school. I never went to a public school nor did I ever claim I did.

3. It was just that you kept on comparing your special ed school to the public high school, specifically using public. Just seemed odd. It's clearly possible that the Catholic School doesn't include a HS, that's common. It was really just a snarky comment because you have little inconsistencies/convenient additions to your story that address specific questions people have.

I already gave you my input earlier in saying that an asterisk on your improved score would greatly benefit you more than most.

Also, I still think you should write your PS on your lawsuit against the LSAC, focusing on how additional time to argue in front of the judge would have allowed you to win your case.

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:54 am

birdlaw117 wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:
birdlaw117 wrote:Asperger's - Arthritis
Slow Processing - Can't handwrite length exams
Public School - Catholic School

You haven't changed your story at all...


I'll address your points:

1. I have both Asperger's and Arthritis (why wouldn't this be possible?)

2. I have slow processing speed and trouble handwriting lengthy paragraphs (again, why couldn't both be true?)

3. I went to a Catholic School for grades K-5 and then a private school. I never went to a public school nor did I ever claim I did.

3. It was just that you kept on comparing your special ed school to the public high school, specifically using public. Just seemed odd. It's clearly possible that the Catholic School doesn't include a HS, that's common. It was really just a snarky comment because you have little inconsistencies/convenient additions to your story that address specific questions people have.

I already gave you my input earlier in saying that an asterisk on your improved score would greatly benefit you more than most.

Also, I still think you should write your PS on your lawsuit against the LSAC, focusing on how additional time to argue in front of the judge would have allowed you to win your case.


There are no inconsistencies in what I say. Someone else mentioned handwriting issues that her Aspergers' students have so I mentioned my own. It made me remember. I just don't view that as a disability like slow processing speed because it can be overcome simply by typing.

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birdlaw117
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby birdlaw117 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 4:01 am

Philosopher King wrote:There are no inconsistencies in what I say. Someone else mentioned handwriting issues that her Aspergers' students have so I mentioned my own. It made me remember. I just don't view that as a disability like slow processing speed because it can be overcome simply by typing.

But you said your slow processing speed becomes worse with handwritten exams. That doesn't seem like something another poster would have to remind you of.

Regardless, I don't give a damn. If you truly need accommodations, you should be fine. If you don't truly need them, quit being an entitled douche. Regardless of whether you need accommodations, quit acting like you the law better than an organization supported by thousands of attorneys; you don't.

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Philosopher King
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 4:04 am

birdlaw117 wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:There are no inconsistencies in what I say. Someone else mentioned handwriting issues that her Aspergers' students have so I mentioned my own. It made me remember. I just don't view that as a disability like slow processing speed because it can be overcome simply by typing.

But you said your slow processing speed becomes worse with handwritten exams. That doesn't seem like something another poster would have to remind you of.

Regardless, I don't give a damn. If you truly need accommodations, you should be fine. If you don't truly need them, quit being an entitled douche. Regardless of whether you need accommodations, quit acting like you the law better than an organization supported by thousands of attorneys; you don't.


It doesn't really affect my LSAT performance, except the writing section which I don't care about. It isn't as big of a problem as the processing speed and it isn't even a factor in most exams. I'm telling you all the truth. I'm not just going to pull shit out of thin air. I'm not like that. I'm actually extremely honest.

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givemea170
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Re: I called LSAC about accommodated scores

Postby givemea170 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:03 am

Philosopher King wrote:
birdlaw117 wrote:
Philosopher King wrote:There are no inconsistencies in what I say. Someone else mentioned handwriting issues that her Aspergers' students have so I mentioned my own. It made me remember. I just don't view that as a disability like slow processing speed because it can be overcome simply by typing.

But you said your slow processing speed becomes worse with handwritten exams. That doesn't seem like something another poster would have to remind you of.

Regardless, I don't give a damn. If you truly need accommodations, you should be fine. If you don't truly need them, quit being an entitled douche. Regardless of whether you need accommodations, quit acting like you the law better than an organization supported by thousands of attorneys; you don't.


It doesn't really affect my LSAT performance, except the writing section which I don't care about. It isn't as big of a problem as the processing speed and it isn't even a factor in most exams. I'm telling you all the truth. I'm not just going to pull shit out of thin air. I'm not like that. I'm actually extremely honest.


Let me ask you this though... don't you think there are people out there that do not have mental disabilities that struggle with the LSAT because their processing times are slower than average or at the very least less of a strength for them than they'd like.

Of the 13 problems I missed on the December LSAT, it seems I missed 7 of them due to running out of time. Missed the last 2 on logic games and last 5 on RC and I know all 7 of those were rushed guesses.

I've never considered myself slow but I'm guessing that there were people who got through those sections without running out of time. Should I be going to the doctor to diagnose my disability or should I accept that the test is supposed to make you feel rushed?




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