Extended Time

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89vision
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Re: Extended Time

Postby 89vision » Fri Jan 06, 2012 1:12 pm

HBK wrote:
89vision wrote:When I have normal time plus nicotine, I can get 5 points higher than my score.


Well there's your answer. Try dipping or Snus.


Snus doesn't have a high enough nicotine content, and it takes 30 minutes to get all of the nicotine. The ones I smoke have 3x the nicotine as other cigs. . You aren't allowed to chew gum, and, again, it takes more than 10-15 minutes to get all of the nicotine. The patch takes more than 10 minutes to work as well. I don't want to be doing that during the test. Sorry, not trying to say smoking alone will result in a higher score. Getting away from everyone for 10 minutes would. Sadly, I lost my E cig before the test, should have just bought another.

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89vision
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Re: Extended Time

Postby 89vision » Fri Jan 06, 2012 1:28 pm

kertz wrote:
89vision wrote:

Well, first off, I had 3 bags, 2 klonopin, and 8 drinks, so this may be a little non coherent. But, I can't sit through tests. Bipolar is linked to concentration and focus issues, based on the links.

My question is whether I should talk to LSAC. Everyone that is bipolar has at least mild ADD. When I have additional time, I kill the LSAT. When I have normal time plus nicotine, I can get 5 points higher than my score. My top school is 3 LSAT points above mine. I was scoring up to 8 points higher. Bipolar is linked to ADD like concentration issues. Those don't manifest until about 18-25. I am in a bad time frame for mental illness. In second grade, this wasn't an issue. In college, it is. Before I was medicated, I had a 3.2 and 3.0, which killed my GPA. Then my worst GPA was 3.5. Is that worth an addendum?

I am not trying to bitch and moan, but bipolar is very much like ADD. Should I try to talk to LSAC? I really want some scholarships, and if I had 5 extra minutes a section, I would be able to overcome my bipolar issues. Bipolar causes issues like ADD. Whether manic or depressive, concentration is lacking, which starts about 17/18 until mid 20s.

I appreciate the feedback, and all the kind words. I don't know what to do. I am really upset that I can't replicate my average PT. Is it worth talking to LSAC? My school helped me so much this semester, because I had insomnia and mood swings, changed meds, and it was basically hell. Bipolar disorder sucks haha.

Any more advice? I don't know if I should send an addendum. I had a drug and alcohol C&F addendum also.

The extra time has to be reasonable. They wouldn't give me an hour to complete the RC. More like an extra 3-5 minutes. If I weren't Bipolar 1, I would be ADD. My doctor is currently giving me ADD meds though, and considering if I have ADD. A much higher number of bipolar individuals have ADD!


Again, thanks for the replies, I appreciate the feedback! I don't want to start a debate, but I want to figure out if I can talk to LSAC and get extended time, like my school already has given me (without sending law schools a buyer beware!).

Thanks again.


Maybe you should shy away from "bags" and "drinks." Look, I have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder too, but I try really hard not to let it get in the way of anything (though sometimes I fail) and I do not expect to receive special treatment for it. I only rarely consume drugs or alcohol because I know those make it worse. I studied my ass off for my LSAT. I also worked my ass off trying to make myself more psychologically stable in the months leading up to this test.

I don't mean to say that everyone is affected by bipolar similarly and that if I could do it this way then so can you. I also think you're entitled to do whatever you want for your score, and I'm not the type of person to care whether or not other people get "unfair advantages." To everyone jumping on this guy, just focus on yourself, that's what is most important.

All that said, given my experience with bipolar disorder, if you can get yourself to be on an online forum posting about how to best take the LSAT, planning on how you're going to get a good score, and have the ability to sit down and take practice tests on your own, then you can study for it without help. Bipolar disorder becomes debilitating when it constantly drives you off into the streets at midnight freaking out about suicidal thoughts or when your mania drives off everyone close to you. Not when you feel a time crunch on the LSAT.


Preaching isn't answering my question.

As you know, the severity of bipolar changes drastically changes based on the person. I have been on the other side, attempting suicide. I missed a month and a half of classes last semester because of bipolar related issues (managed a 3.75). Don't try to condescend my illness, because it sounds like you are.

There are plenty of stories, and I'm not going to have a contest about who is worse off.

I can't just "turn it off" for the LSAT. I can't, nor can anyone, "control" it. It's very wrong of anyone to try and say that, and very holier than though.


Also, I never said the LSAT was debilitating to me, only that I have a medical condition, my school allows extended time (although I only used it for long term projects), and I want to know if I should talk to LSAC.

Please don't try and preach to me about my life. You don't know what I've been through, you don't know how serious my disorder is, you don't even know if I've ever been hospitalized. Maybe, just maybe, it's not something I can control. I'm doing everything my doctor reccommends, and there are still many aspects I can't control. I'm not asking for anything special, just an accommodation that my school gave me my last semester, to make things fair. Maybe you have a mild case and can control most aspects of it, but I don't. It is really wrong of you to think since you can "handle" it so well, I should be able to.


I really shouldn't have had to write any of that to a person who is bipolar, and I don't know of anyone who is bipolar who would say something like that...
I want to know if it's worth asking LSAC, and if anyone on here has done that.

kertz
Posts: 36
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2011 11:02 am

Re: Extended Time

Postby kertz » Fri Jan 06, 2012 2:16 pm

89vision wrote:
kertz wrote:
89vision wrote:

Well, first off, I had 3 bags, 2 klonopin, and 8 drinks, so this may be a little non coherent. But, I can't sit through tests. Bipolar is linked to concentration and focus issues, based on the links.

My question is whether I should talk to LSAC. Everyone that is bipolar has at least mild ADD. When I have additional time, I kill the LSAT. When I have normal time plus nicotine, I can get 5 points higher than my score. My top school is 3 LSAT points above mine. I was scoring up to 8 points higher. Bipolar is linked to ADD like concentration issues. Those don't manifest until about 18-25. I am in a bad time frame for mental illness. In second grade, this wasn't an issue. In college, it is. Before I was medicated, I had a 3.2 and 3.0, which killed my GPA. Then my worst GPA was 3.5. Is that worth an addendum?

I am not trying to bitch and moan, but bipolar is very much like ADD. Should I try to talk to LSAC? I really want some scholarships, and if I had 5 extra minutes a section, I would be able to overcome my bipolar issues. Bipolar causes issues like ADD. Whether manic or depressive, concentration is lacking, which starts about 17/18 until mid 20s.

I appreciate the feedback, and all the kind words. I don't know what to do. I am really upset that I can't replicate my average PT. Is it worth talking to LSAC? My school helped me so much this semester, because I had insomnia and mood swings, changed meds, and it was basically hell. Bipolar disorder sucks haha.

Any more advice? I don't know if I should send an addendum. I had a drug and alcohol C&F addendum also.

The extra time has to be reasonable. They wouldn't give me an hour to complete the RC. More like an extra 3-5 minutes. If I weren't Bipolar 1, I would be ADD. My doctor is currently giving me ADD meds though, and considering if I have ADD. A much higher number of bipolar individuals have ADD!


Again, thanks for the replies, I appreciate the feedback! I don't want to start a debate, but I want to figure out if I can talk to LSAC and get extended time, like my school already has given me (without sending law schools a buyer beware!).

Thanks again.


Maybe you should shy away from "bags" and "drinks." Look, I have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder too, but I try really hard not to let it get in the way of anything (though sometimes I fail) and I do not expect to receive special treatment for it. I only rarely consume drugs or alcohol because I know those make it worse. I studied my ass off for my LSAT. I also worked my ass off trying to make myself more psychologically stable in the months leading up to this test.

I don't mean to say that everyone is affected by bipolar similarly and that if I could do it this way then so can you. I also think you're entitled to do whatever you want for your score, and I'm not the type of person to care whether or not other people get "unfair advantages." To everyone jumping on this guy, just focus on yourself, that's what is most important.

All that said, given my experience with bipolar disorder, if you can get yourself to be on an online forum posting about how to best take the LSAT, planning on how you're going to get a good score, and have the ability to sit down and take practice tests on your own, then you can study for it without help. Bipolar disorder becomes debilitating when it constantly drives you off into the streets at midnight freaking out about suicidal thoughts or when your mania drives off everyone close to you. Not when you feel a time crunch on the LSAT.


Preaching isn't answering my question.

As you know, the severity of bipolar changes drastically changes based on the person. I have been on the other side, attempting suicide. I missed a month and a half of classes last semester because of bipolar related issues (managed a 3.75). Don't try to condescend my illness, because it sounds like you are.

There are plenty of stories, and I'm not going to have a contest about who is worse off.

I can't just "turn it off" for the LSAT. I can't, nor can anyone, "control" it. It's very wrong of anyone to try and say that, and very holier than though.


Also, I never said the LSAT was debilitating to me, only that I have a medical condition, my school allows extended time (although I only used it for long term projects), and I want to know if I should talk to LSAC.

Please don't try and preach to me about my life. You don't know what I've been through, you don't know how serious my disorder is, you don't even know if I've ever been hospitalized. Maybe, just maybe, it's not something I can control. I'm doing everything my doctor reccommends, and there are still many aspects I can't control. I'm not asking for anything special, just an accommodation that my school gave me my last semester, to make things fair. Maybe you have a mild case and can control most aspects of it, but I don't. It is really wrong of you to think since you can "handle" it so well, I should be able to.


I really shouldn't have had to write any of that to a person who is bipolar, and I don't know of anyone who is bipolar who would say something like that...
I want to know if it's worth asking LSAC, and if anyone on here has done that.


Like I said in my post, "I don't mean to say that everyone is affected by bipolar similarly and that if I could do it this way then so can you."

I am saying that I tried really hard to get myself in the best shape I could for this test, and it paid. I know bipolar disorder can't be "turned off." I know that better than most. I don't want to go into shit I've been through, because we all have our problems, and I'm sure you've been through the same shit if not worse. I've had a lot of luck, and a lot of support from my family, and access to good doctors, therapists, and medication for years. I have been blessed in many ways in dealing with this disorder. I'm not saying that everyone has the same experience with bipolar disorder. I'm not saying that everyone has these same resources. I'm not even saying that all bipolar disorders can be managed. But I do think that we can manipulate our environments and even our mindsets to some extent. I wasn't being facetious when I said you should shy away from drugs and drinks. I don't know your story and I won't assume that I do.

I'm sorry if I sounded "holier than thou." Best of luck.
Last edited by kertz on Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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89vision
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Re: Extended Time

Postby 89vision » Fri Jan 06, 2012 7:29 pm

kertz wrote:
89vision wrote:
kertz wrote:
89vision wrote:

Well, first off, I had 3 bags, 2 klonopin, and 8 drinks, so this may be a little non coherent. But, I can't sit through tests. Bipolar is linked to concentration and focus issues, based on the links.

My question is whether I should talk to LSAC. Everyone that is bipolar has at least mild ADD. When I have additional time, I kill the LSAT. When I have normal time plus nicotine, I can get 5 points higher than my score. My top school is 3 LSAT points above mine. I was scoring up to 8 points higher. Bipolar is linked to ADD like concentration issues. Those don't manifest until about 18-25. I am in a bad time frame for mental illness. In second grade, this wasn't an issue. In college, it is. Before I was medicated, I had a 3.2 and 3.0, which killed my GPA. Then my worst GPA was 3.5. Is that worth an addendum?

I am not trying to bitch and moan, but bipolar is very much like ADD. Should I try to talk to LSAC? I really want some scholarships, and if I had 5 extra minutes a section, I would be able to overcome my bipolar issues. Bipolar causes issues like ADD. Whether manic or depressive, concentration is lacking, which starts about 17/18 until mid 20s.

I appreciate the feedback, and all the kind words. I don't know what to do. I am really upset that I can't replicate my average PT. Is it worth talking to LSAC? My school helped me so much this semester, because I had insomnia and mood swings, changed meds, and it was basically hell. Bipolar disorder sucks haha.

Any more advice? I don't know if I should send an addendum. I had a drug and alcohol C&F addendum also.

The extra time has to be reasonable. They wouldn't give me an hour to complete the RC. More like an extra 3-5 minutes. If I weren't Bipolar 1, I would be ADD. My doctor is currently giving me ADD meds though, and considering if I have ADD. A much higher number of bipolar individuals have ADD!


Again, thanks for the replies, I appreciate the feedback! I don't want to start a debate, but I want to figure out if I can talk to LSAC and get extended time, like my school already has given me (without sending law schools a buyer beware!).

Thanks again.


Maybe you should shy away from "bags" and "drinks." Look, I have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder too, but I try really hard not to let it get in the way of anything (though sometimes I fail) and I do not expect to receive special treatment for it. I only rarely consume drugs or alcohol because I know those make it worse. I studied my ass off for my LSAT. I also worked my ass off trying to make myself more psychologically stable in the months leading up to this test.

I don't mean to say that everyone is affected by bipolar similarly and that if I could do it this way then so can you. I also think you're entitled to do whatever you want for your score, and I'm not the type of person to care whether or not other people get "unfair advantages." To everyone jumping on this guy, just focus on yourself, that's what is most important.

All that said, given my experience with bipolar disorder, if you can get yourself to be on an online forum posting about how to best take the LSAT, planning on how you're going to get a good score, and have the ability to sit down and take practice tests on your own, then you can study for it without help. Bipolar disorder becomes debilitating when it constantly drives you off into the streets at midnight freaking out about suicidal thoughts or when your mania drives off everyone close to you. Not when you feel a time crunch on the LSAT.


Preaching isn't answering my question.

As you know, the severity of bipolar changes drastically changes based on the person. I have been on the other side, attempting suicide. I missed a month and a half of classes last semester because of bipolar related issues (managed a 3.75). Don't try to condescend my illness, because it sounds like you are.

There are plenty of stories, and I'm not going to have a contest about who is worse off.

I can't just "turn it off" for the LSAT. I can't, nor can anyone, "control" it. It's very wrong of anyone to try and say that, and very holier than though.


Also, I never said the LSAT was debilitating to me, only that I have a medical condition, my school allows extended time (although I only used it for long term projects), and I want to know if I should talk to LSAC.

Please don't try and preach to me about my life. You don't know what I've been through, you don't know how serious my disorder is, you don't even know if I've ever been hospitalized. Maybe, just maybe, it's not something I can control. I'm doing everything my doctor reccommends, and there are still many aspects I can't control. I'm not asking for anything special, just an accommodation that my school gave me my last semester, to make things fair. Maybe you have a mild case and can control most aspects of it, but I don't. It is really wrong of you to think since you can "handle" it so well, I should be able to.


I really shouldn't have had to write any of that to a person who is bipolar, and I don't know of anyone who is bipolar who would say something like that...
I want to know if it's worth asking LSAC, and if anyone on here has done that.


Like I said in my post, "I don't mean to say that everyone is affected by bipolar similarly and that if I could do it this way then so can you."

I am saying that I tried really hard to get myself in the best shape I could for this test, and it paid. I know bipolar disorder can't be "turned off." I know that better than most. I don't want to go into shit I've been through, because we all have our problems, and I'm sure you've been through the same shit if not worse. I've had a lot of luck, and a lot of support from my family, and access to good doctors, therapists, and medication for years. I have been blessed in many ways in dealing with this disorder. I'm not saying that everyone has the same experience with bipolar disorder. I'm not saying that everyone has these same resources. I'm not even saying that all bipolar disorders can be managed. But I do think that we can manipulate our environments and even our mindsets to some extent. I wasn't being facetious when I said you should shy away from drugs and drinks. I don't know your story and I won't assume that I do, but I just wanted to say that that's what made the biggest difference for me.

I'm sorry if I sounded "holier than thou." Best of luck.



Thanks, I took that too personal. These things don't translate well on line. Do you have any advice? I've tried everything my Pdoc suggested, but things aren't clicking. I appreciate any insight.

I've had a lot of issues with finding the right doctors, affording treatment, and finding the right medications.

My dad decided he wanted to get involved, called a doctor, told them I was depressed, and the doctor put me on antidepressent, Without evaluating me for bipolar, even though I was already diagnosed with it one month prior, and sent him the evaluation (which took over an hour). My dad didn't let me see the first doctor because the doctor said I was bipolar. I had an out of this world manic episode for over a month, almost ended up in jail, and basically went crazy. It took 2 weeks of a lot of risperidone for me to come down, and I almost was hospitalized (that terrifies me). The doctor was like "oh, well I guess the first diagnosis was right and I should have given a more extensive evaluation" This was my first medication experience, and I no longer involve my dad in any of my health decisions. Or my mother, who doesn't understand why I need to see one doctor for a prescription, and another to talk to as a therapist.

How long did it take for you to find a good therapist and the right meds? I've struggled with drug addiction since my freshmen year, which is why I actually started getting help. I've been diagnosed with substance use disorder 5 times since, which has been defeating. Shit's been rough, and I'm just looking for the same help from LSAC I got from my school. I don't want handouts or anything, just some understanding.

For school, I mostly utilized flexible attendence and paper extensions, but only received this my last 3 months of classes. The majority of the B's I received were due to poor attendance. I can handle the academics, but the mood swings, anxiety, and concentration issues have really been hard to deal with.

I get really frustrated when people thing that bipolar disorder isn't serious or impacts everyday life. I've driven my family and friends crazy the past 5 years. Things usually calm down after young adulthood and

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kerflux
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Re: Extended Time

Postby kerflux » Fri Jan 06, 2012 7:46 pm

Fyo'Couch wrote:
89vision wrote:I really am not trying to be a dick, but I honestly scored a genius IQ in school as part of a gifted program.


This sounds like something Will Ferrell would say in a movie while trying to pick up chicks.



180

lol'd at work. thank you.

*You could also try applying the time and effort that you plan to use to secure additional time on the test to... I don't know, maybe study for the test? Btw, you were a genius in 2nd grade... that was 2nd grade, brotha. I know people who were tall in 2nd grade, and they're at my shoulder now.

Someone said earlier that the LSAT is an attempt at leveling the playing field - respect that, and stop trying to tilt it to your advantage. Jesus bro, you're complaining about not getting your nicotine? And, wait, you're bipolar but you're abusing alcohol and drugs? Lmao, I find it hard to even take this seriously now. Don't expect LSAC to grant you extra time to accomodate a supposed disability when you are intentionally exacerbating its symptoms.

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89vision
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Re: Extended Time

Postby 89vision » Fri Jan 06, 2012 8:57 pm

kerflux wrote:
Fyo'Couch wrote:
89vision wrote:I really am not trying to be a dick, but I honestly scored a genius IQ in school as part of a gifted program.


This sounds like something Will Ferrell would say in a movie while trying to pick up chicks.



180

lol'd at work. thank you.

*You could also try applying the time and effort that you plan to use to secure additional time on the test to... I don't know, maybe study for the test? Btw, you were a genius in 2nd grade... that was 2nd grade, brotha. I know people who were tall in 2nd grade, and they're at my shoulder now.

Someone said earlier that the LSAT is an attempt at leveling the playing field - respect that, and stop trying to tilt it to your advantage. Jesus bro, you're complaining about not getting your nicotine? And, wait, you're bipolar but you're abusing alcohol and drugs? Lmao, I find it hard to even take this seriously now. Don't expect LSAC to grant you extra time to accomodate a supposed disability when you are intentionally exacerbating its symptoms.


Actually, the most accurate time to test IQ is as early as possible. If you knew that, maybe you wouldn't make an incorrect statement. You really should understand what you are talking about before typing out a comment that is meant to be hurtful.

It's not like I'm on here saying "look at me, I'm a genius, and you're not." This isn't about my IQ score. Stop taking it out of context and acting like a bully. My point is that I scored well on an IQ test, and the SATs, so I'm not stupid, and these were before the bipolar disorder became much more serious. Again, if you chose to read the posts, you would understand this disorder peaks at this time of my life, and it is a serious enough condition that you can obtain disability benefits for it. I'm not bragging about it. You don't even know me, so it is kind of stupid of you to assume anything about my intelligence.

I did study for the test, bro. If you read the post, I stated I scored well on the PTs (I took 40+). My highest PTs were a very respectable score, and were on days that I was able to actually focus. I don't think you understand bipolar disorder, or have read extensively about it, so your comments about it are rather useless. I posted links explaining the concentration issues associated with bipolar disorder, and not only did you not take the time to read them, but you made an incorrect comment about the content of those links. And yet you ridicule me about my IQ. That's pretty funny.

How is asking for the same accommodations that I receive from my university, as suggested by a doctor, trying to create an advantage? I'm not asking for anything other than what I already receive. Would you explain why that request is "tilting the test to my advantage" when my doctor's already agreed with my school that extended time was fair to combat my medical condition?

It is really ignorant of you to call bipolar disorder a "supposed disability" when it is documented and my university granted my request halfway through my last semester. I have been diagnosed by 5 different doctors. There is nothing fake about it. It is wrong of you to demean it, when you demonstrate a lack of knowledge about it. Drug addiction has a high correlation with bipolar disorder. You obviously don't understand addiction, either. It started BEFORE I was medicated, and I have struggled with it since. If it were easy to just stop shooting heroin, how many addicts do you think there would be? Also, I've never used drugs to get high, but to regulate my moods, and to keep me from either wanting to kill myself or going fucking manic. You also don't seem to understand that aspect.

Don't criticize what you don't understand or try to understand. If you had similar issues, I would try to support your efforts to get help. You post was mean spirited and ignorant.

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Re: Extended Time

Postby kublaikahn » Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:10 pm

Instead of more time, they could just give you easier questions.

If you are bipolar doesn't that mean on some days you can perform like Stephan Hawking? How do they know you won't have a "good" day when testing. Maybe they should give you less time.

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89vision
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Re: Extended Time

Postby 89vision » Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:33 pm

kublaikahn wrote:Instead of more time, they could just give you easier questions.

If you are bipolar doesn't that mean on some days you can perform like Stephan Hawking? How do they know you won't have a "good" day when testing. Maybe they should give you less time.


It isn't like that. A "good" day is having normal brain activity, not hyperactivity. Concentration issues occur in mania, hypomania, and depression. Medications don't prevent any of the three, only delay manic and depressive states. Please read up on bipolar disorder before making ignorant and rude comments.

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sunynp
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Re: Extended Time

Postby sunynp » Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:52 pm

I think that the answer is that none of us know the answer. We don't know if you can win against the LSAT on this issue and we don't know what you should do. I'm don't care about the whole unfair advantage thing. My very general understanding is that the law gives accomadations for disabilities to even the playing field, not to give an advantage. I think that most people would rather not have to deal with a disability on a day to day basis, but they are envious of people who get more time to complete tasks.

I also agree that law school and practice are not at all like the LSAT - but you will have to pass the bar, which is also a timed test. There are some, not many, disabled lawyers. The Association of the Bar of the City of New York does a lot of work in this and one of the recent presidents was disabled (maybe blind? I don't remember.)

My only helpful suggestion is to contact the LSAT and go through their procedure. If you can't afford the testing, maybe you can find a program that will give you the tests for less. I know that the PhD program at Columbia has a discount for testing if it is conducted by a PhD candidate under the supervision of the head doctor. Other places may have similar discounts. It still isn't cheap - but it might be worth it.

I also think you should check with your doctors about going to law school with a dibilitating mental illness. There have been threads here about going to law school with depression and how difficult it is to manage. Law school is a whole three years of crazy making stress and competition.

I just honestly don't know if it will be possible for you to manage your illness and succeed in law school. I'm not really sure why you would want to undertake law school, but as you do, the best and only recourse you have is to go through the LSAC process.

kublaikahn
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Re: Extended Time

Postby kublaikahn » Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:18 pm

89vision wrote:
kublaikahn wrote:Instead of more time, they could just give you easier questions.

If you are bipolar doesn't that mean on some days you can perform like Stephan Hawking? How do they know you won't have a "good" day when testing. Maybe they should give you less time.


It isn't like that. A "good" day is having normal brain activity, not hyperactivity. Concentration issues occur in mania, hypomania, and depression. Medications don't prevent any of the three, only delay manic and depressive states. Please read up on bipolar disorder before making ignorant and rude comments.


I googled it and found this:
2. Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder.
Half true. Bipolar disorder certainly affects mood, but it also affects cognition and the ability to perform mental tasks. Some days we can out-think Stephen Hawking. Other days we make Forrest Gump look like an intellectual.
Bipolar, like ADD, is way over diagnosed. Maybe you have it maybe you don't, but if you are a URM with a 170/3.81 my opinion is you should sit down and STFU. Your greatest disadvantage is that you have to carry around your gigantic pity pot.

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Ohiobumpkin
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Re: Extended Time

Postby Ohiobumpkin » Sat Jan 07, 2012 1:59 am

If ADHD is your condition, I hate to inform you that you will have a very hard time convincing them for more time. I received accommodations (extra time) after undergoing a new cognitive evaluation. I emphasize new because I have decades of documentation for my disability. I literally could prove in court without a doubt I have a disability. After sending in 8 pounds of documentation, I was approved for testing accommodations. Not all insurance covers cognitive evaluations (I got 80% covered because I have great insurance). W/o insurance it can cost around $3,000 for a professional evaluation. Even then you're not guaranteed you'll receive accommodations. Individuals with ADHD are the most commonly rejected by LSAC. If your LD is the result of a life-long medical condition, birth defect, or something else, you would have much better luck. Hope it goes well for you.

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89vision
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Re: Extended Time

Postby 89vision » Sun Jan 08, 2012 6:10 am

kublaikahn wrote:
89vision wrote:
kublaikahn wrote:Instead of more time, they could just give you easier questions.

If you are bipolar doesn't that mean on some days you can perform like Stephan Hawking? How do they know you won't have a "good" day when testing. Maybe they should give you less time.


It isn't like that. A "good" day is having normal brain activity, not hyperactivity. Concentration issues occur in mania, hypomania, and depression. Medications don't prevent any of the three, only delay manic and depressive states. Please read up on bipolar disorder before making ignorant and rude comments.


I googled it and found this:
2. Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder.
Half true. Bipolar disorder certainly affects mood, but it also affects cognition and the ability to perform mental tasks. Some days we can out-think Stephen Hawking. Other days we make Forrest Gump look like an intellectual.
Bipolar, like ADD, is way over diagnosed. Maybe you have it maybe you don't, but if you are a URM with a 170/3.81 my opinion is you should sit down and STFU. Your greatest disadvantage is that you have to carry around your gigantic pity pot.


I think reading about it on google and actually having it are a little bit different. I have had pyschotic episodes due to mania, and had suicide attempts when I was younger. Self infliction, suicidal thoughts starting in second grade...it is very real to me. I have been diagnosed by 4+ doctor's. You don't know me, and you certainly don't know my medical history, so maybe you should STFU.

It is really rude of you to base this on one google search. I've dealt with this my entire life, over 4 family members of mine have it, and I've been through hell dealing with it. Even in the off chance I had a day when I could outthink Hawkins, and that day happened to be during the LSAT, those are the rare exceptions to the normal day with someone who is bipolar. Just because it is over diagnosed does not mean I don't have it. It is really offensive for you to act like you understand it based on an internet search. How ignorant of you to make such a comment about a person you don't even know!

Like I said, my question is based on receiving help from my school.

User avatar
89vision
Posts: 431
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2011 5:49 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby 89vision » Sun Jan 08, 2012 6:21 am

Ohiobumpkin wrote:If ADHD is your condition, I hate to inform you that you will have a very hard time convincing them for more time. I received accommodations (extra time) after undergoing a new cognitive evaluation. I emphasize new because I have decades of documentation for my disability. I literally could prove in court without a doubt I have a disability. After sending in 8 pounds of documentation, I was approved for testing accommodations. Not all insurance covers cognitive evaluations (I got 80% covered because I have great insurance). W/o insurance it can cost around $3,000 for a professional evaluation. Even then you're not guaranteed you'll receive accommodations. Individuals with ADHD are the most commonly rejected by LSAC. If your LD is the result of a life-long medical condition, birth defect, or something else, you would have much better luck. Hope it goes well for you.


Thank's for taking the time to share and answer my question.

I have 3 doctors, and 2 doctors from different rehab places, so 5 total, documenting my condition. There are about 3 therapists who also evaluated me during my time in rehab. It is on record with my college (beginning soph yr), and my symptoms of started in 2nd grade (on file with my elementary school).

I was thinking about calling on Monday. I am meeting with my old doctor about a couple of things, including getting on Suboxone, and want to see what the testing would cost. I can't get an RX for anything like adderall or ritalin because I have drug addictions in my medical record. I am trying Strattera, but it hasn't been too effective. My therapist this summer noted I am in a state of hypomania regularly, and still have at least 1 mild to severe manic episode and 2 depressive episodes a year. All three are considered by doctor's to impact focus and concentration. Like I said, none of the medications prevent mood swings, just delay them, which is why this is a bit different than ADHD, just from my understanding though. I obviously am not saying 1 is more serious at all, I have a few friends with ADD. One is unmedicated and has struggled his whole life, enduring 5 trips to rehab.

Again, I appreciate your response, and everyone who has been respectful. I can tell there is still mental health stigma's based on some of the harsher posts. It's a shame.

For those with experience:

Anything specific I should ask? And should I schedule for Feb, or would it take much longer than that to get everything done?

User avatar
Jeffort
Posts: 1896
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby Jeffort » Sun Jan 08, 2012 3:28 pm

89vision,

I feel for you and my heart goes out to you. Being afflicted with bipolar disorder is no fun and creates many life challenges.

Try to ignore the glib posts of the passing-through idiots/a-holes on this board. Most of them do not/will not understand or be sympathetic or understanding of your condition, the symptoms, or about how it affects your life. Many of the arrogant/a-hole posters are simply just young gunners competing to get into a good law school that are fueled by hopes and dreams of six figure $$salaries and luxury cars. Sometimes they try to increase their chances of success with attempts to impair the performance and chances of others.

I'm not bipolar but I have a lot of direct experience with people that were dealt a bad genetic hand and afflicted with the biologically based brain disorder. I performed clinical assessments, cognitive tests, observations, research studies, etc. with many patients admitted to a lock-up neuropsychiatric facility for roughly two years before I went to law school.

Also, over the course of about five years I lived in an apartment with a spare room that I rented out short-term to people moving/in transition that needed a temporary place to stay. I ended up having a few Bipolar tenants pass through during that time.

My Ex-girlfriend I was in a relationship with for almost four years turned out to be Bipolar and the beginning of the worst phase of it manifested and was diagnosed after she moved in and we were living together. That really sucked because she was rapid cycling and taking massive amounts of ADD/ADHD meds every day (Adderall, Dexedrine or Desoxyn), whatever she could get a doctor to Rx her. She hid that habit from me for months, I learned about it later once she started having frequent psychotic episodes and started popping the pills in front of me, up to 40mgs at a time.

The amphetamine and other ADD/ADHD stimulate meds/drugs put her into paranoid delusional psychotic episodes frequently, usually within an hour of when she took them. She refused to take any of the medications for Bipolar except when forced to in the MANY times she got locked up on a psych hold (5150/5250 in CA, Baker Act Hold in Florida, etc.). She was and possibly still is (if she is still alive) adamant that she just has ADD/ADHD, loves the amphetamines and argued that they are the proper drugs for her. From direct observations, many stories that would take hundreds of pages to write, I knew they were the wrong meds for her condition but she wouldn't listen to me or the various doctors.

ADD/ADHD and Bipolar are frequently confused with one another and/or misdiagnosed due to similarities of the symptoms and other reasons including affects of drugs the patient in treatment has been taking.

The one medication that worked wonders during the brief periods she took it was Abilify. She snapped back to normal instantly and it's a one pill a day med. Unfortunately, her attitude once out of psychosis and back to normal because of the medication was "I'm fine, there is nothing wrong with me, I don't need these" and then she threw them away. Medication compliance and substance abuse issues are a common problem with Bipolar afflicted people.

Anyway, long story, ExGF is currently a fugitive on the run with many warrants out for her arrest and I have a restraining order against her due to many domestic violence incidents when she was psychotic, got violent, and the police showed up. Her current/recent situation that I know of is mainly because she refused to follow medical/psychiatric advice, take the proper meds, follow-up with and be honest with the doctors.

The biggest problems I've noticed with Bipolar people are medication compliance, showing up for follow-up care, being honest with the doctors/therapists, and substance abuse.

Regarding getting extended time for the LSAT, you can give it a shot but it will most likely be a long difficult, very time consuming, frustrating, and expensive road with an unfavorable chance of success. They don't grant extra time accommodations easily, especially when the basis of the request is for psychiatric attention/concentration/mood disorder related issues.

Best of Luck to you.

Being Bipolar is not the end of the world.
Many very successful and famous people over history that have done and contributed amazing things to humanity have been bipolar.

Here are a few links:
http://www.mental-health-today.com/bp/famous_people.htm
http://www.famousbipolarpeople.com/
--LinkRemoved--

PS: Here is a great song from Sting that is wonderful. He is Bipolar, has admitted it publicly, is very successful and has created many moving songs and videos amongst other things.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=037uSAIahho&NR=1
Last edited by Jeffort on Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Philosopher King
Posts: 218
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 11:25 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby Philosopher King » Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:22 pm

IGotMy170 wrote:The fact is that giving extra time on the LSAT just completely ruins the whole point of the LSAT.


Seeing that there is no valid point to the LSAT, I don't see the problem here

TommyK wrote:Came here hoping for PhilosophyKing. Disappointed...


Surprise Surprise, I'm not the only one who has these problems.

To the OP: Getting the required testing is expensive so if your insurance doesn't cover it then it is impossible for many young adults to afford. Furthermore, LSAC is so stingy that it may not guarantee accommodations. I just don't have an answer to your dilemma other than saying there goes another person that would probably be a good law student and lawyer being screwed by a corrupt system.

User avatar
Ohiobumpkin
Posts: 465
Joined: Fri Oct 21, 2011 9:50 am

Re: Extended Time

Postby Ohiobumpkin » Sun Jan 08, 2012 10:07 pm

89vision wrote:
Ohiobumpkin wrote:If ADHD is your condition, I hate to inform you that you will have a very hard time convincing them for more time. I received accommodations (extra time) after undergoing a new cognitive evaluation. I emphasize new because I have decades of documentation for my disability. I literally could prove in court without a doubt I have a disability. After sending in 8 pounds of documentation, I was approved for testing accommodations. Not all insurance covers cognitive evaluations (I got 80% covered because I have great insurance). W/o insurance it can cost around $3,000 for a professional evaluation. Even then you're not guaranteed you'll receive accommodations. Individuals with ADHD are the most commonly rejected by LSAC. If your LD is the result of a life-long medical condition, birth defect, or something else, you would have much better luck. Hope it goes well for you.


Thank's for taking the time to share and answer my question.

I have 3 doctors, and 2 doctors from different rehab places, so 5 total, documenting my condition. There are about 3 therapists who also evaluated me during my time in rehab. It is on record with my college (beginning soph yr), and my symptoms of started in 2nd grade (on file with my elementary school).

I was thinking about calling on Monday. I am meeting with my old doctor about a couple of things, including getting on Suboxone, and want to see what the testing would cost. I can't get an RX for anything like adderall or ritalin because I have drug addictions in my medical record. I am trying Strattera, but it hasn't been too effective. My therapist this summer noted I am in a state of hypomania regularly, and still have at least 1 mild to severe manic episode and 2 depressive episodes a year. All three are considered by doctor's to impact focus and concentration. Like I said, none of the medications prevent mood swings, just delay them, which is why this is a bit different than ADHD, just from my understanding though. I obviously am not saying 1 is more serious at all, I have a few friends with ADD. One is unmedicated and has struggled his whole life, enduring 5 trips to rehab.

Again, I appreciate your response, and everyone who has been respectful. I can tell there is still mental health stigma's based on some of the harsher posts. It's a shame.

For those with experience:

Anything specific I should ask? And should I schedule for Feb, or would it take much longer than that to get everything done?


LSAC is also unforgiving towards emotional issue related disabilities. I don't think you'll have time to get all the necessary documents in order for February. I would hold off until June, get ALL your documentation together and reapply for accommodations. With luck you'll be able to get accommodations, but I would also use the extra time between now and June to find a suitable ADHD medication and study your ass off for normal testing conditions. This will prepare you for the possibility that you might not get accommodations, and if you do you'll even be more prepared to ace the fudger.

User avatar
moneybagsphd
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2011 11:07 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby moneybagsphd » Mon Jan 09, 2012 12:27 am

89vision wrote:Actually, the most accurate time to test IQ is as early as possible. If you knew that, maybe you wouldn't make an incorrect statement. You really should understand what you are talking about before typing out a comment that is meant to be hurtful.

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaahaha

User avatar
Philosopher King
Posts: 218
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 11:25 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby Philosopher King » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:41 am

moneybagsphd wrote:
89vision wrote:Actually, the most accurate time to test IQ is as early as possible. If you knew that, maybe you wouldn't make an incorrect statement. You really should understand what you are talking about before typing out a comment that is meant to be hurtful.

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaahaha


What's so funny?

User avatar
TommyK
Posts: 1309
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:08 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby TommyK » Mon Jan 09, 2012 10:41 am

Philosopher King wrote:
TommyK wrote:Came here hoping for PhilosophyKing. Disappointed...


blah blah blah


Yay! The prophecy has come true! brb, lemme grab some popcorn

User avatar
moneybagsphd
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2011 11:07 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby moneybagsphd » Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:11 pm

Philosopher King wrote:
moneybagsphd wrote:
89vision wrote:Actually, the most accurate time to test IQ is as early as possible. If you knew that, maybe you wouldn't make an incorrect statement. You really should understand what you are talking about before typing out a comment that is meant to be hurtful.

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaahaha


What's so funny?

This is retarded. Childhood IQ is not necessarily predictive of adult IQ, just as tall children sometimes end up being short adults.

keyanaut
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2011 7:55 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby keyanaut » Mon Jan 09, 2012 10:44 pm

Anyone know how someone would fair after recently having one eye severed in a car accident? It strains me having only one working eye. My bad eye provides double vision issues, so it's tough.

User avatar
itsirtou
Posts: 401
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 10:05 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby itsirtou » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:02 pm

keyanaut wrote:Anyone know how someone would fair after recently having one eye severed in a car accident? It strains me having only one working eye. My bad eye provides double vision issues, so it's tough.


How recent is recent? I'm in essentially the same boat -- I can only use one eye, with double vision if I attempt to use both. If it's very recent, your muscles might be underdeveloped enough in your now-dominant eye that a doctor would say that your ability to read is diminished. But idk...I kind of doubt you can get an accommodation for it unless it was super-recent and you haven't had time to adapt physically to it.

MrAnon
Posts: 1615
Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2010 9:08 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby MrAnon » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:14 pm

It doesn't sound like you need extra time. Your practice tests and real test were pretty close.

User avatar
Duramax80
Posts: 134
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2011 4:34 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby Duramax80 » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:55 pm

89vision wrote:
Well, first off, I had 3 bags, 2 klonopin, and 8 drinks, so this may be a little non coherent.


Personally, I think this is all you need:

--ImageRemoved--

Fyo'Couch
Posts: 136
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 7:38 pm

Re: Extended Time

Postby Fyo'Couch » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:57 pm

Does anyone know if LSAC provides accommodations for other "performance anxiety" related issues? I've had over 6 medical professionals diagnose me with erectile dysfunction and confirm that because this defect is cognitive in origin, it likely impairs my "performance" in all major life events. During my prep, I was regularly cycling Cialis and testing consistently in the 170's. During my recent December sitting however, I decided not to take any the morning of for fear of prompting a "major distraction" at my testing center and scored a measly 169 (ironic, I know). Does anyone know if LSAC provides accommodations for this sort of thing?
Thanks.

Edit: Just wanted to add that I have a history of great performances before being diagnosed with this debilitating condition. In grade 7, I lead the junior boys basketball team in minutes played, and assist/turnover ratio along with placing in the top 5 in many other defensive metrics. I'm not trying to be a dick, but I was probably the 3rd best point guard at my school (including grade 8's).
Last edited by Fyo'Couch on Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:09 am, edited 1 time in total.




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