Is RC the hardest section to study for?

Which section is the hardest to study for?

Logic Games
1
5%
Reading Comprehension
17
77%
Logical Reasoning
4
18%
 
Total votes: 22

vtoodler
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 7:19 pm

Is RC the hardest section to study for?

Postby vtoodler » Tue Jan 03, 2012 5:06 pm

According to old discussion threads, it is significantly harder to improve your Reading Comprehension (RC) score than to improve your score on the other sections.

Did you find that to be true? Did you find that it took you much more time/ effort to work on RC than the other sections?

I'm including an anonymous poll to this thread.

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rinkrat19
Posts: 13917
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Is RC the hardest section to study for?

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Jan 03, 2012 5:17 pm

I think it's not so much that it requires more work, it's that there's not much you CAN do to improve RC. It, more than the other sections, seem to be based on an innate ability to absorb and interpret dense written material, and not so much on a set of rules or steps you can learn by rote in a few months. The correlation between being a voracious lifetime reader and getting a good RC score seems to be high, and it's not like you can go back in time 15 years and change your reading habits from childhood.

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LexLeon
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Re: Is RC the hardest section to study for?

Postby LexLeon » Wed Jan 04, 2012 2:08 pm

In my opinion no one section is inherently the most difficult to learn. The difficulty depends on the strengths, weaknesses, interests and so forth of the test taker. In other words, the most difficult section is for the most part subjective.

To some people, reading is a chore (why attend law school, then? Anyway...). To others, reading is pleasurable, and thus they do it in their spare time. The latter class of students will find the RC section more manageable in general, due to their mental predispositions and aptitudes; and they may therefore even find the RC section fun. In my own case, I genuinely want to learn what about most if not all of the passages have to say (philosophy, law, natural science, economics, etc. are all of interest to me). This, in addition to the fact that I am actually intrinsically motivated to read anyway, leads to my success on this particular section. (By the way, I have not been an edacious reader since childhood; in fact, I was, since middle school, a lackluster student and intellectual, until my last year of high school; and a contrario, since college began about 2 years ago, I have actively pursued wisdom and knowledge. I mention this to demonstrate that many years of reading is not necessary to be successful on this section.)

In other instances, students may be gifted in mathematics, or have regularly enjoyed puzzles of logic, perhaps of mathematics. These students, as I'm sure you now presume, will likely find the AR section the most fun, and perform relatively worse (maybe even a point!) in another section. When it comes to me, I love mathematics, and learn it for pleasure, but I am not naturally gifted at it, nor have I practiced puzzles of logic at an consistent interval throughout my life. On my last practice exam, half of my total raw points lost were from the AR section.

I actually love the LSAT and enjoy studying for it; but naturally I was better at LR and RC, so my AR skills require the most refinement. You may hear otherwise around here, but it is my view that, provided one has a normal and healthy human mind, given the will (which flows connately from the aforementioned), enough time (months) and the right material (books, exams, people to talk to etc.) s/he would be capable of achieving a perfect score on the exam (one assumption there is that the healthy mind that possesses the will and the material etc. would combine these effectively to study and make score gains; in fact it would).

I suspect that you posted this poll (which I didn't answer for the above reasons, by the way) because RC is relatively difficult for you. Don't fear--and please, for Love's sake don't let the philosophy that you're inherently limited in LSAT ability due to your past experiences or biological constitution get inside your head (it's false!)--as with Grace, your will, time, and so forth, there is nothing to stop you from perfecting the RC section--or any section for that matter.

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bigtexmex
Posts: 169
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 3:42 pm

Re: Is RC the hardest section to study for?

Postby bigtexmex » Wed Jan 04, 2012 3:50 pm

I never found it hard, but that is because I had to learn (well, more forced to do so in order to keep up with the classes and my obligations as a Teaching Assistant without falling behind) in graduate school how to read multiple books + journal articles a week. For every reading, I had to really take the text apart and write extended academic reviews for almost every book/article that I read. The experience prepared me quite well for breaking down RC on the LSAT without too much of a problem.

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john1990
Posts: 1211
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:49 pm

Re: Is RC the hardest section to study for?

Postby john1990 » Wed Jan 04, 2012 6:24 pm

vtoodler wrote:According to old discussion threads, it is significantly harder to improve your Reading Comprehension (RC) score than to improve your score on the other sections.

Did you find that to be true? Did you find that it took you much more time/ effort to work on RC than the other sections?

I'm including an anonymous poll to this thread.


Once you reach a certain point it can be very hard to improve your LR scores




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